Big Idea 1: Artists manipulate materials and ideas to create an aesthetic object, act, or event. Essential Question: What is art and how is it made?

Save this PDF as:
 WORD  PNG  TXT  JPG

Size: px
Start display at page:

Download "Big Idea 1: Artists manipulate materials and ideas to create an aesthetic object, act, or event. Essential Question: What is art and how is it made?"

Transcription

1 Course Curriculum Big Idea 1: Artists manipulate materials and ideas to create an aesthetic object, act, or event. Essential Question: What is art and how is it made? LEARNING OBJECTIVE 1.1: Students differentiate the components of form, function, content, and/or context of a work of art. Evidence of Student Achievement: Differentiation includes identification and description of form, function, content, and/or contextual information as distinct components of a specific work of art. When students differentiate between form, function, content, and contextual information (all interrelated components of a work of art), they demonstrate understanding of the individual qualities of each component. Their differentiation should include identification and description of relationships between form, function, content, and/or context of the work of art. For example, students differentiation of form and function may include description of both the form and the function of a work of art, as well as a description of how the form and function are related aspects of the work (explaining how each is associated with the other). Learning Objective 1.1? Students should be able to identify and describe at least two components of a work of art: form, function, content, and/or context. Their identifications should be fully accurate; their descriptions should be highly detailed with respect to individual qualities of form, function, content, and context. Students should clearly describe a plausible relationship between form, function, content, and/or context of a work of art, providing visual and/or contextual evidence to support the relationship. concepts and skills related to Learning Objective 1.1? Students can begin by identifying and describing at least two components of a work of art: form, function, content, and/or context. Their identifications and descriptions may be quite basic. Students should relate the components they identified and described to the work of art. 11

2 LEARNING OBJECTIVE 1.2: Students explain how artistic decisions about art making shape a work of art. Evidence of Student Achievement: Explanation includes identification of materials and/or techniques chosen by the artist and description of how the artistic decisions to use specific materials and/or techniques affect the form, function, and/or content of a work of art. For example, a student may explain that the ease with which a material can be shaped and combined with other materials can affect form and content. They may also explain that artistic techniques likewise affect form and content. Students should support inferences about artistic decisions with visual evidence from the work of art. Learning Objective 1.2? Students should be able to identify materials and/or techniques used to create a work of art. Their identifications should be clear and mostly accurate and may include specific details about the materials and/or techniques used. Students may relate materials and/or techniques to visual and/or contextual features of the work. Students should describe how artistic decisions affect form, function, and/or content. Their description should clearly and directly connect artistic materials and/ or techniques with the artistic product, how it looks, what it is used for, and/or what it means. Students description of the relationship between artistic decisions and what the artist produced is mostly accurate. The description of artistic decisions and outcomes is likely to be supported by visual and contextual evidence from the work of art. Students description may also include discussion of specific possibilities and constraints of materials and techniques as related to artistic outcomes. concepts and skills related to Learning Objective 1.2? Students can begin by identifying materials and/or techniques of a work of art. Their identifications should be clear and mostly accurate. Students should describe how artistic decisions affect form, function, and/or content of a work of art. Their description may be general, possibly connecting the materials and/or techniques with what is produced, how it looks, what it is used for, and/or what it means. 12

3 LEARNING OBJECTIVE 1.3: Students describe how context influences artistic decisions about creating a work of art. Evidence of Student Achievement: Description of how original context affects artistic decisions about form, function, and content of a work of art includes discussion of how context relates to material, technique, and/or site selection. Students description of context may involve patrons and intended audiences. For example, within historical and geographic contexts, students may describe how the availability of materials and technologies can affect artistic decisions about what to create; they may also discuss how geography and cultural traditions relating to modes of display can impact decisions about the site of a work of art. Their description may also include discussion of how cultural ideals can influence artistic decisions about materials, techniques, form, and what the work should do and/or represent. Learning Objective 1.3? Students should be able to identify information about the original context of a work of art. Their identification should be accurate with few errors. Students identification of context may be somewhat detailed and likely includes discussion of specific historical, geographic, and/or cultural information relevant to the form, function, and/or content of the work. Students should describe how context affects artistic decisions. Their description should be mostly accurate, relate context and artistic decisions, and include specific and somewhat detailed explanations of how context affects form, function, and/ or content of a work of art. Students description may utilize visual evidence from the work to support the relationship(s) between context and form, function, and content. concepts and skills related to Learning Objective 1.3? Students can begin by identifying information about the original context of a work of art. Their identification of context should be mostly accurate. Students should describe how context affects artistic decisions. Students description may relate context and artistic decisions and may be general and basic in explaining how context affects form, function, and/or content of a work of art. 13

4 LEARNING OBJECTIVE 1.4: Students analyze form, function, content, and/or context to infer or explain the possible intentions for creating a specific work of art. Evidence of Student Achievement: Analysis integrates descriptions of form, function, content, and/or context as evidence for inferences or explanations about artistic intent. For example, students may present inferences or explanations about intent in terms of significant ideas conveyed through a work of art, in terms of the artist s addressing patrons directives, and/or in terms of how the work was initially or subsequently used by audiences. Learning Objective 1.4? Students should be able to describe the form, function, content, and/or context of a work of art. Their descriptions may be somewhat specific and detailed and are largely accurate. Students should analyze form, function, content, and/or context as evidence of artistic intent. Their analysis provides clear and compelling support of a likely artistic intent by applying descriptions of form, function, content, and/or context. Students inferences or explanations about artistic intent may be supported from multiple perspectives (e.g., descriptions of form and function may both be applied as evidence to support artistic intent). concepts and skills related to Learning Objective 1.4? Students can begin by describing form, function, content, and/or context of a work of art. Their descriptions may be basic and somewhat limited. Students should analyze form, function, content, and/or context as evidence of artistic intent. Their analysis provides some support of a plausible artistic intent by applying descriptions of form, function, content, and/or context of a work of art. 14

5 Big Idea 2: Art making is shaped by tradition and change. Essential Question: Why and how does art change? LEARNING OBJECTIVE 2.1: Students describe features of tradition and/or change in a single work of art or in a group of related works. Evidence of Student Achievement: Description may be conveyed in terms of traditions and/or changes in form, function, content, style, aesthetic, artistic practices (including materials and techniques), and/or mode of display. For example, students may describe tradition and/or change by explaining constants and variations in how a specific art form is produced. Learning Objective 2.1? Students should be able to describe how a feature of a work of art is a tradition or change by providing contextual evidence to support their description of the feature. Students description of the feature should explain how it corresponds to or diverges from an established standard of form, function, content, style, aesthetic, artistic practice, or mode of display. Students description of tradition or change may be clear and detailed. concepts and skills related to Learning Objective 2.1? Students can begin by describing how a feature of a work of art is a tradition or change. To describe a traditional feature, students should identify a correspondence between the feature and an established standard of form, function, content, style, aesthetic, artistic practice, or mode of display. To describe a feature of change, students should identify a divergence from an established standard of form, function, content, style, aesthetic, artistic practice, or mode of display. Their description of tradition or change may be general. 15

6 LEARNING OBJECTIVE 2.2: Students explain how and why specific traditions and/or changesare demonstrated in a single work or group of related works. Evidence of Student Achievement: Explanation of how specific traditions and/or changes are demonstrated may include discussion of aspects such as form, function, content, materials, techniques, or iconography. Explanation of why specific traditions and/or changes are demonstrated may include discussion of the context in which the work was created, addressing aspects such as function; materials and techniques; artistic organizations; the artist s relationships with audiences and patrons; exchanges of ideas through travel, trade, training, scholarship, and conquest; cultural ideals; and religious, political, and economic milieu. For example, students may explain change in artistic media by describing the depletion of a material resource traditionally employed by artists, or by the desire to work in more permanent materials, or by the introduction of new techniques. Learning Objective 2.2? Students should be able to describe a specific tradition and/or change in a single work or group of related works. Their descriptions should be clear and detailed, and may be vivid and/or creative. Students should explain why a tradition and/or change is demonstrated in a single work of art or group of related works and state plausible contextual evidence to support their explanations. The evidence they provide should be substantial and specific and may include multiple perspectives (e.g., relating to both artistic techniques and cultural ideals) and novel insights. What should students be able to do to demonstrate basic achievement with the concepts and skills related to Learning Objective 2.2? Students can begin by describing a specific tradition and/or change in a single work or group of related works. Their descriptions may be minimal. Students should explain why the described tradition and/or change is demonstrated in a single work of art or group of related works and state plausible contextual evidence to support the explanation. Their evidence may be very basic. 16

7 LEARNING OBJECTIVE 2.3: Students analyze the influence of a single work of art or group of related works on other artistic production. Evidence of Student Achievement: Analysis of the influence of a single work of art or group of related works on other artistic production may focus on either tradition or change, and may be either within or across cultures. Students analysis should include discussion of why the work was influential and should include examples of other works of art that demonstrate the influence. For example, students may analyze influence by identifying specific features of a work that departed from established traditions, discussing probable reasons why those features were influential on other artistic production, and identifying other artists or works that demonstrate the influence. to do to demonstrate high achievement with the concepts and skills related to Learning Objective 2.3? Students should be able to analyze the influence of an artistic tradition or change on other artists and/or works of art. Students analysis should include identification of the tradition or change in a specific work of art, discussion of why it was influential, and examples of other works of art that were influenced. Their analysis may integrate description of the tradition or change with identification of the influence in other works, possibly providing specific details about aspects of the tradition or change and reasons for its influence. Students should describe the tradition or change clearly, accurately, and in terms relevant to its influence. Students should explain why the tradition or change was influential and provide evidence for their explanation from contextual information. Students should identify specific other works influenced by the tradition or change and may support their identifications with visual and contextual information. What should students be able to do to demonstrate basic achievement with the concepts and skills related to Learning Objective 2.3? Students can begin by analyzing the influence of an artistic tradition or change on other artists and/or works of art by describing the tradition or change, explaining why it was influential, and identifying its influence in other works of art. Students description of the tradition or change should be largely accurate. Students explanation of why the tradition or change was influential should be plausible. Students identification of other works influenced by the tradition or change may be general and basic. 17

8 Big Idea 3: Interpretations of art are variable. Essential Question: How do we describe our thinking about art? LEARNING OBJECTIVE 3.1: Students identify a work of art. Evidence of Student Achievement: Identification involves providing the following information about a work of art: title or designation, name of the artist and/or culture of origin, date of creation, and materials as described within the AP Art History image set. Identification also involves providing information about form, function, content, and/or context of a work of art. Identification of works beyond the image set requires the same level of detail as specified for works within the image set. Learning Objective 3.1? Students should be able to identify a work of art clearly and accurately. Students identification likely provides relevant details about the artist and/or work that may support their discussion of the identified features. concepts and skills related to Learning Objective 3.1? Students can begin by identifying a work of art with some accuracy. Their identification may be somewhat basic but is generally complete (e.g., students may identify the period of a recent work but may not provide a more specific time of production). LEARNING OBJECTIVE 3.2: Students analyze how formal qualities and/or content of a work of art elicit(s) a response. Evidence of Student Achievement: Analysis indicates how the artist s application of formal elements and principles of design and/or the artist s creation of content within a work of art elicit(s) a response from an audience. Students may use analysis to examine whether audience responses are perceptual, intellectual, kinesthetic, and/or emotional. For example, their analysis may describe how use of repetitive elements within a work of art creates a visual path for the audience that leads to the focal point of the work identified by its size, contrasting shape and color, and placement within the composition. 18

9 Learning Objective 3.2? Students should be able to analyze how the artist s application of formal qualities and/or content elicit(s) a response from an audience. Students should make a substantial connection between formal qualities and/or content of the work of art and audience response. The connection is clear and convincing and may be supported by visual and/or contextual evidence. Students should identify formal qualities and/or content of a work of art accurately. Their identifications may contain descriptive details that relate to their discussion of audience response. Students should describe audience response clearly, with specific contextual details relating to the formal qualities and/or content of the work of art. concepts and skills related to Learning Objective 3.2? Students can begin by analyzing how the artist s application of formal qualities and/or content in a work of art elicit(s) an audience response. Their analysis makes a connection between formal qualities and/or content of the work and audience response. The connection may be very basic. Students identification of formal qualities and/or content may be minimal but should be mostly accurate. Students description of audience response may be general. LEARNING OBJECTIVE 3.3: Students analyze how contextual variables lead to different interpretations of a work of art. Evidence of Student Achievement: Analysis of how contextual variables lead to different interpretations of a work of art includes identifying each interpretation and explaining how it is related to contextual variables. Contextual variables may include time, place, culture, mode of display, and audience. For example, students analysis may explain how a work of art created to serve as a private devotional object was interpreted by its original audience (the owner of the devotional object) and its current audience (visitors to the museum where it is displayed), based on the two audiences relationship with the object, including how the work was/is displayed and used. Learning Objective 3.3? Students should be able to analyze how contextual variables lead to different interpretations of a work of art. Students may clearly relate the multiple interpretations to specific contextual variables. Students may discuss contextual variables in detail to explain the different interpretations of the work of art. 19

10 Students descriptions of different interpretations of a work of art should be convincing and relevant to the contextual variables discussed. concepts and skills related to Learning Objective 3.3? Students can begin by analyzing how contextual variables lead to different interpretations of a work of art. Students relate the multiple interpretations to contextual variables; relationships may be general. Students descriptions of different interpretations of a work of art should be generally plausible. LEARNING OBJECTIVE 3.4: Students justify attribution of an unknown work of art. Evidence of Student Achievement: Justification of attribution of a work of art not included in the prescribed AP Art History image set to an artist, group, region, period, and/or culture includes identifying similarities of form, function, content, style, and/or hand of the artist with a work included in the prescribed AP Art History image set. For example, students may justify attribution of an architectural monument not included in the image set by identifying similarities of structural components, building materials and processes, narrative elements, and stylistic tendencies between the unknown work and a work in the image set. Learning Objective 3.4? Students should be able to attribute an unknown work of art with a high degree of accuracy. Their attribution is correct and explicit. Students justification of the attribution likely identifies and describes in detail multiple similarities between the unknown work and a work in the image set that support the attribution. concepts and skills related to Learning Objective 3.4? Students can begin by attributing an unknown work of art with general accuracy. Their attribution may lack specificity (e.g., the general cultural origin of a work may be correctly attributed, but the time frame may be very broadly defined). Students justification of the attribution identifies a similarity between the unknown work and a work in the image set that supports the attribution. 20

11 LEARNING OBJECTIVE 3.5: Students analyze relationships between works of art based on their similarities and differences. Evidence of Student Achievement: Analysis of relationships between two works of art is comparative. Works compared can span time, cultures, and media or can be drawn from the same time, culture, or media. When students compare, they should analyze the relationships between the works based on form, function, content, and/ or context. For example, students may use comparative analysis of two works of art to examine relationships between the appearance and presentation of the works, how the works are used, ideas represented and embodied by the works, and the milieu in which each work was produced. Learning Objective 3.5? Students should be able to analyze relationships between two works of art by comparing similarities and differences. Students may discuss multiple similarities and differences. Their analysis should be developed and clear and should provide relevant detail to describe relationships between the works. Students should analyze features of each work of art as they relate to the other. Similarities and differences identified by students should be accurate, convincing, and described with some detail. Subtle differences or nuances within similarities (and vice versa) may be identified. concepts and skills related to Learning Objective 3.5? Students can begin by analyzing relationships between two works of art, comparing similarities and differences. Their analysis may be very basic. Students analyze features of each work in a way that loosely relates one work to the other. Similarities and differences identified by students are mostly accurate and plausible. 21

12 Glossary Aesthetic refers to a type of human experience that combines perception, feeling, meaning making, and appreciation of qualities of produced and/or manipulated objects, acts, and events of daily life. Aesthetic experience motivates behavior and creates categories through which our experiences of the world can be organized. Artistic associations include self-defined groups, workshops, academies, and movements. Artistic traditions are norms of artistic production and artistic products. Artistic traditions are demonstrated through art-making processes (utilization of materials and techniques, mode of display), through interactions between works of art and audience, and within form and/or content of a work of art. Artistic changes are divergences from tradition in artistic choices demonstrated through art-making processes, through interactions between works of art and audience, and within form and/or content. Tradition and change in form and content may be described in terms of style. Audiences of a work of art are those who interact with the work as participants, facilitators, and/or observers. Audience characteristics include gender, ethnicity, race, age, socioeconomic status, beliefs, and values. Audience groups may be contemporaries, descendants, collectors, scholars, gallery/museum visitors, and other artists. Content of a work of art consists of interacting, communicative elements of design, representation, and presentation within a work of art. Content includes subject matter: visible imagery that may be formal depictions (e.g., minimalist or nonobjective works), representative depictions (e.g., portraiture and landscape), and/or symbolic depictions (e.g., emblems and logos). Content may be narrative, symbolic, spiritual, historical, mythological, supernatural, and/or propagandistic (e.g., satirical and/or protest oriented). Context includes original and subsequent historical and cultural milieu of a work of art. Context includes information about the time, place, and culture in which a work of art was created, as well as information about when, where, and how subsequent audiences interacted with the work. The artist s intended purpose for a work of art is contextual information, as is the chosen site for the work (which may be public or private), as well as subsequent locations of the work. Modes of display of a work of art can include associated paraphernalia (e.g., ceremonial objects and attire) and multisensory stimuli (e.g., scent and sound). Characteristics of the artist and audience including intellectual ideals, beliefs, and attitudes, and aesthetic, religious, political, social, and economic attributes are context. Patronage, ownership of a work of art, and other power relationships are also aspects of context. Contextual information includes audience response to a work of art. Contextual information may be provided through records, reports, religious chronicles, personal reflections, manifestos, academic publications, mass media, sociological data, cultural studies, geographic data, artifacts, narrative and/ or performance (e.g., oral, written, poetry, music, dance, dramatic productions), documentation, archaeology, and research. Design elements are line, shape, color (hue, value, saturation), texture, value (shading), space, and form. 22

13 Design principles are balance/symmetry, rhythm/pattern, movement, harmony, contrast, emphasis, proportion/scale, and unity. Form describes component materials and how they are employed to create physical and visual elements that coalesce into a work of art. Form is investigated by applying design elements and principles to analyze the work s fundamental visual components and their relationship to the work in its entirety. Function includes the artist s intended use(s) for the work and the actual use(s) of the work, which may change according to the context of audience, time, location, and culture. Functions may be for utility, intercession, decoration, communication, and commemoration and may be spiritual, social, political, and/or personally expressive. Materials (or medium) include raw ingredients (such as pigment, wood, and limestone), compounds (such as textile, ceramic, and ink), and components (such as beads, paper, and performance) used to create a work of art. Specific materials have inherent properties (e.g., pliability, fragility, and permanence) and tend to accrue cultural value (e.g., the value of gold or feathers due to relative rarity or exoticism). Presentation is the display, enactment, and/or appearance of a work of art. Response is the reaction of a person or population to the experience generated by a work of art. Responses from an audience to a work of art may be physical, perceptual, spiritual, intellectual, and/or emotional. Style is a combination of unique and defining features that can reflect the historical period, geographic location, cultural context, and individual hand of the artist. Techniques include art-making processes, tools, and technologies that accommodate and/or overcome material properties. Techniques range from simple to complex and easy to difficult, and may be practiced by one artist or may necessitate a group effort. A work of art is created by the artist s deliberate manipulation of materials and techniques to produce purposeful form and content, which may be architecture, an object, an act, and/or an event. A work of art may be two-, three-, or fourdimensional (time-based and performative). 23

Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Arts Alignment with the. International Violin Competition of Indianapolis Juried Exhibition of Student Art

Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Arts Alignment with the. International Violin Competition of Indianapolis Juried Exhibition of Student Art Indiana Academic Standards for Visual Arts Alignment with the International Violin Competition of Indianapolis Juried Exhibition of Student Art INTRODUCTION The Juried Exhibition of Student Art sponsored

More information

Curriculum Guides. Elementary Art. Weld County School District 6 Learning Services th Avenue Greeley, CO /

Curriculum Guides. Elementary Art. Weld County School District 6 Learning Services th Avenue Greeley, CO / 2015-2016 Curriculum Guides Elementary Art Weld County School District 6 Learning Services 1025 9 th Avenue Greeley, CO 80631 970/348-6000 Kindergarten Kindergarten Art Curriculum Guide PART A (Standards

More information

New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for Visual and Performing Arts INTRODUCTION

New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for Visual and Performing Arts INTRODUCTION Content Area Standard Strand By the end of grade P 2 New Jersey Core Curriculum Content Standards for Visual and Performing Arts INTRODUCTION Visual and Performing Arts 1.3 Performance: All students will

More information

2015 Arizona Arts Standards. Theatre Standards K - High School

2015 Arizona Arts Standards. Theatre Standards K - High School 2015 Arizona Arts Standards Theatre Standards K - High School These Arizona theatre standards serve as a framework to guide the development of a well-rounded theatre curriculum that is tailored to the

More information

https://asd-pa.perfplusk12.com/admin/admin_curric_maps_display.aspx?m=3502&c=469...

https://asd-pa.perfplusk12.com/admin/admin_curric_maps_display.aspx?m=3502&c=469... Page 1 of 6 Teacher: Art4, CORE Course: Art4 Year: 2012-13 Units: - All - Element of Color Identify complementary and intermediate colors. Recognize value within the hue Use appropriate vocabulary What

More information

AP ART HISTORY 2012 SCORING GUIDELINES

AP ART HISTORY 2012 SCORING GUIDELINES AP ART HISTORY 2012 SCORING GUIDELINES 0BQuestion 1 Across the world, particular materials that have cultural significance have been used to shape the meaning of works of art. Select and fully identify

More information

Myths, Icons, Sacred Symbols and Semiotics. Roland Barthes and Structuralism as a Tool for Understanding Global Culture

Myths, Icons, Sacred Symbols and Semiotics. Roland Barthes and Structuralism as a Tool for Understanding Global Culture Myths, Icons, Sacred Symbols and Semiotics Roland Barthes and Structuralism as a Tool for Understanding Global Culture Roland Barthes Mythologies Mythologies is a book by Roland Barthes, published in 1957.

More information

Aesthetic Qualities Cues within artwork, such as literal, visual, and expressive qualities, which are examined during the art criticism process.

Aesthetic Qualities Cues within artwork, such as literal, visual, and expressive qualities, which are examined during the art criticism process. Maryland State Department of Education VISUAL ARTS GLOSSARY A Hyperlink to Voluntary State Curricula Aesthetic Qualities or experience derived from or based upon the senses and how they are affected or

More information

WRITING A PRÈCIS. What is a précis? The definition

WRITING A PRÈCIS. What is a précis? The definition What is a précis? The definition WRITING A PRÈCIS Précis, from the Old French and literally meaning cut short (dictionary.com), is a concise summary of an article or other work. The précis, then, explains

More information

ISU: Comparative Art History Essay (10%)

ISU: Comparative Art History Essay (10%) ISU: Comparative Art History Essay (%) Name: STEP ONE: RESEARCH: the web page on the school network and begin thinking about what social commentary means in art: Social/Cultural Theme: War (Second World

More information

Introduction to Rhetoric (from OWL Purdue website)

Introduction to Rhetoric (from OWL Purdue website) Elements of Rhetorical Situations Introduction to Rhetoric (from OWL Purdue website) There is no one singular rhetorical situation that applies to all instances of communication. Rather, all human efforts

More information

What's the Difference? Art and Ethnography in Museums. Illustration 1: Section of Mexican exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art

What's the Difference? Art and Ethnography in Museums. Illustration 1: Section of Mexican exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum of Art Laura Newsome Culture of Archives, Museums, and Libraries Term Paper 4/28/2010 What's the Difference? Art and Ethnography in Museums Illustration 1: Section of Mexican exhibit at the Metropolitan Museum

More information

Animated Optical Illusion Project

Animated Optical Illusion Project Animated Optical Illusion Project Animated - full of life, action, or spirit; lively; vigorous; (of a movie or image) made using animation techniques. Name: Optical - of or relating to sight, especially

More information

ICOMOS ENAME CHARTER

ICOMOS ENAME CHARTER ICOMOS ENAME CHARTER For the Interpretation of Cultural Heritage Sites FOURTH DRAFT Revised under the Auspices of the ICOMOS International Scientific Committee on Interpretation and Presentation 31 July

More information

K Use kinesthetic awareness, proper use of space and the ability to move safely. use of space (2, 5)

K Use kinesthetic awareness, proper use of space and the ability to move safely. use of space (2, 5) DANCE CREATIVE EXPRESSION Standard: Students develop creative expression through the application of knowledge, ideas, communication skills, organizational abilities, and imagination. Use kinesthetic awareness,

More information

AP Studio Art 2006 Scoring Guidelines

AP Studio Art 2006 Scoring Guidelines AP Studio Art 2006 Scoring Guidelines The College Board: Connecting Students to College Success The College Board is a not-for-profit membership association whose mission is to connect students to college

More information

Misc Fiction Irony Point of view Plot time place social environment

Misc Fiction Irony Point of view Plot time place social environment Misc Fiction 1. is the prevailing atmosphere or emotional aura of a work. Setting, tone, and events can affect the mood. In this usage, mood is similar to tone and atmosphere. 2. is the choice and use

More information

PRIMARY ARTS AND HUMANITIES

PRIMARY ARTS AND HUMANITIES Back to Table of Contents Kentucky Department of Education PRIMARY ARTS AND HUMANITIES Kentucky Core Academic Standards English Language Arts - Primary 6 Kentucky Core Academic Standards Arts and Humanities

More information

Publishing India Group

Publishing India Group Journal published by Publishing India Group wish to state, following: - 1. Peer review and Publication policy 2. Ethics policy for Journal Publication 3. Duties of Authors 4. Duties of Editor 5. Duties

More information

Kindergarten Visual Arts Curriculum Essentials Document

Kindergarten Visual Arts Curriculum Essentials Document Kindergarten Visual Arts Curriculum Essentials Document Boulder Valley School District Department of Curriculum and Instruction February 2012 Introduction The Boulder Valley Elementary Visual Arts Curriculum

More information

I. Introduction Assessment Plan for Ph.D. in Musicology & Ethnomusicology School of Music, College of Fine Arts

I. Introduction Assessment Plan for Ph.D. in Musicology & Ethnomusicology School of Music, College of Fine Arts I. Introduction Assessment Plan for Ph.D. in Musicology & Ethnomusicology School of Music, College of Fine Arts Unit Mission Statement: First, the Division of Musicology and Ethnomusicology seeks to foster

More information

Utopian Invention Drawing

Utopian Invention Drawing Utopian Invention Drawing Concept: Create an invention that will improve our world. Name: STEP ONE: Look on the reverse of this sheet at Leonardo Da Vinci s: Visions of the Future and answer the following

More information

MANOR ROAD PRIMARY SCHOOL

MANOR ROAD PRIMARY SCHOOL MANOR ROAD PRIMARY SCHOOL MUSIC POLICY May 2011 Manor Road Primary School Music Policy INTRODUCTION This policy reflects the school values and philosophy in relation to the teaching and learning of Music.

More information

1. Controlled Vocabularies in Context

1. Controlled Vocabularies in Context 1. Controlled Vocabularies in Context A controlled vocabulary is an information tool that contains standardized words and phrases used to refer to ideas, physical characteristics, people, places, events,

More information

African Dance Forms: Introduction:

African Dance Forms: Introduction: African Dance Forms: Introduction: Africa is a large continent made up of many countries each country having its own unique diverse cultural mix. African dance is a movement expression that consists of

More information

ICOMOS Ename Charter for the Interpretation of Cultural Heritage Sites

ICOMOS Ename Charter for the Interpretation of Cultural Heritage Sites ICOMOS Ename Charter for the Interpretation of Cultural Heritage Sites Revised Third Draft, 5 July 2005 Preamble Just as the Venice Charter established the principle that the protection of the extant fabric

More information

SWEET ADELINES INTERNATIONAL MARCH 2005 KOUT VOCAL STUDIOS. Barbershop Criteria

SWEET ADELINES INTERNATIONAL MARCH 2005 KOUT VOCAL STUDIOS. Barbershop Criteria Barbershop Criteria Sweet Adelines International 1. It has four parts - no more, no less. 2. It has melodies that are easily remembered. 3. Barbershop harmonic structure is characterized by: a strong bass

More information

AP English Literature and Composition

AP English Literature and Composition 2017 AP English Literature and Composition Sample Student Responses and Scoring Commentary Inside: RR Free Response Question 1 RR Scoring Guideline RR Student Samples RR Scoring Commentary 2017 The College

More information

High School Studio Art 2 Curriculum Essentials Document

High School Studio Art 2 Curriculum Essentials Document High School Studio Art 2 Curriculum Essentials Document Boulder Valley School District Department of Curriculum and Instruction February 2012 Introduction The Boulder Valley Elementary Visual Arts Curriculum

More information

American Identity Tour Irving Penn Irving Penn: Beyond Beauty

American Identity Tour Irving Penn Irving Penn: Beyond Beauty : Beyond Beauty Intro (in Great Hall) Welcome to the Wichita Art Museum! Each group: Introduce yourself and go over expectations. Address Basic Needs: make sure students/chaperones know where restrooms

More information

Ganado Unified School District (ART/7 th -8th)

Ganado Unified School District (ART/7 th -8th) Ganado Unified School District (ART/7 th -8th) PACING Guide SY 2016 Timeline & Unit 1: Create a physical Portfolio Syllabus review Expectations Seating Power point on selected artist Examples of artists

More information

Expressive arts Experiences and outcomes

Expressive arts Experiences and outcomes Expressive arts Experiences and outcomes Experiences in the expressive arts involve creating and presenting and are practical and experiential. Evaluating and appreciating are used to enhance enjoyment

More information

Performing Arts in ART

Performing Arts in ART The Art and Accessibility of Music MUSIC STANDARDS National Content Standards for Music California Music Content Standards GRADES K 4 GRADES K 5 1. Singing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of

More information

National Core Arts Standards Make a Joyful Noise : Renaissance Art and Music at Florence Cathedral Grades K-12

National Core Arts Standards Make a Joyful Noise : Renaissance Art and Music at Florence Cathedral Grades K-12 National Core Arts Standards Make a Joyful Noise : Renaissance Art and Music at Florence Cathedral Grades K-12 Make a Joyful Noise can support the following National Core Arts Standards: Pre-K: VA:Cr1.1.PKa

More information

Grade 7 Art Curriculum Maps

Grade 7 Art Curriculum Maps Grade 7 Art Curriculum Maps Unit of Study: Elements and Principles of Art Unit of Study: Formal Art Critique Unit of Study: Ceramics Unit of Study: Computer Research Unit of Study: Elements and Principles

More information

Fourth Grade Art. Page: 1 of 23

Fourth Grade Art. Page: 1 of 23 Title Fourth Grade Art Type Individual Document Map Authors Christine LaPosta, Thomas Kuplin, Jane Frances Speronza Subject Visual and Performing Arts Course Art Grade 4 Grade(s) 04 Location Franklin,

More information

SAMPLE ASSESSMENT TASKS MUSIC GENERAL YEAR 12

SAMPLE ASSESSMENT TASKS MUSIC GENERAL YEAR 12 SAMPLE ASSESSMENT TASKS MUSIC GENERAL YEAR 12 Copyright School Curriculum and Standards Authority, 2015 This document apart from any third party copyright material contained in it may be freely copied,

More information

Quantify. The Subjective. PQM: A New Quantitative Tool for Evaluating Display Design Options

Quantify. The Subjective. PQM: A New Quantitative Tool for Evaluating Display Design Options PQM: A New Quantitative Tool for Evaluating Display Design Options Software, Electronics, and Mechanical Systems Laboratory 3M Optical Systems Division Jennifer F. Schumacher, John Van Derlofske, Brian

More information

Looking at and Talking about Art with Kids

Looking at and Talking about Art with Kids Looking at and Talking about Art with Kids Craig Roland, Ed.D. School of Art & Art History University of Florida rolandc@ufl.edu If we want to understand a work of art, we should look at the time in which

More information

AP English Literature and Composition

AP English Literature and Composition 2017 AP English Literature and Composition Sample Student Responses and Scoring Commentary Inside: RR Free Response Question 2 RR Scoring Guideline RR Student Samples RR Scoring Commentary 2017 The College

More information

STUDENT S HEIRLOOMS IN THE CLASSROOM: A LOOK AT EVERYDAY ART FORMS. Patricia H. Kahn, Ph.D. Ohio Dominican University

STUDENT S HEIRLOOMS IN THE CLASSROOM: A LOOK AT EVERYDAY ART FORMS. Patricia H. Kahn, Ph.D. Ohio Dominican University STUDENT S HEIRLOOMS IN THE CLASSROOM: A LOOK AT EVERYDAY ART FORMS Patricia H. Kahn, Ph.D. Ohio Dominican University Lauri Lydy Reidmiller, Ph.D. Ohio Dominican University Abstract This paper examines

More information

Central Park Zoo Poetry: The Language of Conservation Case Overview

Central Park Zoo Poetry: The Language of Conservation Case Overview Central Park Zoo Poetry: The Language of Conservation Case Overview The Central Park Zoo, located in the heart of Manhattan, wanted a way to communicate to the public their message of conservation in an

More information

Researching with visual images:

Researching with visual images: Researching with visual images: Some guidance notes and a glossary for beginners Jon Prosser University of Leeds ESRC National Centre for Research Methods NCRM Working Paper Series 6/06 Real Life Methods

More information

CURRICULUM FOR ADVANCED PLACEMENT MUSIC THEORY GRADES 10-12

CURRICULUM FOR ADVANCED PLACEMENT MUSIC THEORY GRADES 10-12 CURRICULUM FOR ADVANCED PLACEMENT MUSIC THEORY GRADES 10-12 This curriculum is part of the Educational Program of Studies of the Rahway Public Schools. ACKNOWLEDGMENTS Frank G. Mauriello, Interim Assistant

More information

Fairfield Public Schools English Curriculum

Fairfield Public Schools English Curriculum Fairfield Public Schools English Curriculum Reading, Writing, Speaking and Listening, Language Satire Satire: Description Satire pokes fun at people and institutions (i.e., political parties, educational

More information

Fenwick Gallery Use Policies March 29, 2014

Fenwick Gallery Use Policies March 29, 2014 Mission Fenwick Gallery Use Policies March 29, 2014 George Mason University Libraries provides a hybrid, walk-through exhibition space in Fenwick Library to enhance and enrich teaching, learning and culture

More information

Combine concepts collaboratively to generate innovative ideas for creating art.

Combine concepts collaboratively to generate innovative ideas for creating art. VISUAL ARTS - Creating Anchor Standard 1: Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work. Enduring Understanding: Creativity and innovative thinking are essential life skills that can be developed.

More information

Mise en scène Short Film Project Name:

Mise en scène Short Film Project Name: Mise en scène Short Film Project Name: Mise-en-scène is an expression used to describe aspects of a theatre or film production, which essentially means "visual theme" or "telling a story" both in visually

More information

Resources. Include appropriate web-site information/texts/dvd/vcr

Resources. Include appropriate web-site information/texts/dvd/vcr Art IV/AP Studio Art unleveled full year course 4 credits By the end of basic study in grades 9 12 By the end of extended study in grades 9-12 Unit: Observation Drawing-textured charcoal drawings Essential

More information

Visual Arts Benchmarks: Grades K-12 Victor Central Schools Acknowledgements

Visual Arts Benchmarks: Grades K-12 Victor Central Schools Acknowledgements Visual Arts Benchmarks: Grades K-12 Victor Central Schools Acknowledgements Angela Perrotto Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction Ron Bartlett Dave Denner Marysue Holtz Caitlin Melville

More information

ENGL S092 Improving Writing Skills ENGL S110 Introduction to College Writing ENGL S111 Methods of Written Communication

ENGL S092 Improving Writing Skills ENGL S110 Introduction to College Writing ENGL S111 Methods of Written Communication ENGL S092 Improving Writing Skills 1. Identify elements of sentence and paragraph construction and compose effective sentences and paragraphs. 2. Compose coherent and well-organized essays. 3. Present

More information

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS

ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS ENGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS Content Domain l. Vocabulary, Reading Comprehension, and Reading Various Text Forms Range of Competencies 0001 0004 23% ll. Analyzing and Interpreting Literature 0005 0008 23% lli.

More information

Mr. Cunningham s Expository text

Mr. Cunningham s Expository text Mr. Cunningham s Expository text project Book due Now _You will have turn in dates on Tunitin.com for some of the more important sections to see how you are doing. These will be graded. October 19 First1/4

More information

2014 HSC Visual Arts Marking Guidelines

2014 HSC Visual Arts Marking Guidelines 2014 HSC Visual Arts Marking Guidelines Section I Question 1 Demonstrates a sound understanding of how ideas inform Chihuly s artmaking practice Source material is used in a reasoned way Demonstrates some

More information

AP English Literature and Composition 2004 Scoring Guidelines Form B

AP English Literature and Composition 2004 Scoring Guidelines Form B AP English Literature and Composition 2004 Scoring Guidelines Form B The materials included in these files are intended for noncommercial use by AP teachers for course and exam preparation; permission

More information

Supplement to the DANCE 8 TO 10 IRP (1995) Required Program Model Content for Dance 10: Dance Choreography Dance Performance

Supplement to the DANCE 8 TO 10 IRP (1995) Required Program Model Content for Dance 10: Dance Choreography Dance Performance Supplement to the DANCE 8 TO 10 IRP (1995) Required Program Model Content for Dance 10: Dance Choreography Dance Performance Province of British Columbia Ministry of Education 2004 TABLE OF CONTENTS INTRODUCTION

More information

Academic. Vocabulary. Assessments. Student Outcomes. Duration of Unit: 7 weeks Title of Unit: Art Showcase. Content Area: Visual Art Grade Level:

Academic. Vocabulary. Assessments. Student Outcomes. Duration of Unit: 7 weeks Title of Unit: Art Showcase. Content Area: Visual Art Grade Level: Unit 1 Duration of Unit: 7 weeks Title of Unit: Art Showcase Content Area: Visual Art Grade Level: Big Idea: 5 Combining ideas for art-making Art and Diversity Standards (Focus standards are bold.) New

More information

1. Use interesting materials and/or techniques. Title: Medium: Comments:

1. Use interesting materials and/or techniques. Title: Medium: Comments: ART CAN! Find pieces that match these aspects of Contemporary Art. 1. Use interesting materials and/or techniques. Title: Medium: Comments: 2. Express emotions without relying on recognizable images. Title:

More information

Multiple Critical Perspectives. Teaching John Steinbeck's. Of Mice and Men. from. Multiple Critical Perspectives. Michelle Ryan

Multiple Critical Perspectives. Teaching John Steinbeck's. Of Mice and Men. from. Multiple Critical Perspectives. Michelle Ryan Teaching John Steinbeck's Of Mice and Men from by Michelle Ryan Of Mice and Men General Introduction to the Work Introduction to Of Mice and Men John Steinbeck wa s born in 1902 in Salinas, California.

More information

ENGLISH Home Language

ENGLISH Home Language Guideline For the setting of Curriculum F.E.T. LITERATURE (Paper 2) for 2008 NCS examination GRADE 12 ENGLISH Home Language EXAMINATION GUIDELINE GUIDELINE DOCUMENT: EXAMINATIONS ENGLISH HOME LANGUAGE:

More information

Overview: Students will identify the essential elements of a place, of landforms, ecosystems and/or of continents.

Overview: Students will identify the essential elements of a place, of landforms, ecosystems and/or of continents. Portrait II Overview: Students will identify the essential elements of a place, of landforms, ecosystems and/or of continents. Goals: This lesson will Support concepts & skills: use geographic terms correctly;

More information

Implications. Defining the User IN THIS ISSUE. A Newsletter by InformeDesign. A Web site for design and human behavior research.

Implications. Defining the User IN THIS ISSUE. A Newsletter by InformeDesign. A Web site for design and human behavior research. A Newsletter by InformeDesign. A Web site for design and human behavior research. VOL. 01 ISSUE 09 IN THIS ISSUE Defining the User Color Meaning Across Cultures Symbols and Culture Related Research Summaries

More information

Theatre Standards Grades P-12

Theatre Standards Grades P-12 Theatre Standards Grades P-12 Artistic Process THEATRE Anchor Standard 1 Creating Generate and conceptualize artistic ideas and work. s Theatre artists rely on intuition, curiosity, and critical inquiry.

More information

Moral Geography and Exploration of the Moral Possibility Space

Moral Geography and Exploration of the Moral Possibility Space Book Review/173 Moral Geography and Exploration of the Moral Possibility Space BONGRAE SEOK Alvernia University, Reading, Pennsylvania, USA (bongrae.seok@alvernia.edu) Owen Flanagan, The Geography of Morals,

More information

Volume, pace, clarity and expression are appropriate. Tone of voice occasionally engages the audience

Volume, pace, clarity and expression are appropriate. Tone of voice occasionally engages the audience SCO 1: justify understanding of an idea, issue, or through effective communication Verbal/ Non-Verbal Communication Volume, pace, clarity and expression are inappropriate Tone of voice fails to engage

More information

Year 12 Literature Conditions for SACs and due dates 2018

Year 12 Literature Conditions for SACs and due dates 2018 Year 12 Literature Conditions for SACs and due dates 2018 Students give 1 SAC book to teacher at beginning of the year. All SAC s throughout will be completed in SAC book. SAC books to be kept by teacher.

More information

A2 Art Share Supporting Materials

A2 Art Share Supporting Materials A2 Art Share Supporting Materials Contents: Oral Presentation Outline 1 Oral Presentation Content 1 Exhibit Experience 4 Speaking Engagements 4 New City Review 5 Reading Analysis Worksheet 5 A2 Art Share

More information

TIPS FOR THE AP RHETORICAL ANALYSIS ESSAY

TIPS FOR THE AP RHETORICAL ANALYSIS ESSAY TIPS FOR THE AP RHETORICAL ANALYSIS ESSAY FUNDAMENTAL CONCEPT: All writings are rhetorical. Any poem, short story, novel, essay, etc., contains certain ideas or feelings. The writer wishes for the reader

More information

The Frames: Subjective Frame. Structural Frame. Cultural Frame. Postmodern Frame

The Frames: Subjective Frame. Structural Frame. Cultural Frame. Postmodern Frame HOW TO LOOK AT ART CRTCAL ANALYSS FRAMEWORKS nteracting with art can happen in many different ways. Here you will find suggestions for generating discussion and understanding artworks. The Frames: Subjective

More information

THINGS TO REMEMBER ART APPRECIATION

THINGS TO REMEMBER ART APPRECIATION PREMIER CURRICULUM SERIES Based on the Sunshine State Standards for Secondary Education, established by the State of Florida, Department of Education THINGS TO REMEMBER ART APPRECIATION Copyright 2009

More information

2018/01/16. Jordana Mendicino

2018/01/16. Jordana Mendicino Jordana Mendicino Introducing the Land We Are On/ How I read Indigenous Literature Quick Facts on Basil Johnston Looking at the Territories (Maps) Residential School Context Article from The Globe and

More information

Characterization Imaginary Body and Center. Inspired Acting. Body Psycho-physical Exercises

Characterization Imaginary Body and Center. Inspired Acting. Body Psycho-physical Exercises Characterization Imaginary Body and Center Atmosphere Composition Focal Point Objective Psychological Gesture Style Truth Ensemble Improvisation Jewelry Radiating Receiving Imagination Inspired Acting

More information

Elements of a Short Story

Elements of a Short Story Name: Class: Elements of a Short Story PLOT: Plot is the sequence of incidents or events of which a story is composed. Most short stories follow a similar line of plot development. 3 6 4 5 1 2 1. Introduction

More information

Nacogdoches High School: English I PreAP Summer Reading

Nacogdoches High School: English I PreAP Summer Reading Nacogdoches High School: English I PreAP Summer Reading 2016-2017 In preparation for English I PAP at Nacogdoches High School, we ask you to read the classic novel Of Mice and Men by John Steinbeck. Amazon.com

More information

Summit Public Schools Summit, New Jersey Grade Level 3/ Content Area: Visual Arts

Summit Public Schools Summit, New Jersey Grade Level 3/ Content Area: Visual Arts Summit Public Schools Summit, New Jersey Grade Level 3/ Content Area: Visual Arts Curriculum Course Description: The third grade visual art curriculum provides experiences for students to explore their

More information

Pre K Kindergarten 1st 2nd. 3rd 4th 5th. Analyze the components in visual imagery used to convey a message. 6th 7th 8th

Pre K Kindergarten 1st 2nd. 3rd 4th 5th. Analyze the components in visual imagery used to convey a message. 6th 7th 8th Enduring Understanding: Visual imagery throughout one's culture influences one's understanding of and response to the world. Essential Question(s): What is an image? How do images influence our views of

More information

Knowledge Representation

Knowledge Representation ! Knowledge Representation " Concise representation of knowledge that is manipulatable in software.! Types of Knowledge " Declarative knowledge (facts) " Procedural knowledge (how to do something) " Analogous

More information

A Brief Overview of Literary Criticism

A Brief Overview of Literary Criticism A Brief Overview of Literary Criticism Woman Reading Book in a Landscape, Camille Corot Literary Critical Theory is a tool that helps you find meaning in stories, poems and plays. There are many different

More information

ARTS. Complexity Aesthetics Responsibility Ethics. Course and. Selected PLOs related to Sustainability & the Environment.

ARTS. Complexity Aesthetics Responsibility Ethics. Course and. Selected PLOs related to Sustainability & the Environment. rea Complexity esthetics Responsibility thics RTS develop and make images: - using a variety of design strategies and sources of imagery, individually and in combination - incorporating some elements from

More information

Reading a Portrait: Symbols and Politicians at the Biggs

Reading a Portrait: Symbols and Politicians at the Biggs Reading a Portrait: Symbols and Politicians at the Biggs Grades: Grades 4-7 Subjects: Social Studies, Visual Arts Time Required: 30-45 minutes Author: Biggs Museum Curator of Education Featured Artwork:

More information

Rhetoric - The Basics

Rhetoric - The Basics Name AP Language, period Ms. Lockwood Rhetoric - The Basics Style analysis asks you to separate the content you are taking in from the methods used to successfully convey that content. This is a skill

More information

VISUAL ARTS K-12 LEARNING OUTCOMES & BENCHMARKS

VISUAL ARTS K-12 LEARNING OUTCOMES & BENCHMARKS VISUAL ARTS K-12 LEARNING OUTCOMES & BENCHMARKS Learning Outcomes and Benchmarks Below you will find the Learning Outcomes and Benchmarks for the International Baccalaureate Primary Years Programme, Middle

More information

Interpreting Museums as Cultural Metaphors

Interpreting Museums as Cultural Metaphors Marilyn Zurmuehlen Working Papers in Art Education ISSN: 2326-7070 (Print) ISSN: 2326-7062 (Online) Volume 10 Issue 1 (1991) pps. 2-7 Interpreting Museums as Cultural Metaphors Michael Sikes Copyright

More information

CHAPTER TWO. A brief explanation of the Berger and Luckmann s theory that will be used in this thesis.

CHAPTER TWO. A brief explanation of the Berger and Luckmann s theory that will be used in this thesis. CHAPTER TWO A brief explanation of the Berger and Luckmann s theory that will be used in this thesis. 2.1 Introduction The intention of this chapter is twofold. First, to discuss briefly Berger and Luckmann

More information

THE ELEMENTS OF ART IN PHOTOGRAPHY

THE ELEMENTS OF ART IN PHOTOGRAPHY THE ELEMENTS OF ART IN PHOTOGRAPHY As complex as photographic works typically are, there are really only three general categories of statements one can make about them. A statement addresses form, content

More information

ARCH 121 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURE I WEEK

ARCH 121 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURE I WEEK ARCH 121 INTRODUCTION TO ARCHITECTURE I WEEK 3: Form: Perceptual Laws of Visual Organization (Gestalt Theory) and Compositional Principles (Part 1) From: Roth, L., Understanding Architecture: Its Elements,

More information

Visual Arts and Language Arts. Complementary Learning

Visual Arts and Language Arts. Complementary Learning Visual Arts and Language Arts Complementary Learning Visual arts can enable students to learn more. Schools that invest time and resources in visual arts learning have the potential to increase literacies

More information

HOUSEHOLD GODS: PRIVATE DEVOTION IN ANCIENT GREECE AND ROME BY ALEXANDRA SOFRONIEW

HOUSEHOLD GODS: PRIVATE DEVOTION IN ANCIENT GREECE AND ROME BY ALEXANDRA SOFRONIEW Read Online and Download Ebook HOUSEHOLD GODS: PRIVATE DEVOTION IN ANCIENT GREECE AND ROME BY ALEXANDRA SOFRONIEW DOWNLOAD EBOOK : HOUSEHOLD GODS: PRIVATE DEVOTION IN ANCIENT Click link bellow and free

More information

Range of Competencies

Range of Competencies ART l. ll. lll. Content Domain Range of Competencies Foundations of Art: Elements and Principles 0001 0002 11% Art Media, Tools, Technologies, Techniques, and Processes 0003 0008 33% Visual Arts in Historical

More information

Curriculum Standard One: The student will listen to and analyze music critically, using the vocabulary and language of music.

Curriculum Standard One: The student will listen to and analyze music critically, using the vocabulary and language of music. Curriculum Standard One: The student will listen to and analyze music critically, using the vocabulary and language of music. 1. The student will analyze the uses of elements of music. A. Can the student

More information

GA QCC/Performance Standards for: TALES OF EDGAR ALLAN POE. Seventh Grade

GA QCC/Performance Standards for: TALES OF EDGAR ALLAN POE. Seventh Grade GA QCC/Performance Standards for: TALES OF EDGAR ALLAN POE Seventh Grade All three areas of programming at the Center for Puppetry Arts (performance, puppet-making workshops and Museum) meet Georgia Quality

More information

1. Content Standard: Singing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music Achievement Standard:

1. Content Standard: Singing, alone and with others, a varied repertoire of music Achievement Standard: The School Music Program: A New Vision K-12 Standards, and What They Mean to Music Educators GRADES K-4 Performing, creating, and responding to music are the fundamental music processes in which humans

More information

CST/CAHSEE GRADE 9 ENGLISH-LANGUAGE ARTS (Blueprints adopted by the State Board of Education 10/02)

CST/CAHSEE GRADE 9 ENGLISH-LANGUAGE ARTS (Blueprints adopted by the State Board of Education 10/02) CALIFORNIA CONTENT STANDARDS: READING HSEE Notes 1.0 WORD ANALYSIS, FLUENCY, AND SYSTEMATIC VOCABULARY 8/11 DEVELOPMENT: 7 1.1 Vocabulary and Concept Development: identify and use the literal and figurative

More information

Visual Literacy and Design Principles

Visual Literacy and Design Principles CSC 187 Introduction to 3D Computer Animation Visual Literacy and Design Principles "I do think it is more satisfying to break the rules if you know what the rules are in the first place. And you can break

More information

Early and Middle Childhood / Art. Component 1: Content Knowledge SAMPLE ITEMS AND SCORING RUBRICS

Early and Middle Childhood / Art. Component 1: Content Knowledge SAMPLE ITEMS AND SCORING RUBRICS Early and Middle Childhood / Art Component 1: Content Knowledge SAMPLE ITEMS AND SCORING RUBRICS Prepared by Pearson for submission under contract with the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards

More information

Third Grade Music Curriculum

Third Grade Music Curriculum Third Grade Music Curriculum 3 rd Grade Music Overview Course Description The third-grade music course introduces students to elements of harmony, traditional music notation, and instrument families. The

More information

Music. Last Updated: May 28, 2015, 11:49 am NORTH CAROLINA ESSENTIAL STANDARDS

Music. Last Updated: May 28, 2015, 11:49 am NORTH CAROLINA ESSENTIAL STANDARDS Grade: Kindergarten Course: al Literacy NCES.K.MU.ML.1 - Apply the elements of music and musical techniques in order to sing and play music with NCES.K.MU.ML.1.1 - Exemplify proper technique when singing

More information

LANGAUGE AND LITERATURE EUROPEAN LANDMARKS OF IDENTITY (ELI) GENERAL PRESENTATION OF ELI EDITORIAL POLICY

LANGAUGE AND LITERATURE EUROPEAN LANDMARKS OF IDENTITY (ELI) GENERAL PRESENTATION OF ELI EDITORIAL POLICY LANGAUGE AND LITERATURE EUROPEAN LANDMARKS OF IDENTITY (ELI) GENERAL PRESENTATION OF ELI EDITORIAL POLICY The LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE EUROPEAN LANDMARKS OF IDENTITY journal, referred as ELI Journal, is

More information

Program Learning Outcomes

Program Learning Outcomes 294 Music Definition The Music program is designed to prepare students to transfer as juniors to four year institutions, to perform, to write and record music, and to develop an appreciation of various

More information

DISTRICT 228 INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC SCOPE AND SEQUENCE OF EXPECTED LEARNER OUTCOMES

DISTRICT 228 INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC SCOPE AND SEQUENCE OF EXPECTED LEARNER OUTCOMES DISTRICT 228 INSTRUMENTAL MUSIC SCOPE AND SEQUENCE OF EXPECTED LEARNER OUTCOMES = Skill Introduced NOTE: All skills are continuously developed throughout each grade level after being introduced. LEARNING

More information