Market crash sends tremors through Wharton

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1 ' Q- ^ AJ ^> tmmbtb 1885 Vol. CHI, No. 87 PHILADELPHIA, Thursday, October 22, 1987 Copyright 1987 Tn«Daily P«nntylv»ni»n Market crash sends tremors through Wharton By Katie Ross The massive drop in slock market values this week may not mean another Great Depression, but business students here has been permanent damage done to the psychology of the market. Graduates seeking employment in the finance area will be hardest hit by what Siegel called a "Wall Street shakeout." can expect diminished prospects for inline employment "There will be a reduction in jobs in the finance secand future earnings even if the market substantially This bounce back will not be permanent. I think we'll drift down again. tor," he said, adding that jobs in finance on Wall Street recovers from the shock of the crash, Wharton analysts The market has been permanently wounded by the crash.' have been grossly over-valued for a long time now. said yesterday. The appeal of a businevs education nationwide will pro- The market recovered substantially yesterday, rallying Finance Professor bably diminish, but Siegel said that the effect might be to above the 2000 mark in continued heavy trading on Jeremy Siegel minimal on a lop business school like Wharton. Wall Street. The Dow Jones industrial average rose Siegel added that the majority of those that are worrypoints. Gainers outnumbered losers by nearly 12 to I in the overall tally of New York Stock Exchange-listed issues, with 1666 up, 144 down and 112 unchanged. According to analysts, the rally may have been in response to President Reagan's promise Tuesday night that he would work with Congress in devising a budget compromise. According to some traders, the resurgence is an indication that traders have regained confidence in the market, but Wharton analysis warned that long-term prospects are still uncertain. "There has been permanent damage done to the psychology of the market," Finance Professor Jeremy Siegel said last night. "This bounce back will not be permanent. I think we'll drift down again. The market has been permanently wounded by the Crash." Siegel placed (he probability of a recession next year at over 50 percent, despite the market's positive gains in the last two days. Amidst predictions of a bleak economic climate ate the chilling prospects that college graduates may face diminished chances of securing a job. "It's always bad to hit the job market if there's a recession," Siegel said. On Tuesday Siegel held a forum in the Wharton School addressing future employment prospects in light of the crash. Over 150 appeared for the impromptu discussion, which lasted for an hour and 45 minutes that afternoon. "1 detect a little concern," Siegel said Tuesday evening. "They are very interested in what is going on." Fear about the future is a reasonable reaction to the recent drama on Wall Street, according to Siegel. But barring the possibility of a widespread recession, he said that positive demographic shifts in the employment market can still be expected. ing are MBA students, many of whom have had first hand experience in the job market. Economics Department Chairman Gerard Adams expressed similar views on future employment prospects in finance, but he said that Wharton students have little to fear in the coming years. "There's a general feeling that the enormous demand in the finance area where people used to be able to make a killing is fading a little bit," Adams said last night. "I don't see a problem in actually getting jobs, but some of the exaggerated expectations won't get fulfilled." Please turn lo page II Jobs leaving city, U. report argues By Kalie Ross The economic gap between the city of Philadelphia and the surrounding suburbs is widening according to a report released yesterday by the Wharton School. Written by Chairman of the Public Policy and Management Department Anita Summers and Research Fellow Thomas Luce, the report is the last of three volumes released on a three-year project that compiled and analyzed data trends in business in the eight counties surrounding Philadelphia. The three volumes analyze the factors leading businesses to locate in the surrounding suburbs instead of Philadelphia. The latest report points to inequities in the tax rates between city and suburban counties as an influence on where businesses build their offices and factories. "The book helps us understand why the city has the heavy tax burden that it has," Director of the University's Center for Greater Philadelphia Theodore Hershberg said yesterday. The study points out differing concerns between city and suburban regions, and also indicates their economic interdependence. "The report is saying that we are bound together," Hershberg said. "Economics do not respect the artificial political boundaries that were set up a long time ago." There is an abundance of nontaxable real estate in the city, such as the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the University, Hershberg said, that provides tremendous benefit to the suburban regions, but is a drain on the economy of the city. The resulting lack of funds necessarily drives up city tax rates, making it more difficult for the urban center to compete with the suburban region, Hershberg said. Finance and Economics Professor Robert Inman specifically addrcssm the issue of Philadelphia's wage tax in a chapter of the study. The wage lax can add between 25 and 57 percent to commuters' tax loads. Inman. director of the University's Public Enterprises Resources Program, estimates in the study that this particular tax alone may have cost the city 100,000 jobs since There are other factors that contribute to the disparity, according to the report, including funding by the state of Pennsylvania. "Philadelphia and Pittsburgh gel much less money from the stale than cities in other states of comparable size," Hershberg explained. "The release of the report is very timely as it coincides with a major lax review in Harrisburg." He estimated thai Baltimore and Boston get 38 and 39 percent of their funding from the slate government, whereas Philadelphia and Pittsburgh get 12 and eight percent respectively. "This study comes at a lime when (Federal] government is cutting back on job programs and money to cities," Hershberg said. The Associated Press contributed lo this story. Fumes close Stouffer Dining during lunch By Andrew Chaikivsky Stouffer Dining Commons was evacuated and subsequently closed for lunch yesterday because of a mysterious smell detected in the building. The fumes, which dining service officials said smelled like fuel oil or kerosene, were first detected around the elevator area at approximately 11 a.m., according to Fire and Occupational Safety Manager James Miller. Dining Services Director William Canney said yesterday that the origin of the smell could not be pinpointed immediately and caused a "real problem" for the Department of Environmental Health and Safety. "We didn't know if [the smell] was coming from the outside, or if it was an oil leak,...or a problem with plumbing." Canney said. "We even suspected that the smell was coming from the subway system." Canney said that health officials determined yesterday that the fumes were coming from an outside source and declared Stouffer safe for operation. The dining hall will be open today. A joint decision among Dining Services, Physical Plant and Environmental Health and Safety was reached to close down Stouffer until the afternoon in order lo conduct a full investigation into the origin of the smell, Canney said. "You can't take any chances with something like this," he said, adding that Stouffer is powered by electricity and steam, not gas. Stouffer College House, located above (he dining hall, was not evacuated, Stouffer Administrative Fellow Caroline Ong said yesterday evening. She added that she did not receive any complaints of suspicious fumes in the building. Wawa Food Market, which is also located in the Stouffer Triangle Store, was also unaffected. "It was business as usual all day long," Store Manager Dan Mallon said yesterday evening. Canney added that he will speak with Environmental Health and Safety officials today to find out the exact cause of the smell. Officials from Environmental Health and Safety could not be reached for comment last night. Canney said that food which had already been prepared at Stouffer was transported to 1920 Dining Commons in order to accomodate the larger number of students. College sophomore Dan Nam said yesterday evening thai although he did not notice the smell, he ate at Hill House Dining Commons when he saw that Stouffer was closed. "It was overcroweded and I don't think that (Hill was at a position to accept so many people," Nam said. Jay Brodtky'Daily Pennsylvanian Singing the Dining Service Blues And so hundreds came to the Civic Center for Dining Service's 'We The People' exiravaganza. Aside from peanuts and popcorn. Dining Service aficionados were treated to a rockin' good time by pop star Joan Jett. Moskovits assigned November trial date By Randall I.ane After a three-week case postponement, alleged cocaine trafficker Alexander Moskovits has retained two new lawyers, been granted a new bail hearing and has been assigned a November 30 trial date. Moskovits, who has been in prison for over three months, will have another bail hearing Monday to determine whether he can be released before his trial. The Wharton student has complied with all 11 bail conditions and despite a government appeal of any release, his new lead counsel. Sheldon Sherman said yesterday that Moskovits stands "a very good chance" of being released Monday. A bail decision was postponed during a previous hearing last month after Moskovits requested thai his former attorney, Thomas Bergstrom, be removed from the case. Both the prosecution and the defense stressed lhat the November trial date is tentative. Shenton said that the dale will probably be moved back because he will need more time to prepare Moskovits' case. The trial is being heard by U.S. District Judge Louis Pollak, a former Law School dean. Moskovits is charged with running a multi-million dollar cocaine trafficking ring while attending (he University. If convicted on all counts, Moskovits faces a maximum sentence of life without parole and over $7 million in fines. He is currently being held at Chester County prison. Moskovits, who is one credit short of his undergraduate degree from Wharton, has also been accused in testimony of machine gun use and death threats against potential witnesses. Moskovits has denied all charges of drug trafficking and violence. Shenton, who works in San Diego, Please turn lo page 7 Black unity conference to host Farrakhan By Jenny Not/ The National Black Student Unity Congress, an organization headed by College Senior Conrad Tillard, will host Jesse Jackson and Louis Farrakhan among other speakers this weekend at its second annual conference at Howard University, Washington, DC. Tillard said Tuesday that his main objective this weekend is to attempt a reconciliation between Jackson and Farrakhan, who he said are opposing political forces in the black community. Over 1000 students, including about 60 from the University, are expected to attend the three-day conference, which was organized by the NBSUC in conjunction with the Howard University Student Organization. Entitled "Strategies for Black Empowerment in the 21st Century," the conference will also host actress and talk show host Oprah Winfrey, actor/producer/author Bill Cosby and author Sonia Sanchez. Farrakhan was scheduled to speak at last year's NBSUC conference held at the University, but did not appear after the University refused lo allow Farrakhan's bodyguards to conduct searches of audience members at Irvine Auditorium. The University claimed thai such searches, using hand held metal detectors, would violate rights of personal privacy. Jackson made an unscheduled appearance the next day to more than 600 students. Since last year's conference, presidential candidate Jackson has refused to accept Farrakhan's support of his campaign, according to Tillard. In response, Tillard's organization has called for Jackson to change his position, a stance that has been endorsed by 14 other black student organizations around the nation. "We will urge students to urge Reverend Jackson to reconsider many of his positions, partly in reference to Minister Farrakhan," Tillard said. "If he does not show the appropriate response, then I would not support him and I would advise those who would to be very conditional in their support of him." Tillard said he worked for Jackson this summer but resigned from the campaign after Jackson made negative statements concerning Farrakhan. Tillard will distribute the resolution calling for Jackson's support of Farrakhan to all members of the conference this weekend, according to event organizer Joseph Eure. According to Tillard, Jackson's treatment of Farrakhan is "an indicator of how he will treat the black community in general." The two men have been friends for more than 20 years, Tillard continued. But Farrakhan's controversial speeches, which have led some to accuse him of anti- Please (urn to page 4 Conrad Tillard 'Urge Jackson to reconsider' 'Round Midnight The Penn's men's basketball team began practice for the season with a midnight session at the Palestra. Back page. New Drexel President Drexel University's Board of Trustees yesterday elected an interim president while they conduct a search for a permanent successor to William Gaither, who left the school due to accusations of sexual harassment. Page 2. Gift off the Gab Talking With... a two-act play, opened last night at the Annenberg Center Studio Theatre. Consisting of 11 monologues, the play is a unique opportunity to catch a glimpse at the lives of sorrowful as well as amusing women. Page 3.

2 2 The Daily Pennsyrvanian Thursday, October Make a contribution to life after death. THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION MEMORIAL PROGRAM. <.;Vv>^":/r^ WERE FIGHTING FOR VOURUFE 0 American Heart Association Thtt ipac* provxjod as a public same*?ft Jay Brodaky/Daily Pennsylvanian Welcome to Dining Service No one is sure who was luckier at last night's Dining Service bash students listening to the concert or employees in colonial garb. OCTOBER amn IRILL'.! f & BAR") MONDAY NIGHT TERLINGUA FOOTBALL TUESDAY $.50 DRAFTS $.50 TEXAS RED HOTS - LOUNGE ONLY - DURING THE GAME // SCHEDULE: Oct. 5-sr 49ers at Olants Oct. 12-LA Raiders at Denver Oct. 19-Washlngton at Dallas Oct. 26-LA Rams at Cleveland CHILI'S NEW HOURS: LOUNGE OPEN TILL 1:00 AM MONDAY-THURSDAY 2:00 AM FRIDAY & SATURDAY 12:00 AM SUNDAY Happiness is Lubbock, Texas in my rear view mirror" MARGARITAS $ LOUNGE ONLY -9:00 PM TILL... JTJtX WEDNESDAY- UNIVERSITY CITY NIGHT $ 1.00 ROLLING ROCKS - LOUNGE -9:00 PM TILL... CERVESA THURSDAY $ 1.50 ICE COLD DOS EQUIS - LOUNGE ONLY -9:00 PM TILL... *********** BFAS meets Hackney on center First in series held on black resource center By Debbie Abrams Chairmen and members of the Black Administrators, Faculty and Staff met with President Sheldon Hackney and other administrators yesterday to organize a framework for the development of a black resource center. Senior Vice President Helen 0*Bannon, who also attended the meeting. said last night that the meeting was successful in that it set up a general guideline on how the center will be developed. "I think we've set up an oversight committee to really work out the mission and objective of the Black Resource Center," she said. O'Bannon added that the committee will probably consist of six members: the three chairmen of the BAFS organization and three University administrators. She said that Hackney has not decided which administrators will serve on the committee, or whether he will be on the com- mittee himself. Over the summer, the BAFS held a rally protesting racial discrimination at the University, and asked that a center be established to help deal with the problem. After refusing to approve the center for several months, Hackney reversed his decision this fall. One BAFS request is that a consultant be hired to help "shape what the operation will look like," O'Bannon said. She added that the committee will interview prospective consultants and should be hiring one by the beginning of February. In addition, O'Bannon said that the administration will comply with the BAFS suggestion to have the center under the jurisdiction of the president's office. According to O'Bannon, no other specific suggestions were addressed. She said that the oversight committee will be defining the rest of the goals, logistics and details of the center. BAFS Co-chairman and School of Social Work Associate Dean Peter Vaughan said last night that the meeting accomplished everything on its agenda and that the oversight committee will be working through the semester on the plans. "We will continue to work towards putting into motion a viable black resource center," Vaughan said. "We hope to be well along in the planning steps by the end of the semester." "We will work to achieve the best black resource center possible," Vaughan continued, adding that he is confident in the administration's sincerity in wanting to accomplish the same goals. The meeting, which lasted over an hour, was attended by about 15 members and officers of the BAFS organization, along with Hackney, O'Bannon, Provost Michael Aiken and Assistant Provost Valerie Swain Cade. Drexel interim president named Search for Gaither replacement to begin in January B) Jenny Notz Drexel University's Board of Trustees yesterday announced that life trustee Harold Myers will serve as interim president while the board conducts a search for a more permanent successor to the school's embattled President William Gaither. Gaither stepped down Tuesday, following six months of pressure from Drexel's faculty council and seven deans due to allegations of sexual harrassment and controversy over his leadership style. Myers, a Drexel alumnus who served as a trustee since 1983, began his **<**<**<**< DON'T MAKE A GRAVE ERROR! Remember Hallmark for your Halloween cards. m HOUSTON HALL CARDS* GIFTS HOUSTON HALL HALL 3417 Spruce Lower Level ^*(^(^*,^. TEACH ENGLISH IN CHINA An extraordinary opportunity to live and work for a year in the People's Republic of China. Join Penn's Program for Teaching English at Shanghai Jiao Tong University or Fudan University (outside Shanghai) where you will be provided with free housing, free routine medical care and a living allowance of approx RMB per month. Seniors, students in the graduate/professional schools or graduates of the University of Pennsylvania are eligible to apply. Chinese language not required. INFORMATION MEETING tenure as president yesterday and will occupy the office until December A second yet-to-be-chosen interim president will serve from this time until a permanent leader is selected. A national search for Drexel's ninth president will begin in January, and is expected to last between nine and twelve months. Myers said that he will not seek an extension of his tenure. Following the trustees' announcement, Myers expressed his support of the Drexel faculty and staff and his committment to improving relations among the different factions of the University Community. Myers, Gaither and Board of Trustees Chairman Robert Mc- Clemcnts spoke of the need for Drexel to look towards the future and move beyond the events of earlier this year. "We are committed to getting on with this healing process and getting on with the fundamental purpose of Drexel, which is education," Mc- Clements said. In a letter to the board, Gaither wrote Tuesday that conflicts dividing the University and the Board of Trustees over his leadership style and the direction of Drexel led to his decision not to seek a fifth term as president. The controversy began last spring when a female employee filed a complaint saying that Gaither had placed his hand on her knee during a business dinner. She withdrew the complaint after Gaither apologized for the inci- Do you suffer from RECURRING MOUTH ULCERS? OR COLD SORES? Participants sought for a clinical trial of a new treatment. Contact: GENERAL CLINICAL RESEARCH CENTER UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA dent, which he has said was not intended as a sexual advance. He has denied other allegations of sexual harassment made by two female employees who have since left Drexel. Gaither did not mention the sexual harrassment issue in the letter, and he refused to comment on the allegations yesterday. But, according to Vice President for University Relations Elizabeth Gemmill, Gaither's decision to withdraw was not influenced by the harrassment accusations, as he considers them a dead issue. Myers' appointment was met with support from many faculty members, who lauded his knowledge of the workings of the University. Between 1938 and his retirement in 1982, Myers held nine different administrative positions at Drexel. "He knows the university, and understands how it operates, understands the accepted collegiate relationship between faculty, administrators and trustees," Drexel Professor Vivian Thweal said yesterday. According to Faculty Council Secretary Charles Morshek. the faculty council, who repeatedly called for Gaither's ouster, is drafting a letter of support and gratitude to be sent to Myers and the Board of Trustees. "The relations among faculty members and deans are better than they have ever been before," he said. "The university will be enhanced by this." JV BAskfTDAII TRVOUTS I Rid,\v, OCT.27R<J W.iqhFMtil HAII CyM >:()() pm MUST hui physicals BniNCj Gi AH HELPWANTED By US Government Over 100 Local Jobs, 24 Hour Hotline Prof Med Tech. Admin Sec. US GOVERMENT EMPLOYEE LISTING SERVICE JOBS 99e Mm. toll call Tin US Go* a. EEOC Employ* LANDLORD PROBLEMS? CONSUMER COMPLAINTS? We can help you solve your consumer conflicts. PENN CONSUMERS BOARD Spruce Street S DAEDALUS L* EDUCATION ^ SERVICES Friday, October p.m. Penniman Library 2nd floor, Bennett Hall 34th and Walnut APPLICATION DEADLINE: November 16, 1987 Application forms are available from the Office of International Programs, 133 Bennett Hall. CALL Group Forming for the Treatment off Bulimia Joy Schless, Psy.D. Licensed Clinical Psychologist 19th & Locust Streets Philadelphia, Pa.

3 The Dally Pennsylvania!! Thursday, October 22, 1987 Page 3 Spotlight By Pamela Schulman Talking H'iih... is an enthralling opportunity to listen to the stories, some sorrowful and some amusing, of II extremely different women. The one criticism that can be leveled at the play is the occasionally overdramatic content of the monologues. Review Fridtjof H. Lof»nu»n/Daily Penntytvanian The cast of 'Talking With.' Cast members and director Dana Herman stressed that, though the play consists of monologues by 11 women, the themes dealt with are universal. Higgins' performance is strong, but the script occasionally becomes too poignant to be believeable. In truth, some of the strongest performances are those in which dieting laughter seems to be the main goal, but a great depth of feeling lies just underneath the surface. An excellent example of this is Tamarah Long's "Rodeo," which mourns the great changes in the traditional rodeo circuit. Long elicits constant laughter from the audience, yet there is a strong undercurrent of sadness running throughout the scene. Another highlight of the play is Lisa Silbert's "Audition." This skit, which ends the first act, amuses the audience throughout but manages to come to a conclusion which leaves members feeling extremely disquieted. Silbert's portrayal of a nervous girl trying out for a bit part carefully reels the audience into her life and fears. Unfortunately, the second half of the play does not conclude with such a strong performance. Lisi Phillips' "Marks" lacks a certain amount of spark. Her tale of the boring life which she led before becoming "marked by life" should be one with which the audience easily identifies. But Phillips is unable to bring it home. Sets for the play arc extremely stark, consisting primarily of only a chair and a table, which seems appropriate considering the simple structure of the play. The costumes, which were designed by Barrie Steinberg, are in contrast to the sets extremely realistic. This works well as the focus of the play is the women and not their settings. While the surroundings may not make any statements about the women, their costumes and make-up tell much about the characters. Director Dana Herman's supervision of the actresses' actions, like the costumes, fits in well with the bleak setting. Facial and manual gestures are used substantially while body movement is generally limited. All in all. Talking With... is an excellent opportunity to get to know II unusual yet realistic and touching women. Talking With... will be performed at 8 p.m. tonight and 7 and 9 p.m. tomorrow and Saturday at the Annenberg Center Studio Theatre. particularly considering the relative youth of the actresses playing these women. Sometimes the sheer weight of the In fact, the one attempt at more substantial settings falls monologue weighs too heavily on both the audience and flat. In the second act, in "Lamps," each of the other 10 the actress. women in the cast hold various lamps while Jennifer Killian Page Higgins' "Scraps," about a woman who is Lieberman conducts her monologue. This effect seems slowly going crazy, crosses this barrier to a certain extent. overdone and unnatural. Penny Loafers and Off the Beat to open mouths By Pamela Schulman Never give up hope: battles with the University's bureaucracy can have happy endings, even if the victory is not equally shared by all. For two new University a cappella groups, both of which are presently celebrating their first anniversary, the past year has been a war with only partially successful results. While the Penny Loafers managed to win the war for Student Activities Council recognition. Off the Beat lost its recognition after one year. However, these groups are not letting a little conflict get in their way. This Friday the two will combine for a jamboree, despite the fact that the combined groups lost half their planned-for funding. The victorious 13-member Penny Loafers sing 1950s and early '60s music. This contrasts sharply with the new wave music of their co-performers. Off the Beat. According to Penny Loafers' leader Rachel Hoffman, there is "a pretty even spread" among the types of music that will be performed at the jamboree. This diverse jamboree was almost realized only in the fantasies of the groups' leaders. Finances became a major concern when Off the Beat lost its funding earlier this year. This concern might have been avoided. According to Dave DiFusco, a member of the non-sac funded Off the Beat, the group is somewhat responsible for their loss of official recognition. Members said that because they failed to attend two SAC meetings in a row, their funding was rescinded. "It was by not attending SAC1 meetings that we lost our funding," DiFusco said. "Hopefully we'll get it back." DiFusco said he feels that his group is special and deserves to once again be SAC-funded. One particularly unique aspect of the group is the improvisations they do during each show. A bass begins and each performer introduces his or her own part. "It's probably one of the most nerve-wracking things," DiFusco said. "It's really cool (hat we can do it." 'Home' opens at Annenberg By Deidre Ann Grossman is imprisoned by the authorities when peal in its simplicity and examination A man grows up in the country, he is called to fight for his country of universal emotion. loving the land and the simple rituals and ictuses on the basis of his Both the script and the perforof clandestine bootlegging and local childhood teaching, "Thou shall not mance itself are artistically structured fish fries. He learns the love of a kill." and flow with a rhythm which matwoman and listens to the voice of Once released from jail, Cephus ches the earthiness of the characters decides to leave the country and the and the entire mien of the story. With security of his simple life to go Home, writer Samm-Art Williams Review "where the subway rolls" and where and director Waller Dallas provide he is embraced by the arms of alcohol, the opportunity for a strong and unipreached religion, happily sheltered prostitution and poverty. Yet the que lead role, which actor Tommy from the truths of war, drugs and power of the land and memories call a Hicks seizes and develops with energy hired love. torn Cephus back to Crossroads, an and complex emotion. Home is the story of the coming-of- innocent place of family ties and Although Hicks as Cephus never age of this young man, Cephus Miles, "warm crops." once leaves the stage during the duraa farmer's son from Crossroads. Home is a performance of feeling, tion of the performance, the process North Carolina. Cephus grows up poetry and romantic love. Although it of his maturation is clear at all times with love for the land and strong prin- touches on many contemporary issues through the different mannerisms ciples to live by, living happily until he and problems, the play finds its ap- adopted to represent each stage of his life. He goes from being a boy who speaks affectionately to his dog. flailing his arms with the excitement of the harvest, to an aged man, bent with the weight of life in the city. Actresses Elain Graham and Iris Little-Roberts add to the electricity of the performance by their deft characterization of numerous personalities, both male and female, varying from a shy childhood sweetheart to a noisy local reverend to a spunky city prostitute. All three come together to tell their tales of traditions, community life and innocent love and to celebrate the simplicity of rural life as they dance through the fields of set designer Daniel Boylen's picturesque Home' is about the coming-of-age of a young man farmlands and country fields. The Penny Loafers' story begins back in Arts House about a year ago with Rachel Hoffman, the a cappella group's leader, and her friend Mary Stockdale. The two girls had sung together in the past and decided they would like to form a group. "We used to harmonize together," Hoffman said. "Of course, we both like guys, so we had to make [the group) co-ed." The group began its recruiting by banging on the doors of people in Arts House and were rapidly able to assemble a number of interested people. "We were very lucky," Hoffman said. "The people who happened to be interested were very talented." According to Hoffman, Arts House's contribution to the new group was not only musical, it was also a muchneeded $60 handout. "Arts House gave us a lot of money when we started," Hoffman said. "They were really great." According to Hoffman, this relatively new group has already managed to overbook itself with Friday night per- SHOWTIMES formances every weekend through the end of November, including stops at Yale and Swarthmore. She said that getting a group known requires enthusiasm. "It takes a pushy person," Hoffman said. "You really have to be aggressive." Hoffman said she believes that there will strong turnout at Friday night's show, a fact which she attributes to a great interest among college students in a cappella performances. "There's a really great interest in a cappella singing because it's not as disciplined as a straight play," she said. "There are a lot of songs that everyone knows." The jamboree will also include professionals Glen Berger, a stand-up comedian, and magician Todd Landman. The Haverford Ford Escorts, an all-male a cappella group, will also sing at the jamboree, as well as Harvard's Verilones. Curtain time for the jamboree is 8 p.m. this Friday night. Tickets for the show, which will be held in Harrison Auditorium, are $3 on Locust Walk and $3.50 at the door. THURSDAY Festival Theatre for New Plays. ESTABLISHED PRICE. Annenberg Center Harold Prince Theatre. 8 p. Tickets $15..-».- Penn Union Council Film Alliance. WILD STRAWBERRIES. Irvine Auditorium 10 p.m. Ticket* $2.50. Philadelphia Drama Guild. HOME. Annenberg Center's Zellerbach Theatre. 8 p.m. Tickets $ Theatre Arts. TALKING WITH. Annenberg Center Studio Theater. 8 p.m. Tickets $3. FRIDAY Festival Theatre for New Plays. ESTABLISHED PRICE. Annenberg Center Harold Prince Theatre. 8 p.m. Tickets $15. Off the Beat and Penny Loafers. ORAL MANIFESTATIONS. University Museum. 8 p.m. Tickets $4. Penn Union Council Movies. HANNAH AND HER SISTERS. Irvine Auditorium. 8 and 10 p.m. Tickets $2.50. Penn Union Council Film Alliance. THE HARDER THEY COME. Irvine Auditorium 12 a.m. Ttekata $2.50. Philadelphia Drama Guild. HOME. Annenberg Center's Zellerbach Theatre. 2 and 8 p.m. Tickets $ Theatre Arts. TALKING WITH. Annenberg Center Studio Theater. 7 and 9 p.m. Tickets $3. SATURDAY Festival Theatre for New Plays. ESTABLISHED PRICE. Annenberg Center Harold Prince Theatre. 8 p.m. Penn Union Council Movies. DEBBIE DOES DALLAS. Irvine Auditorium. 8 and 10 p.m. and 12 a.m. Ticket* $2 50 Philadelphia Drama Guild. HOME. Annenberg Center's Zellerbach Theatre. 8 p.m. Tickets $ Theatre Art*. TALKING WITH. Annenberg Center Studio Theater. 7 and 9 p.m. Ticket* $3. SUNDAY Festival Theatre for New Play*. ESTABLISHED PRICE. Annenberg Center Harold Prince Theatre. 8 p.m. Jubilee Convention*. COMIC BOOK AND SCIENCE FICTION CONVENTION. George Washington Hot*. 10 a.m. Tickets $3.. Philadelphia Drama Guild. HOME. Annenberg Center's Zellerbach Theatre. 2 and 8 p.m. Ticka** $14.85.

4 Page 4 Th«Daily Pannayh/anian Thursday. October On Campus CAMPOS EVENTS are ksted daily m a part puttc MTVKS of the UrevwMy of PannsyNania. and are an wart tor tr» Umversrry by Th» Oa*> AamqAaman There s no charge lo aulhoruad University mated groups lor hating* ol FREE avenav l. ngrj may be marled' or cad In parson at The Oraty P»nn»y«vanian Business Offica. 015 Walnut Street from 9 a m to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday Campus Events will not be accepted by phone 25 word Irmrt The Oar/y ParmsytVarnan reserves Via nght lo ecm Campus Events accorrjng to apace hmrtatxms APPLYING TO MEDICAL SCHOOL? Attend an interview workshop on Od Sign up with Jan at Career Planning in Mcfasi. ARMY SURPLUS SALE! Sponsored by the Penn Outing Club Great stuff cheap' On Locust Walk Tuesday. October 20 thru Friday October 23 BLOOMINQDALE S OPERA TONS Training Program is holding an information session Thursday. Oct 22. B-2 Vance Hall at 7PM. Recruiting tor merchandise and financial tramee positions CHOOSING A MAJOR Sophomores, learn how to and which one! October 22 or PM. or November 4. 4: Logan Hal. Register College Advising Offica CHRISTIAN SCIENCE ORGANI- ZATION meats Thursdays from 5 p.m. -6 p.m in the Chapel ol the Chnatian Association located al 36th and Locust Everyone is welcome DON'T MISS MICHAEL ELKIN. Entertainment Editor ot the Jewish Exponent, speaking on Jews and Television Thursday at 8 m HiKel South 30th street GREEK CLUB MEMBERS Come to a meeting followed by Movie Night. 7 30, Thursday October 22 Houston Hall Bowl Room Call Clio tor more into GUIDELINE NEW MEMBERS training session Thursday. October 22 in Bode* Lounge. 7 PM II you can't attend, call Be there Aloha Events TODAY TODAY HONDURAN DOCTOR Juan Alverendez to speak Human Consequnces ol Living in an Occupied Country Christian Association Building 7:30 Thursday Find ou the role ol the U S JOIN US FOR COSBY AND FRIENDS' A relaxing evening with everyone's favorite family Meet new friends and enjoy munchies etc. Grad Tower 'A' Basement KIDDER PEABODY. Corporate Finance Division, is holding an information session Thur Oct 22 in 8-11 Vance Hall at 7:30PM Recruiting for associate intern positions LIBERAL PARTY OF THE PENN Political Union is having a payment meeting Thursday at 7 15 PM in McNeil 103 PENN SKI CLUB Winter Adventures to Park City. Utah and Sugarbush. Vermont One full week of skiing and parrying' Call Brian or Donna PENN THEATRE ARTS DEPART- MENT presents "Talking With a collection of women's monologues. October pm and :00 p m at Annenberg Center's Studio Theatre PUC CONCERTS COMMITTEE MEETING Mandatory if you want lo work backstage Thursday. Oct 22 5pm Bishop While Room. HH. All welcome, especially car owners ST A N D (STUDENTS AGAINST NUCLEAR DESTRUC- TION) meeting al 8 30 p.m. Thursday. Oct 22, above Skolmks at Houston Hall Call STAND Hotline at STATE OF THE ART IN ARAB SCIENCE Or George Saliba. Columbia University, Thursday. Oct Gates Room. Van Pert Library (MEC) THE UNIVERSITY READING Improvement Service announces a study-skills workshop Getting It Down On Paper Essays. Reports and Term Papers' Thurs, Oct 22, 7 00 PM. D Lounge. Stouffer College House Spruce St TRAVELERS INSURANCE COM- PANY is holding an open presentation Thur Oct. 22 Bishop White. HH at 7PM Recruiting for Management Training Program Data processing/computer Science/ Decision Science VOLUNTEER THROUGH COM- MUNITY OUTREACH at the YWCA Play with kids who usually don't get much attention using the YWCA facilities More info call Kelly VOLUNTEER THROUGH COM MUNITY OUTREACH at Holmsburg and Phila Women's Prisons Tutor adult inmates teaching basic English and Math skills More info call Paul PENN ISRAEL ALLIANCE Presents Beat Cafe Loam about Israel's political parties Meet cool people Eat good food Yen's apartment. 606 HRN. Thursday October p m TOMORROW" CASA HISPANICS Cada viernes ven a hablar con nosotros a nuestra tertulia Musica. cafe, y buenos amigos. en espanol. Viernes 4H farde 3940 Locust Walk COME SKATE WITH US 1 Beginners welcome 1 Penn Ice Skating Club meets every Friday 3-4 PM at the rink. 31st and Walnut First meeting Oct 23 For more info. call ISRAEL WINTER BREAK Program tor you! Sixteen fantastic days-jerusalem. Tel Aviv. Ma sada Tour, sea, meet knesset members Great fun! For into call Hani MORTER BOARDER'S OUR FIRST happy hour is Friday, Oct. 23 Irom 4-6PM. at Chili's Don't forget! See you there 1 WEEKEND ARBEL CHORALE. PHILLYS only college-age Jewish choir, now in its 15th year Rehearsals Sunday at 6 30 PM at Hillel Call David No auditions CHEER FOR THE PENN HOCKEY Club in its season opener vs West Chester Saturday. Oct 24 at 5:30 PM Class of 23 rink DANCE DANCE DANCE 1 All invited to mix and mingle in the HRN Rooftop Lounge. Saturday Ocl 24 10:00 p.m. DJ. dancing, refreshments and fun! Free 1 RA sponsored THE STORY OF THE YIDDISH Folksong A Lecture-Recital by Ruth Rubin, author and performer of Yiddish Folksong Wednesday. October PM. Hillel Auditorium CAREERS IN ARTS AND Cultural Management Graduate Career Seminar All welcome 4 30 Ben Franklin Room, Houston Hall. Mon Oct 26 Info INSTITUTE FOR SCIENTIFIC information. University City, seeks proofreaders 13-l5hrs/wk Requires thorough knowledge of English usage Apply ASAP For details sea CPPS books under "Varied " INTERESTED IN MEDICAL School University of Conn will be holding 3 00PM group session sign-ups in CPPS with Jan RUTGERS SCHOOL OF LAW Camden will be on campus Oct. 26th For sign-up see Jan CPPS lower level McNeil THE CENTER FOH LITERACY Chestnut Street, has openings for administration and tutor volunteers Work 3-10hrsTwk Details CPPS books under Education." THE STORY OF THE YIDDISH Folksong A Lecture-Recital by Ruth Rubin, author and performer ol Yiddish Folksong Wednesday. October PM. Hillel Auditorium THE WALL STREET JOURNAL otters reporting and advertising internships for summer 1968 Application and dips (lor reporting internship) due Nov 26th See CPPS books under Journalism" USC GRADUATE SCHOOL of Business will be recruiting on campus on Monday, Oct 26th Sign-up tower level McNeil Bldg Suite 20 34th Street gives you Street Music every Thursday. Drinking on college campuses topic at alcohol and drug forum By R. Paul Herman Michael Green, president of the Collegiate Consultants on Drugs and Alcohol, told a group of organizers of non-alcoholic groups from local universities Friday how he once lost his family, friends and job because of his alcohol addiction. Green, who has established successful non-alcoholic clubs at several universities across the nation, joined other speakers in describing substance abuse and the steps in conquering such addictions at an Alcohol Awareness Week forum held at the Hershey Hotel. The counselor said that his goal in establishing these organizations was to create an outlet for university students to have fun without alcohol. "I took what I learned from Alcoholics Anonymous and went into campus to educate the educators," he said. Green's started his first club at the West Chester University campus. Knowing not many students would venture into his counseling office, Green said he would meet with students at gyms, bars, dining areas and dormitories. He also organized various group activities in order to help problematic college drinkers before their addiction progressed any further. "I tried to show them that you can have fun with good old spirit, not necessarily with spirits," Green said. To counteract Thursday night drinking, a trend popular with many college students. Green formed would promote a good time without drinking. "People came to where the noise was. and they would say 'let's try this!'" Green said of his first party. "Kids then saw the great fun and started saying "it's not so bad.'" After his success on the West Chester campus. Green took the drug and alcohol awareness program across the country to more than 400 other universities, high schools, and grammar schools. "I helped what I thought to be the heaviest drinking university to a program of awareness of possibilities without alcohol," he said. Citing the turnout of dry rush programs at Drexel and Hobart, Green called dry rush an "excellent idea," and he said he believed the policy would be successful. "It's new, making changes, promoling a better quality of people and reducing the concept of drinking to get drunk," he said. Green added, however that the design and implementation of a dry rush policy must have the support of a school's Greek system, athletic department, faculty and administration. Ron Kibbe, Assistant Dean of Students and Director of Greek Life at Drexel University spoke next about the steps being taken at Drexel to promote the drug and alcohol program. Kibbe stressed the need to use reallife examples when educating students about substance abuse. He recounted the story of the death of a Penn State student who, three weeks ago, fell off found to have i blood alcohol content level of 20 -ercent. Ten percent is legally intoxicated. A former Drexel student and recovered alcohol and drug abuser also provided those present at the forum with some personal insights into the life of an addict. "Drug users are devious, conniving, sneaky, slimy people not because they're bad, but because they have a problem," the man, who wished to remain anonymous, said. The recovered alcoholic described his progression from a joint and a beer per day at the age of sixteen in high school to his constant use of cocaine, marijuana and alcohol during the semesters he spent at Drexel. He said he quickly discovered which fraternities liked to 'party,' and subsequently spent all his time with the brothers using alcohol and drugs. Due to his habit* the former Drexel student watched his GPA drop from 1.6 to 0.0. "My whole life revolved around drugs and alcohol." he said. "I never realized I had a problem, because this disease is a disease that tells you that you don't have a disease." After a five-day drug and alcohol binge, the recovered abuser said he finally addressed his problem and joined a rehabilitation program, with the hope of eventually becoming straight and sober. "It was the hardest, but the most rewarding thing in my life," he said. "Anyone who tells you they socially use cocaine, or socially drink, is full of shit. I worked my ass off to get Cheers a non-alcoholic club that the roof of a fraternity house and was straight." Tillard sponsors weekend conference Continued from page 1 Scmitism. has led Jackson to distance himself from the Nation of Islam leader. Jackson has also been troubled by accusations of anti-semitism after it was reported that he referred to New York as "Hymietown" and also because of a meeting he held with Palestinian Liberation Organization leader Yassir Arafat. It is because of Farrakhan's unpopularity with certain mainstream groups in the Democratic parly that Jackson chose to denounce him. Tillard said. "At this point he has not been willing to stand together with his brother, and we as the black community are tired of leadership that is controlled by outside influences," Tillard said. Tillard disputed the idea (hat by associating himself with Farrakhan, Jackson may lose votes in the Democratic primaries. Instead, he said, Jackson is creating a rift in 1 he community by opposing a figure so popular and well-respected among blacks. "The success of the black community will be our unity," he continued. "Our unity has to transcend our ideological barriers." But the NBSUC's position is not intended as an attack against Jackson. Tillard added. "It's not a bitter thing," Tillard said. "We love him, and when you love someone you are willing to criticize him and put him on a proper course." See Jayne cut. See Jayne perm. See Jayne color. See Jayne. TgSPfr WMPKl*4 greo»\c-$cas4 is Served Moh- Fr\."/.-30- io:s aw, ooy m«nu includes egqs, DQCO* sao*** qrha Jayne hairstyling, inc lancaster ave. phila., pa It's time somebody cut the student / body a break. / Bring in this coupon for.1,' special discount on a / haircut that's a cut above the rest. Guys or Gals. OFF Offer good until s May MAG IIAIII -.Ai lrsj 1933 Chestnut St: LO SOUTH STREET IO MON-SAT 11AM-II PM SUNDAY NOON-S PM 7\ Ohm i (fit T)i*m Sprnkt /' MONDAYS - All you can eat /Haiku CMI) JLVJU I TUESDAYS - Sweet and succulent dinner with trimmings... $7.95. JL<du' %jk! WEDNESDAYS - Featuring the entertaining guitarist and singer. John McFodden. All bar drinks»1.00. %uuk! THURSDAYS - All you can eat... $6.95. SPECIALS OFFERED 5:00 PM TO CLOSING 39TH & CHESTNUT STREETS / u S _^U^<a * d?^3* J ulte W «c «* «ctoih*acfa(t». breatxots-f meahiv^s «K opi so p«opl«. WHITE DOG-CAFF Bmeofrfris-V- Lumc^ -Pi hvner. Bar «GTSU 34 Q Scmsor* St-.334-q3a<J'Op»>7ti«ivS Get to know your professors during TAKE YOUR PROFESSOR To LUNCH WEEK October Sponsored by SCUE Obtain lunch discounts up to 50% off at restaurants including: Chilis, Smoke's, Saladalley, Eden, Kelly and Cohen, Marguaritas, O Haras Lee's Hoagies, and The Roost. Bring Penn ID.

5 Official says minorities need better health care By Barbara Thompson The Director ot the icderal government'! Office of Minority Health told a group of siudents and faculty thai "about 59,000 black American! die every year who wouldn't die if blacks had the same health status as while! " Herbert Nickens, who spoke last night at DuBoii (allege House, quoted numerous statistics to show that American minorities have higher incidences ol man) disease! than whites, Nickens, whose department comes under the auspices ol the Department of Health and Human Service! (HSSJ, said that liss termi the difference in ntortalil) rates between whites and minorities ' excess deaths," adding that the government determines this number b> comparing the mortalit) rate of minorities to the standard, or white, mortality rate. "It is fairly depressing, but It's important that we understand because il we don't understand then we icalls can't make changes and that's what [the study of minority health status] is all about." Nickens stated. The doctor told the audience that although improvements in American healthcare have improved absolute minority mot tains rates, these rate! are still proportionally high compared with those of whites. He added that his department is focusing on identi fying the problems of minority healthcare before figuring ways 10 solve the problems themselves. Nickens, a University alumnus, studied at Harvard College before coming here for graduate work in sociology. He said thai he has been with HSS. a relatively young depart- NEED HELP WITH YOUR PROBLEMS? CALL BEA AT 976-L.I.F.E. $1.50 charge per call ment in the federal government, since its creation almost two years ago. The speech, sponsored by DuBois House and the Black Pre-Health Society, centered mainly on the types of health problems suffered by minorities and the causes of them. Most of the causes of mortality, such as cardiovascular disease, homicide, cancer, stioke. diabetes, and infant mortality, generally follow the same trend, the doctor said: the mortality rales of minorities, especially blacks, are as high as three limes the rate of N lilies. Nickens stated that there arc three general areas that contribute to the healthtstatui of a person: individual behavior, knowledge and attitudes; physical environment; and access to the health care system. Wording to the doctor, several causes of the trends have been already been determined, including high smoking and obesity rates. "Obesity is certainly a target," Nickens pointed out. " lnfant mortality! is stubborn issue. There are no simplistic solutions. The issue of povertv always comes up. Poverty has been correlated with poor health since the twelfth century " College senior William Molette, a four-year member of the Black Pre- Health Society, said that he was impiessed by (he amount of individual research done on each possible cause of health trend fluctuation. "I guess what impressed me most wu the fact that the level of detail of conditions ot minorities over all and specific groups was so throroughly broken down." Molette said. SAME DAY SERVICE ON CONTACT LENSES CONTACT LENSES. INC LOCUST ST.»3001 PHILADELPHIA, PA JUDREY'S <\ [PIT 8AR8JCUE] III.. ' \tl3_s0uth 40TH STREfT] F * Mesquite BBQ Ribs, Chicken & Sandwiches one block from Walnut St. TH HAIR HUT 105 S. 41st St (Corner 41st & Chestnut) For Appointment coll " xclusive but not xpensive" Wash tv Cut $11.OO Wash, Cut tv Blow Dry $13.50 Long Hair Extra Cellophones by Sebostion UJc euont you to shine (^ilull^l^l RESUMES f f ^\f ^vy A V~A "Recommended lor Quality" I M 1 ' k # FOR THE FINEST IN 1 1 J!# 1 TYPESETTING & PRINTING 3736 WALNUT ST Si wrtrnm p J (fcj X H II 39 *"x ^^^ WM J I^^JJ Senior Engineering Students WE'RE LOOKING FOR ENGINEERS WITH AN ENTREPRENEURIAL SPIRIT 3907 WALNUT ST - All Work Done On Premises The Management Information Consulting Division of Arthur Andersen & Co needs d speual breed of engineering graduate one who thrives on utilizing a blend of technical expel tise and business Jiumen. One of the world's largest consulting firms, we've doubled in si/e every five years for the past three decades. We proiei t a nri'd lor 3000 managers and 500 new partner* firmvvide over the next five years. That means advancement opportunities are excellent Our'consultant-- receive extensive training and experience in state-of-the-art information systems areas such as: Artificial Intelligence Relational Database Design Integration ol Technologies C omputer Integrated Manufacturing Project Management Syatemi Design & Installation Let's Talk! loin us on Thursday. October 22, 1987 from 7:30 to 9:30 pm in Raisler Lounge, 2nd Floor, Towne Building. Refreshments will be served Bring your resume..arthur ANDERSEN Equal Opportunity Employei N The Daily Penntytvanian Thursday, October Page 5 tsfc ^e Penny Loafers and Off the Beat 8PM University Museum SAC Funded V Q speech fcy Michael ElKtn- En-rcr+ainmen-r Ed.+t*- Of -The TeiOtsU Exponent V \ 0 <S> t 3923 Walnut St Turn your Mac disk into a typesetter. LaserWrite it at. Kinko's WHEN' ThursdO-y, Oc-tobe<M. 6> prr\ VJHE&E- MW Aud.torum aoa s. lu^ St. SPONSORED BY. Hi tlel * Acfcrm 3Ctw* «Hr\t\ J J \ ^ J 226 S. 40 St IN RECOGNITION OF NATIONAL ADULT IMMUNIZATION AWARENESS WEEK, OCT OCT. 30th, STUDENT HEALTH IS OFFERING THE FOLLOWING IMMUNIZATIONS/ SCREENING SHOW THE WORLD YOU'RE HIP! STRIP ALL YOUR INHIBITIONS AND EXPOSE YOURSELF TO SIX STARTLING NEW ALBUMS FROM CBS RECORDS. II 1. Pre-vaccination screening to determine if immune to hepatitis-b. 2. Flu vaccine. 3. Routine immunizations - measles, mumps, rubella, diptheria, tetanus. * (excluding immunizations for Penn matriculation requirements) PLACE: STUDENT HEALTH DATE: OCT OCT. 29 TIME: 5-8 pm - BY APPT. ONLY CALL TERENCE TRENT DARBY Terence Trent D'Arby's phenomenal debut album, No 1 and platinum in the U.K. and exploding all across Europe with the hit singles. "It You Let Me Stay "and Wishing Well'' WAWANEE Rock n' roll wonder from the land down under Rip up your dance floor with their pulsating smash singles. "Sugar Free" and "Stimulation." WENDY AND USA Wendy And Lisa break away trom the color purple and explore a kaleido scope ol musical influences Irom dreamy funk to high powered rock that shoots from the hip HOOTERS Take the fast lane to high spirited Hooters rock, cnarged with the energy of their sold out concert performances INSIDERS Jackhammer drums and straight ahead guitar drive this rock n' roll virgin like a hot rod with no brakes THE RADIATORS America's spiciest roots rock and swamp band lay down the " Law Of The Fish" on this wildly fan tiopated debut album New musk on CBS Records, Cassettes and Compact Discs. It's the ultimate stimulation tor your student body. WIN A TECHNICS SLP120 CD PLAYER!! TF3ciinics The sc«nce of souid For complete details, just stop into the record store listed below But hurry' The contest ends soon PHILADELPHIA SOUTH STRUT AT 6TM Zmmw m mimtru»» >

6 P«Qe 6 The Dally Pennsylvania!! Thursday. October The Independent Newspaper of the University of Pennsylvania 103rd Year of Publication AMY WESTFELDT. NEWS EDITOR P. DANIEL BIRCH. FINANCIAL MANAGER TAVBSWARTZ. SALES MANAGER JACQUEUN SUFAK. 14TH STREET EDITOR JONATHAN BONDY. SPORTS EDITOR BRET FLAHERTY. PHOTOGRAPHY EDI I 01 MARYANN BORRELLO. Cm EDITOR STACYISQCITH. CREDIT MANAGER JEFFREY CHIMAHOSKY. AD LAYOUT DIRECTOR PAUL MICHAEL. PRODUCTION MANAGER PETERTABACK. 34THSrki i I ENTERIAINMI M EDITOR Copyright 1967 The Daily Pennsytvanian Inc No pan thereof may De reproduced in any torm m whole Of in pan, *ithoul the wntlen consent ol the Business Manage' The Executive Board or The Daily Pennsytvanian has sole authority for the content ol the newspaper No other parlies are in any way responsible lor the content ol the newspaper and all mquries concerning that content should be direcled to the Executive Board at the address which follow THOMAS HILL. EXECUTIVE EDITOR EDWARD SUSSMAN. EniKW Is C'HIhT ROBERT CHASES BUSINESS MANAGER LAURA SHAW. EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR ROBERTPASNAU. NEWS EDITOR TIMOTHY CHIU. Assoc BUSINESS MANAGER CHARLES COHEN. ASSOCIATE EDITOR MICHELLE GREEN. FEATURE EDITOR NEIL WEINBERGER. SPORTS EDITOR ANDREW FRIEDMAN. PHOTOGRAPHY EDITOR TRICIA OBESTER. SPECIAL PROJECTS EDITOR KAREN SHELTON. MARKETING DIRK I I >K ROBYN VOSHARDT. ART DIRECTOR DANIELLEDINENNA. PRODUCTION MANAGER SCOTTSTRAVSS. 34TH STREET FEATURE EDITOR The Daily Pennsytvanian a published Monday through Fr«)ay in Philadelphia PA during the fall and spring semesters, and weekly during summer sessions except during examination and vacation periods Third class postage paid at Philadelphia. PA Subscriptions may be ordered lor $45 00 per academic year al 4015 Walnut Slreet Philadelphia. PA Display and classified advertising may be placed at the same address Business (215) News (215) Put Another $20 in the Jukebox When we heard Dining Services' "We the People" dinner was a Joan Jell concert at the Convention Center, we thought it was a joke. But it wasn't. Not only did the Queen of rock 'n roll perform, but we also got to watch the Penn Quaker, the Glee Club, and get this "mini-bike antics." Not to worry. Dining Services didn't lose money on the venture Director William Canney assures us that the $140,000 that went into the event was already figured into meal contract costs. Translation: each person on meal plan paid about $20 for something they probably didn't want. Money aside, Dining Services forced a multitude of students, too poor to go to Abner's, into attending the festivities by only keeping open the Kings Court/English House and the Law School eating facilities. And let's not forget those students who showed up to Stouffer, or 1920 Commons far more popular eating places than the Law School and Kings Court/English House expecting a quick dinner, but were told they had to go at least five blocks for dinner. Then again, it's the money that really sticks to our ribs. Just think. There's someone at the University who actually gets paid for thinking up these things. Here are some alternative suggestions as to how to spend the $140,000 next time: Add another bathroom to the Steinberg Hotel. Tenure an English professor. Send one of us to Harvard Law School. And with the $20 per person that the shindig cost, we could have: Bought the complete works of Bill Shakespeare. Taken a professor to lunch and dinner. Purchased a large amount of bananas from Al the Fruit Man. Fed the homeless. nf AMP I f V KNOW I'M NOT suppose TOUKff HIM... Tied for First Place The first woman, ancient legends tell, was preceded by the first man. Recent allegations of alleged discrimination of women at the University of Pennsylvania suggest the administrative policy is to repeatedly oblige the "first among equals." Unfortunately, today's male-dominated societies are in the process of stifling society and place an enormous burden on future generations. Worldwide change has transformed many traditional values in order to accomodate different societal structures. This transition has relegated many of the "second among equals" to a second-class status. The result has been a subsequent proliferation of one-sided policies in the maledominated community policies that inevitably constrain productivity in society. We all to often fail to realize that our suceeding generations will be adversely affected by our failure to assist in the drive for sexual equality. Which male chauvinist would deny his daughter the opportunity of following in Sally Ride's footsteps and becoming an astronaut? How about a senator? A professor at Penn? None. Yet his short-sightedness and selfinterest indicate otherwise. A piece of paper declaring Affirmative Action for women is a milestone for youngsters' dreams. Failing to follow through with those guidelines destroys those hopes, offering a limited world devoid of savoir faire. It is doubtful any lady can manage to lake on Carl Lewis in a 100 meter dash. On the other hand, it is doubtful any gentleman can undergo a nine-month ordeal that culminates in the birth of a son. Differences exist, but they should be capitalized on to raise societal productivity. The capable ability of women to work in traditionally male-dominated jobs has been proven time and again. Yet time defies the transitional movement of women into these jobs. The late Indira Gandhi governed India's diverse community winning in the process international acclaim. British Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher recently won an unprecedented third term in office. Yet often female politicians (1 have yet to hear of an Iron gentleman-politician) are viewed as weak, too emotional and unreliable. After supporting the Mozambique revolutional forces women were subordinated to second-class citizens following independence. Their military support was greatly appreciated, but they had to remember who were the "first among equals." The Chinese government has rather As the World Turns 5~ Ihiga miraculously managed to control the size of it's huge population. It the male-dominated culture has ignored numerous cases of female infanticide. The future? Bleak for the little boys who may be forced into im- porting wives. In less developed countries, male-dominated governments along with their chauvinist aid organizations implement unproductive economic development programs. Women and children, who are often the backbone of agricultural production, are by-passed when huge industrial projects are started. They miserably wait for assistance which never quite "trickles down" as is expected. Any failure to accomodate women into male organizational structures is an affront to the human race. The costs are high and detrimental to the societies in which we live and work. Members of the "first among equals" should be the first to demand greater sexual equality. Joe Ihiga is a Wharton senior. As the World Turns appears alternate Thursdays. uurrbpf&ktvize'sju.omr/ivftzw O t it t */M/&'...And the Survey Says By Bret Parker Throughoul our lives we are assailed by the results of various polls and surveys. Four out of five doctors surveyed recommend sugarless gum. The number 10 Mall Store which didn't make it is.. Jiffy Spay! Top five answers on the board, here's ihe question.... Truth be told, polls and surveys mean nothing by themselves. It is their presentation to the public which gives them credibility. Governmental candidates predicted to win an election laugh in joy at their opponents. Those on the receiving end of such mockery scoff at the polls, citing their subjective nature, at least until they themselves are predicted to come out on top. Polls and statistics are tossed about with a casual spirit akin to the flushing of a toilet. Thus, at the same time, polls and surveys mean nothing and everything. I have never been the object of a poll. It might be interesting to see how people compare some aspect of my relatively inconsequential life to something of equal or greater importance. Vet, I don't think I would have the stomach to be rated poorly, ranked last or even to get the "thumbs down" from Siskel and Ebert. The front page of USA Today screamed to me last week; it forced me to remember. How damaging could a survey of top universities be? Oops! I forgot. Someone once told me that the University of Pennsylvania is a top University. Was I in for a surprise? You bet I was. Try 19. No, not the drinking age at Smoke's. That is the rank of the University of Pennsylvania accroding to a U.S. News and World Report survey of college presidents. In the National Universities section, 204 schools were included, and about half of the presidents responded. The presidents were searching for the best undergraduate education. The schools were rated by the percent of presidents who named them in the top 10. It will be no surprise to hard-core Penn pessimists. They will not be surprised that we were in the basement of the Ivy League. But $72,000 for an undergraduate education is not the bargain basement: far from it. What will surprise even the staunches! doubters of our school is the other 10 non-ivy schools which were rated above Penn. There has been talk of schools such Bloom County/Berke Breathed wunooopi Hexe 'mi 9<JT omur's fy, 'NPePENPENT NONUNION ANXIETIES as Duke (no. 7) and the University of Chicago (no. 8), but a few universities just crept into the running. This is not to degrade any of these schools, but try a few on for size. University of California at Berkeley was number 5. University of Michigan (Ann Arbor) was lied for number 8. Massachusetts Institute of Technology and the University of North Carolina (Chapel Hill) tied at number 12. Rice University was number 14. University of Virginia was number 15. Johns Hopkins was number 16. Northwestern was number 17. <One could sit down and rationally say that this survey has flaws and repercussions: Perhaps we should A recent poll of college presidents rated the University below the rest of the Ivy League, as well as beneath 10 other non- Ivy schools. 9 examine them. I will do that as soon as I let off some emotional and unscientifically derived steam. Number 19? Ha! I'm embarassed to wear my Penn sweatshirt. I feel as though my parents have been ripped off. What if we are number 19? Why doesn't the administration do something about our image? Why don't students act more like students at a top university instead of parasites hiding under the cloak of the Ivy League. A statistic like this is self-perpetuating. Friends will cite if for years, and we will come to believe it. Those are emotions speaking and they will be our downfall if we give them precedence over our intellects. We can point out the fallibility of surveys. We can point out U.S. News and World Report's continual low rating of Penn over the years. We can combat the survey with an equally ambiguous discussion of SAT scores. We can ignore it and pass it off as nothing, and it really is nothing. It means only as much as people want to believe. However, let us not forget the anger and embarrassment it evokes from some regardless of how true it may nor may not be. Bret Parker is a College sophomore. THIS 616 IS A aosev SHOP/ IF YAlMWNfi not*. wm UHION ' NOW eer our io-me ncxer tine., ANP PONT Fetter TO PAY pves FOK ocroeex' FtOPtfASKm.SO WHAT 3 "V YOUR ANXIETY CLOSET f AMP I SAY. JACKIE PKSXK u wrm M uzi' IFC Meeting To the Editor: Regarding the reporting of fraternity and sorority events, The Daily Pennsytvanian has decided to selectively choose those facts which will support its bias. Several events which have been ignored in the recent articles include the Panhellenic and Interfralernity Councils' sponsoring of an event in conjunction with the Penn Spirit '87 Activities, the all-greek community service project bencfitting the Arthritis Foundation and the Panhellenic Council's expansion process. This campus is in the process of colonizing two additional sororities; women from all over the United States and Canada have been traveling to Penn to discuss their sorority with the Panhellenic. This is big news on a national scale, yet the DP has chosen to ignore it. Why? Are they not newsworthy events or do they just not Fit the image the DP chooses to portray of fraternities and sororities? Keeping this in mind, it is understandable to see why a DP reporter was not allowed to stay at the last Interfraternity Council meeting. The main purpose of (his meeting was to make a statement to the University regarding the recent events involving the hiring of female strippers at fraternity rush functions. Had a representative from the DP been permitted to stay, the coverage of the meeting in the paper would have involved the discussion that took place al the meeting with less emphasis on the end result. The only way to insure that the statement issued by the Interfraternity Council would receive the attention it deserved was to have the reporter leave the meeting. Finally, regarding Thomas Hill's assumptions that I was an uninvited guest at the recent IFC meeting {DP, 10/ 16/87), 1 would like to ask where he is getting his information. Yes, I was present at the meeting, but Tom Hill was not. In his column he states that I was at the meeting to make a statement about the Panhellenic Association's reaction to the recent events. I did not even participate in the discussion. Furthermore, the Panhellenic believes ihe IFC can come to a conclusion about this matter on Letters to the Editor its own. Why was I at the meeting? 1 was there to discuss the joint community service project between the IFC, the Panhellenic Association and the Kite and Key Society to benefit the Eastern Pennsylvania Chapter of the Arthritis Foundation. I asked if 1 could attend before the meeting and have this discussion placed on the agenda, which it was. Again this part of the meeting was ignored by the DP. So when thousands of balloons are launched before the Homecoming Game, and camera crews from the city's major newspapers will be at Penn to cover the event, where will the DP be? LAURA FULLER Engineering and Wharton '88 Panhellenic President Pointless 'Ranting' I was very disturbed to find Gersh Kuntzman's article on the editorial page (DP, 10/15/87). The Daily Pennsytvanian has a reputation for quality, and Kuntzman's article was a glaring exception. Quality newspapers generally apply a number of criteria to an article before it is printed, and normally articles fall into clearly defined categories. I am curious to know what kind of article Kuntzman wrote. Some editors will argue that articles of humor are a separate genre. Nonetheless, some very basic assumptions can be made based on the presence of humor in respected national newspapers. Their humor is intelligent and based on analysis of real people and real situations. Kuntzman humor does not stem from reality; it falls in a vast no-man's land of commentary which is neither irony, nor satire, nor farce. Articles of humor should, at the very least, be well-written and in good taste. Kuntzman's good taste is in question after his ridiculous attacks on religion. If his article was meant to raise any serious philosophical issue, such as God's benevolence, it failed. No substantial points were raised rather, the reader was subjected to many column-inches of ranting. The obvious final criterion for articles of humor is they ought to be humorous; I was hard-pressed to find two people laughing at Kuntzman's comments. Policy on Submissions The Daily Pennsylvanian welcomes comment from ihe University community in the form of columns and letters to ihe editor. All columns, letters and cartoons appearing on this page represent 'he opinions of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the v jews of tne board of managers of The Daily Pennsytvanian. Submissions should be typed double spaced and should be no longer than two pages. The Daily Pennsytvanian reserves the right lo condense all letters and columns. Send submissions to Laura Shaw. Editorial Page Editor. The Daily Pennsylvanian. 4<> s Walnut Street. Philadelphia. PA I find the article to be insensitive, disrespectful, of no journalistic or informative value, and essentially a waste of perfectly good newsprint which could have been much better used in analysis of world events. I am not suggesting content censorship, rather I simply suggest that all articles run have something to say. I support freedom of the press, but not every article written deserves to be printed. This is the category into which Kuntzman's article falls. The DP has a responsibility to its readers and to itself to keep this a quality paper. In running Gersh Kuntzman's article, the newspaper has stumbled in upholding that responsibility. Fed Up JILL KEMPKNAAR College '90 To the Editor: 1 am writing to give my impressions of Dining Services' latest offering. I am comforted lo know that the University spent about $20 per person for meals that are available around campus for $5, and managed to make the meal an unpleasant occasion at the same time. Aside from the insipid food (cold chicken, rubbery steak subs, etc.), the seating arrangements are worthy of comment. Or, as any student who went to the event would say, the lack of seating arrangements. The organizers of this event thoughtfully provided two benches, making seating possible for eight students. Unfortunately, 5000 were expected to attend. To make matters worse, (he students who decided to use the only available seating the floor were repeatedly harassed by the security people at the event. My companions and I were threatened with expulsion if we didn't remain standing throughout this entire event. The harassment made this unpleasant event even more detestable, and, in fact, worse than a typical Dining Services meal quite a difficult feat. STEVEN CAPLAN' College '88 Quotation of the Day ' We have always wanted lo cure the too-high enrollment in the Finance Department. And I think that the market has done that for us already.' Finance Professor Jeremy Siegel.

7 . Moskovits bail hearing Conlinucd from page 1 represented Moskovits after he was extradited from Mexico to California for a previous drug conviction. Moskovits was arrested for possession of over 500 grams of cocaine in 1983 and spent over six months in a Mexican jail after being found guilty. Moskovits has also retained Michael Mustokoff, a partner in the Center City law firm of Duane, Morris and Hecksher, as his local attorney. Mustokoff said yesterday that he and Shenton had not determined how they would split the defense duties. "We haven't really defined what the respective roles are going to be," Mustokoff said. Shenton said Mustokoff would assist him in defending Moskovits, but that he would try the case. The two attorneys said that they have never worked together before. Shenton, who has a private practice, said that his California location would not impair his representation of Moskovits. "It won't affect it at all," Shenton said. "With the jet age today, I'll be there five hours." Shenton added that he would fly in for the bail hearing on Monday and said he was prepared to go to court. Assistant U.S. Attorney Kristin Hayes, who is prosecuting the case, said yesterday that while a bail hearing is scheduled, she was not sure if the defense counsel was ready to procede. Shenton said that he was optimistic that Moskovits will overcome the prosecutor's appeal and be released, especially since Moskovits is in com- pliance with the bail conditions and is willing to post the necessary 10 percent of his $250,000 bail. "The government is crying as usual spill milk," Shenton said. Neither of Moskovits' attorneys wished to elaborate on why Moskovits fired Bcrgstrom or whether Bcrgstrom had done an adequate job. "It's not unusual that sometimes a client doesn't get along with his lawyer," Shenton said, adding that he was not concerned with the matter since it is "all in the past." Shenton and Mustokoff have until November 4 to file any pre-trial motions, Hayes said. Shenton said that he would definitely file motions, and that some of Bergstrom's procedural motions would stand. Bergstrom filed a motion to suppress evidence obtained by a wiretap as well as a motion to force the prosecution to release information found in the discovery process Shenton added (hat he assumes (hat he and Moskosits have a good relationship since Moskovits hired him to be his counsel. Mustokoff said that Moskovits was referred to him "a couple weeks ago." The lawyer, who has practiced law since 1972, would not say who made the referral. He added that while he believed that yesterday was the first day he and Shenton were officially Moskovits' attorneys, they had been in communication with him for some time. Were Fighting For Your Life. o American Heart Association D InnerVision Relaxation Center flotation Tanks, Massage A tourney beyond woidv bey ona thought* An eipenence ot the pure joy and rodiance ol the human tpirit. V A pieaieni way to bstlsi heoiih Relax, roduco il'en, incoase leu awaienen Swednh Deep liim* Shlaltu ^5 1 I ft, * Take the Time fo Look Inside' I 524 S. Third Street Call (215) NOMINATIONS FOR THE LINDBACK AWARDS FOR DISTINGUISHED TEACHING will be accepted from October 26th through December 4, 1987 Information Available: Office of the Vice Provost 112 College Hall/6303 The Daily Pennsylvanian Thursday. October 22, 1987 Page 7 Brought «*L pan) to Wto GMMWrifcy GETTING IT DOWN ON PAPER: Essays, Reports & Term Papers Thursday, Oct. 22 7:00 p.m. "D' Lounge Stouffer ^ College House ^ 3700 Spruce St. ^ to you by Itw Umvarilty Reading Improvomanl Sl'.lc*»nd th«collsgt Houit Office 31 You! Yes You!! If you're a senior,~c1 l m»*i 14 ' km \ We want to take your picture. Be a art of Poor Richards Record, Yearbook. Sign up now for portrait sittings beginning the week of & October <. i : > * ) To make an appointment Call from 9:30 AM-4:30 PM ' mmmm it's It e m.,. i & Funded by S.A.C. f ;* Receive OPEN BAR from 10 to 3 Show College ID. at the door for your Invasion Night Discount \ Cover Charge $8.00 with College Ife ^u-^v-z w*&.._ oe/y Uo*^ -1 c l,eg! a nt more. EVERY THURSDAY ITS RUSH Ittu, to Ze^" ence, :- ': : '..'. : : :! trip fo r 'wo ' for unive rsity ^sfudent* gra duate pending n \>.; : '.: : -. I : ' ' : irt(. is^^^^tjanu^ ^95.00 a very special place 1215 WALNUT STREET - PHILA., PA A private club for members & their guests u SL'^SL'IS.'.^ Must be 21 with Valid I.D. JYiYiY >o2

8 Page 8 The Daily Pennsylvania Thursday, October Off the Wire Compiled from Associated Press Dispatches World U.S. researcher gets economics Nobel STOCKHOLM, Sweden American researcher Robert Solow won the Nobel Memorial Prize in Economic Sciences yesterday for explaining how savings and technology make an economy grow, Solow. of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge, Mass.. won the prize for a mathematical formula published in 1956 that demonstrated how those two factors, along with labor and capital, affect a nation's economic future. In awarding the prize, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences cited him for "his contributions to the theory of economic growth." A native of Brooklyn, N.Y., Solow was the I5lh American to win the prize since it was created by the Bank of Sweden in Shu.lt/ enthusiastic about arms talks HELSINKI. Finland Secretary of State George Shultz set out for fog-shrouded Moscow by train yesterday and said he was certain he would make headway on arms control in two days of talks with Soviet officials. But he was guarded about arrangements for a third Reagan-Gorbachev summit. "I think we and the Soviets both agree meetings between the top leaders are very desirable." Shultz told a news conference in the Finnish capital. But. he said, summits must be well-prepared "and produce substantive results." Shultz said his team of experts were in "a serious and constructive frame of mind." Government cracks down on Marxists SANTIAGO, Chile The military government has moved to deny Marxists free speech and bar them from jobs as teachers, journalists and labor leaders. Under legislation approved by the ruling junta Tuesday night, the regime will also fine news organizations that publicize the views or activities of Marxists. The legislation is expected to be quickly signed into law by President Augusto Pinochet, the fiercely anti- Communist army commander who seized power in a 1973 coup. It includes a clause calling for the dismissal of moderate political party leaders who seek or accept an alliance with a Marxist group. The bill was seen as an attempt to stifle any Marxist activity in a single-candidate presidential ballot planned by the right-wing government for next year. Pinochet, who ousted the Marxist coalition government of President Salvador Allende, is seen as (he most likely candidate. S. Korean candidate pelted with eggs SEOUL, South Korea The governing party's presidential candidate was hit in the face with eggs and assaulted with tear gas yesterday during campaign stops in an opposition stronghold. Candidate Roh Tae-woo yelled back at the assailants that he would not be intimidated and later joked (hat he considered (he eggs "(he spice of democracy." Bodyguards had (o rush Roh to safety at least four times when protesters pelted him with eggs or lobbed tear gas grenades as he spoke around the southern city of Kwangju. Witnesses said that Roh, the head of the governing Democratic Justice Party, appeared startled but was not hurt. Indians claim a victory in Sri Lanka COLOMBO, Sri Lanka - Indian soldiers fought house-to-house along mined and booby-trapped streets VALUE UP TO $8.00 You and your guest are cordially invited to enjoy one complimentary Entree /Lunch/Dinner, with the purchase of another of equal or greater value. Indian Restaurant 110 South 40th Street, Phila. (215) Please bring this coupon with you of Jaffna town yesterday and captured tall buildings from which Tamil snipers had harried them, Indian officials said. "The Tigers are on the run," Sri Lanka's state radio declared. India appealed to the Liberation Tigers of Tamil Eelam, the main Tamil rebel group, to give up the fight in their last major stronghold. An Indian Embassy spokeswoman said the appeal was being made through loudspeakers. Sri Lankan radio and leaflets dropped on the embattled city 185 miles from Colombo in the heart of the northern Tamil country. The spokeswoman, whose name cannot be used under briefing rules, said intercepted rebel radio messages indicated "a large cadre of the LTTE [Tigers] wants to surrender arms." Priests freed after 11 days in captivity MANAGUA, Nicaragua A Roman Catholic priest said Wednesday that he and another clergyman held by U.S.-supported rebels for 11 days were free, and that they had been threatened and treated poorly during their captivity. In Miami, the rebels said Paul Alan Fisher, an American being held since Saturday, would be freed "as soon as there are secure circumstances." The Rev. Enrique Blandon, a Roman Catholic priest, radioed the Witness for Peace office from Waslala, 118 miles north of Managua, and said he and the Rev. Adolfo Tiffer. a Seventh-day Adventist pastor, had been released yesterday. Contra spokesman Marta Sacasa said in Miami the two were freed in front of several witnesses at a home in El Ocote. about 124 miles north of Managua, and near Waslala. where Blandon and Tiffer live. Nation Reagan reasserts opposition to tax hike WASHINGTON President Reagan sent his top aides yesterday to participate in deficit-reduction talks with Congress but he renewed a hard line against tax increases which Democrats call necessary for progress on the budget. White House Chief of Staff Howard Baker. Treasury Secretary James Baker and presidential budget director James Miller met with congressional leaders of both parties. Their meetings appeared aimed at creating a framework for substantive talks on tax and spending issues. "We're just starting." said James Baker after a meeting with Senate Majority Leader Robert Bvrd. (D-W.Va). Byrd said tax increases were not ruled out in (he mee(ing, and he and other congressional leaders were ready to negotiate "when we hear from the White House that they're ready to proceed." Congressmen fault immigration rules WASHINGTON The Immigration and Naturalization Service issued guidelines yesterday designed to keep families from being broken up under the new immigration law, but several members of Congress said they don't go far enough. The guidelines call for some discretion in allowing handicapped or ill spouses not eligible for amnesty to stay in the country with their husbands or wives who are eligible. They also would allow ineligible children to stay if both their parents qualify under the new immigration law. But at a hearing by the House Judiciary subcommittee on immigration, members asked for blanket amnesty for children with at least one eligible immigrant parent. "I suggesi you reconsider and let all children stay," said Rep. Charles Schumer, (D-N.Y.). Silk $6to$8 values up lo»30 UNIQUE DESIGNS PURE SILK TIES IMPORTED FOULARDS PAISLEYS CREW TIES WOOL CHALLIS REGIMENTAL STRIPES EXTRA LONG TIES BOW TIES (Clip & tie) TENNIS *» FISHING UNIVERSITY TIES Drug increases SAT scores, study says NEW YORK A drug used to control high blood pressure has dramatically improved Scholastic Aptitude Test scores for students suffering from unusually severe anxiety, according to a preliminary study. There is no evidence that the drug will help students who suffer from normal pre-test anxiety, the study's author. Dr. Harris Faigel, said yesterday. Faigel, director of university health services at Brandeis University in Waltham. Mass., said in an interview that over a period of two years he had given propranolol, one of the class of heart drugs called beta blockers, to 25 high school students. They were chosen because IQ tests and other academic evaluations indicated that they had not done as well as they should have on the SAT. When the students re-took the test an hour after taking propranolol, their scores improved by a mean of 50 points on the verbal part of the test and 70 points on the mathematics part. Each part of the multiple choice exam is scored on a scale of Bork nomination incites vicious debate WASHINGTON The Senate opened debate yesterday on Robert Bork's Supreme Court nomination, ready by all accounts to reject his nomination but only after a fierce, highly partisan floor fight. Supporters and opponents of the 60-year-old appellate judge took turns restating oft-repeated themes, focusing on Bork's record and on the intense lobbying campaigns conducted by both sides. President Reagan came under criticism by Bork opponents, who said he politicized the nomination by picking an ideologue. Gregory Peck was denounced by Bork supporters, who said the actor distorted the nominee's record in a television commercial urging his defeat. Study indicates increased airplane risk WASHINGTON The number of near-collision reports involving commercial aircraft jumped nearly 50 percent during the first nine months of this year, according to Federal Aviation Administration figures. There was disagreement yesterday, however, among aviation safety experts on the significance of (he increase on air safety. The chairman of (he National Transportation Safely Board said the sharp rise in near collisions shows that travelers were exposed to an "increased risk" of an aerial collision during the past summer, but (he head of the FAA called the statistical jump "not in itself very meaningful." According to the FAA. the agency received 857 nearcollision reports from pilots during the first nine months of the year, a 37 percent increase over last year. The number of such reports involving planes carrying revenue-paying passengers increased even more sharply from 258 last year to 383 this year, up 48 percent. Colorado shooting didn't make his day BRIGHTON, Colo. The man whose case has become a test of Colorado's "Make My Day" law testified at his murder trial yesterday that he didn't want anybody to die when he shot three people outside his home, but was "scared for my wife." David Guenther's account of what happened the night of April 19, 1986, wrapped up defense testimony at the trial, which began last week and went to the jury Wednesday afternoon. "It's been a nightmare ever since it happened," he said, appearing visibly shaken on the witness stand. "I didn't want nobody to die. I just thought I did what was best at the time." Guenther, 34, is on trial on a charge of second-degree murder in the death of Josslyn Volosin, 26, and on two counts of armed assault for wounding her husband. Michael, 27. and Robbie Wardwell, 27. Ties THINK FALL! London 400 You'll find a surprising selection at London 400. We specialize in corporate logos. Ltd Vine St. (6th fl.) P Hour*: M-F 9:30-4:30 S.I 10-2:30 The Quigmans/Buddy Hickerson For those nights when party guests never leave... It's time to bring out Ronco's Deluxe Power Blower. State After fight, Senate passes recycling bill HARRISBURG After a hectic two-day floor fight, the Senate approved a statewide mandatory recycling bill yesterday, intended lo stem Pennsylvania's trash problems. The trash bill, which has been under consideration in various forms since 1985, would require more than 400 communities with more than 5,000 residents to begin separating household waste for recycling within three years. The bill, approved 39-9, moves (o the House for consideration. Senators generally believed the bill needed further revisions but that it represented a compromise to lessen waste-disposal problems. Several controversial amendments were added to the bill this week, including a measure sponsored by Sen. J. Barry Stout (D-Washington), that gives counties the authority to seal off landfills from outside garbage. City Separated wife demands $23 million A controversy seems lo be brewing over whether (he es(ranged wife of a co-winner of a $46 million Nordi American record lottery prize is entitled to some of the money. Pauline Woomer told The Philadelphia Inquirer she believes she has a right to half of Donald Woomer's share of the jackpot. "Yes, since I'm his wile, I do. I think I'll benefit from it," Mrs. Woomer said. "It's supposed to be a deal." "I'm going to call a lawyer," she said, "as soon as I hang up." Donald Woomer and Linda Despot, 37, of Hollidaysburg, Blair County, received their first of 26 annual payments of $1.4 million. Woomer, 55, is separated bul not divorced from his wife. Weather Today: Mostly sunny, with highs in the mid-50's and light winds are expected. Tomorrow: Partly sunny, with highs ranging from 55 to 60 degrees. THURSDAY NIGHT IS CAMPUS NIGHT AT OHARA'S! Featuring, the entertaining John McFadden Guitarist & Singer ITiursday nights at OHARAS DINING SALOON 3925 WALNUT STREET / for more Info Call THE CHESTNUT 38th & Chestnut Sta. Phlla., Pa. f jp THU 10/22 N FRI. 10/23 ^~ After Flashback. L^TRed Hot Chill Peppers! ^ with Faith No More TOOTS ww & THE MAYTALS SIXTH ANNIVERSARYII L. I 1 six SAT. 10/24 l OOTS & THE MAYTALS SUN. 10/25 SONIC YOUTH FOR ALL AGES C"" - " TUE 10/27 ' "\ f WED 10/28 Jonathan Rlchman I j The Hank Crawford- & Tha Modern Lovara I Jimmy jimi McGrlff Quartet / THU. 10/29 N / FRI. 10/30 N Kid Creole & The Coconuts I After Flashback... j I I Jay & The Techniques I / SAT. 10/31 Df ' TUE. 11/3 N WMMR'S I Jesus & The Mary Chain! Halloween Party I I 11/4 Torn/ ol Powt* 11/11 Kavm EubanKi 11/S JO South* a Kana Bonofl 11/13 Tha Strawta 11/6 Roomful ol BlUM I I'M Johnny W.nlll 11/7 Baru Ravua " "\ g ARTISTIC DIRECTION* FUNDRAISING* FRUSTRATIONS CAREERS IN ARTS AND CULTURAL ADMINISTRATION GREATER PHILADELPHIA CULTURAL ALLIANCE Michael Serkcss, Executive Director PAINTED BRIDE ART CENTER (Jerry (nvish. Director THE UNIVERSITY MUSEUM Allyson Kim/. Acting Registrar Monday, October 26 4:30 p.m. Ben Franklin room Houston Hall A Graduate Career St minar All Welcome ' noiniii i L A e i u i h r CAREER UNIVthS ^ * O ' '[NNS'H'N: Information: 8<)II-7S:)U PUBLIC RELATIONS* CURATORSHIP* INTERNSHIPS m

9 mm The Daily Pennaytvantan Thursday, October 22, 1967 Page 9 Ivy Towers Compiled from the Nation's Collegiate Press Literary societies declare war NEW YORK, N.Y., Oct. 14 In Ihe grandiloquent manner ihal has come to characterize the literary society, the Philolexlians of Columbia University made a formal declaration on Saturday against Princeton's literary group, the Whig-Cliosophics. The declaration came one hour after the 38-8 defeat of the Columbia Lions at the paws of the Princeton Tigers at Palmer Stadium, and was accompanied by the Society's kidnapping of Princeton's tiga mascot, and Ihe storming of Whig-Cliosophic's office in Whig Hall. Thomas Vinciguerra, who graduated from Columbia in 1985, refounder of the Philolexians and author of the declaration, said that the Philolexians declared war in conjunction with the Philomathlans of the University of Pennsylvania. The allied groups, known as the Matho-Lexian Society, had as early as February passed a resolution against the Whig-Cliosophics, "but we just never bothered to inform them of it," according to Vinciguerra. who added, "we've been idle." Vinciguerra noted that the Matho-Lexians had been engaging in a covert war until they had formulated their six articles of war last week, and in the interim had been unable to obtain aid from Washington. "Ollie just buried us with his testimony," he said. The six articles outline a panoply of "transgressions, offenses, and other calumnies" perpetrated by the Whig-Cliosophilics, which, according to the document, include (among others): The defeat of the Columbia Lions for their 35th straight loss. The murder of Alexander Hamilton, a member of the King's College Literary Society, the precursor to Philolexian, by Aaron Burr, a member of the Clio-Sophie Society, later Whig-Cliosophic. "The failure of Brooke Shields, Princeton '87, to obtain a true education at so-called institution of higher learning with which Whig-Clio willingly associates itself..." The Columbia Daily Spectator Senate will postpone Gulf action for now WASHINGTON - The Senate, struggling to finally agree on a formal response to President Reagan's Persian Gulf policy, voted yesterday to delay any substantive decision until at least January. The vote followed a day of confusing parliamentary maneuvers and votes in which the Democraticcontrolled chamber first decided, by a margin, to kill the resolution to delay a decision, then reversed itself. "1 think the Senate looks simply terrible," Senate Majority Leader Robert Byrd (D-W.Va.) a co-sponsor of the resolution, said in criticizing the chamber's past inaction. "This resolution is a pragmatic way to express our will." "We can continue to duck the issue, we can continue to pull our hair, we can continue to castigate the president," said Byrd, "Or we can step up to our responsibilities." Meanwhile, a convoy of reflagged Kuwaiti tankers and American warships steamed south yesterday past the two Iranian oil platforms destroyed by U.S. Navy artillery. Iran renewed its threat of reprisal. Shipping sources in Kuwait reported a loud explosion off the southern coast, near the Mina Saud oil port, but said they did not know the cause. Iraq said its aircraft raided two tankers off Iran one Tuesday night and the other last night but neither strike was confirmed by gulf-based It you are planning to have one or more WISDOM TEETH EXTRACTED and you are in good general health, you may be eligible to participate in a clinical study of a new medication. Participants receive $ For more information call General Clinical Research Center School of Denial Medicine. HOUSE OF OUR OWN BOOKSTORE shipping executives. A senior Iranian diplomat said the response to Monday's attack on the oil platforms would "not necessarily be limited" to the Persian Gulf region, where Iran and Iraq have been at war since September The resolution passed by the Senate and sent to the House seeks a detailed report from Reagan within 30 days after the measure becomes law, answering a variety of questions about his policy of reflagging 11 Kuwaiti tankers and escorting them with Navy ships in (he war-torn gulf. Thirty days after the report was submitted, according to the resolution, the Senate would have to vote either approval or disapproval of Reagan's policy. "This would mean a vote in mid- January," said Byrd. The 60-day period in the resolution would not begin until after the measure becomes law. That would only be after the House passes the bill and if Reagan were to sign it into law. Thus the 60-day period wouldn't likely begin until at least several weeks from now, at the earliest. CAMPUS INDIA restaurant Off the Wire Compiled from Associated Press Dispatches Stocks make big comeback NEW YORK Investors flocked transaction, he said. back to the world's slock markets Trading volume was million yesterday, shaking off a trillion-dollar shares, higher than any day except panic and sending indexes to record Monday and Tuesday, when daily Fed eases money supply; gains in New York, London and volume surpassed 600 million shares. Tokyo. The value of all U.S. stocks, which The Dow Jones industrial average, fell SS03 billion Monday, gained $60 Reagan says he's optimistic climbing halfway back from Mon- billion Tuesday and another $183 WASHINGTON The Federal day's historic 508-point collapse, rose billion yesterday, according to the and making conciliatory gestures Reserve moved again yesterday in an points to 2, The index Wilshire Associates 5,000 Equity Intoward Congress, the focus yesterday had risen a record points dex of stocks traded on the New York apparent further effort to provide was clearly on Federal Reserve Chaireasier money to the nation's banks as Tuesday. and American exchanges and over the man Alan Greenspan, analysts President Reagan voiced optimism suggested. A partial recovery in New York on counter. that the recent market lormoil would Tuesday contributed to record point Market spirits were boosted by the Economists and bank officials said gains Wednesday in indexes on the Federal Reserve's commitment to innot spread through the economy. the Fed apparently injected new cash Tokyo and London slock exchanges. ject money into the financial system As the Dow Jones industrial into the nation's financial system in average rebounded for the second day The improved attitude carried over in- to avoid any crises and by the comlate morning in a further effort to in a row, Reagan called the historic drive down interest rates and reassure to trading in ihe United Slates. mitments of nearly 100 corporations collapse in stock markets "some kind markets. "They're bouncing. They're really to repurchase their own stock. of correction." bouncing," said Andrew Lanyi, The New York Stock Exchange The Fed took similar steps on Tues- When trading closed yesterday, managing director at Ladenburg, continued to restrict computerized day after Greenspan announced the presidential spokesman Marlin Fitz- central bank was ready to "serve as a Thalmann & Co. Inc. program trading, which has been Analysts speculated that investors blamed for wild swings in prices. water said: "We're pleased it's com- source of liquidity." may have been pleased by world The restriction could slow the uping back. We think it shows optimism Yesterday's Fed action, according and strength and we hope the trend leaders' response to the market's ward momentum of stocks, even to analysts, drove down the federal continues." panic, which erased more than $500 though it was intended to slow funds rate, the key rate that banks At the same time, top administra- charge for short-term loans to one billion from the value of U.S. stocks downward momentum. tion officials conferred with congres- another, to between 5 7/8 and 6 1/8 and more than SI trillion from world "It can work for you as well as it sional leaders in an attempt to strike a from the 6V4 rate of late Tuesday. stocks in 24 hours. can against you," said William budget compromise, an overture that That represented a further fall from The Dow industrials' plunge Mon- Howard, an opponent of the limits day wiped out 22.6 percent of the in- who is manager of over-the-counter analysts said was helping to calm fren- the T/i percent rates of Monday. dex's value a bigger one-day trading at Sutro & Co. Inc., a San zied markets. "Thai's clearly the result of the Both the Fed and the administra- Fed's action," said Frank McCordecline than during the crash of Francisco-based brokerage house. tion appeared to be pursuing a course mick, vice president and chief West Germany took a small step On the London Stock Exchange, designed to minimize the damage economist of the Bank of America in this week to hold down its interest the Financial Times-Stock Exchange from the market chaos of earlier in San Franciso. rates, and President Reagan and 100 share index rose a record the week and to keep it from But, he said that Greenspan must leaders of Congress recommitted points to 1,943.8, regaining sightly snowballing into a recession. now walk the narrow line between themselves to whittling away the more than half of its record loss of the federal budget deficit. previous session. "You need to apply the physicians' pursuing a policy of too-easy money, code: first do no harm," said Budget and thus rekindling inflation, or keep- Reagan said yesterday he has not The Tokyo Stock Exchange's Director James Miller. ing monetary policy too tight and coneased his opposition to higher tax 225-share Nikkei stock average shot With the administration lying low. tributing to another recession rates and his chief budget adviser said up a record 2, points flat out that the president "is not going to take a tax increase." Nevertheless, economists said there was no major news event to account Analysts say crash may be good thing for either the plunge or the partial NEW YORK By the time the stock market's recent recovery. -collapse gets into the history books, some Wall Streeters "What happened in the market was see a chance that it will be described not just as a debacle, Wt kind of slid open the shutters a classic case of a financial panic," but as a constructive and pivotal event. said Shafiqul Islam, a senior fellow at But even the most optimistic analysts caution that many to hell to see what it was like.' the Council on Foreign Relations in things have to go right in a high-risk environment for the New York. script to play out that way. Economist David Ressler Advancing issues outnumbered For one thing, answers have to be found to trade and ding a message to Washington, and to policymakers in declining ones by a 8-to-l margin on debt problems that have been resisting solutions for years. other countries. the New York Stock Exchange in very Furthermore, most observers agree that aftershocks "The stock market was threatening to produce a recesheavy trading. That contrasted with from Wall Street's plunge threaten to plague the economy sion all by itself," said Edward Yardeni, economist at Tuesday, when the Dow industrials in the near term, even if the market stabilizes or recovers. Prudential-Bache Securities. gained but losers outnumbered There is some hope, but no assurance, that the economy gainers can ride out that kind of storm. Or as David Ressler, economist at Nomura Securities Stocks also gained on the American Nevertheless, some analysts say it is possible that the International in New York, put it: "We kind of slid open Stock Exchange and in the over-the drop, unlike the Crash of 1929, could ultimately the shutters to hell to see what it was like." counter market, reversing sharp losses work to avert a worldwide recession rather than help to The precise content of the message is a matter of interboth Monday and Tuesday. create one. pretation. But most analysis agree it carried a forceful call "Today it's a much broader rally. They got at least temporary support for that view as for action on the federal budget deficit and on interna- You're getting buying from all of the stock markets staged strong rallies yesterday in Japan and tional trade imbalances and unstable currency markets. country and the world," said Peter then in the United States. As events unfolded, the 508-point drop in the Dow DaPuzzo, head of stock trading for The positive case starts with a reading of Monday's un- Jones industrial average Monday and turmoil in other Shearson Lehman Brothers Inc. precedented selloff as a "vigilante action" by investors financial centers around the world got the attention of Some of the money flowing into dismayed by a lack of progress on the imbalances running political leaders in short order, if not immediately. stocks had probably been in limbo through the world financial system. President Reagan's statemeni Tuesday afternoon that after having been yanked out of the Of course, no investors acting as individuals sold stocks he was willing to work with Congress to try to break the market in the preceding days, DaPuz- at huge losses just to make a political statement. But col- stalemate on the federal budget was welcomed on Wall zo said. It takes five days to settle a lectively, many analysts agree, Monday's sellers were sen- Street CHESTNUT ST.. PHILV, PA.. 191IM Mi IVKD TO NKIV UX.ATION. LARGER SPACE. FULLY RENOVATED. INTERIOR DECORATION, COSY, PLEASANT ATMOSPHERE. LOCATION VEC. IAMB. MEAT. CHICKEN. SHRIMP. BEEF, CHEESE. SPECIALITY.- TAN/XX)HI CHICKEN IROASTEI) SPICY) EAT IN OR TAKE OUT SERVICES. LARGE PARTY ORDERS. SPECIAL! I'M BSSJON FOB STUDENTS WITH THIS AD 20%. s(m'< ml nrmj i Mirtv t uiu <.-.inns Ml >URS 1J Noon lu II pm "GUARANTEED TO BOOST THE PULSE RATE! The Hidden'is a thriller with substance! If you thought 'Terminator' was cool, then go see The Hidden'!" Ron Glnm. robbed 6 banks. 2 Viquoi stores. a record shop Ho* ** tun*** must took over a pot.ee station. Wc\t ^9atlg JemtsgItomtatt wishes to acknowledge the hard work and dedication of Mira Kim Assistant Ad Layout Director Margot Kahn Assistant Credit Manager Gene Scavola Assistant Sales Manager Theatre Arts Program Presents Mike Armsby Assistant Marketing Director Scott Schwartz Assistant Finance Manager 3920 SPRUCE STREET PAUL BUHLE Cultural Historian Founding Editor of the Journals "Radical America" & "Cultural Correspondence Will Autograph and discuss his New Books on Radical History and Popular Cultures Thursday. October 22 5:00-6:30 PM MlMU" 1 * OPENS FRIDAY OCTOBER 30tti AT A THEATER NEAR YOU & new breed 0\ crirninat An 11-Woman Monologue Play October 21, 22 October 23, 24 DIRECTED BY DANA HERMAN 8:00 p.m. 7:00 & 9:00 p.m. In Annenberg Center's Studio Theater Ticket Price $3.00 Tickets Available at Annenberg Box Office

10 Page 10 The Daily Penneytvnlm Thursday, October 22, 1967 Film Alliance presents: Ingmar Bergman's landmark film follows an aged doctor's journey through a compelling landscape of dream and memory as he travels to receive an honorary degree. In Swedish with English subtitles. Short feature: Pas de Deux. 10:00 THURSDAY, OCTOBER 22 ALL SHOWS $2.50 in IRVINE AUDITORIUM Movies presents: WOODY ALLEN Friday, October 23 8:00 and 10:00 SIKNUCITX f. f Oj»ill I "01 u f. UMMISflfO p ALLASS BAMBI W0G0S AS LEoSIt HVWUI AM) HER SISTERS SATURDAY OCTOBER 24 Shows at: 8:00 and 12:00 This report coniains tallies of Part 1 Crimes Against Persons and Summaries of Part I Crimes in the five busiest areas on campus where two or more incidents were reported between October 12, 1987 and October 18, TOTAL CRIMES BY CATEGORY: Crimes Against (he Person 0 Burglaries 13 Thefts 27 Theft of Auto 0 Attempted Thefts of Auto 0 DETAIL LISTINGS BY AREA Number after location reports number of incidents in that area. Listings include only areas where two or more crimes were reported. South lo Walnul/32nd to 33rd (5) 10/12/87, 9:26 a.m. Rittenhouse Lab, Refrigerator taken from locker room. 10/13/87, 4:15 p.m. Huichinson Gym, Male breaking into locker; fled area. 10/13/87, 7:55 p.m. Hutchinson Gym, Two lockers forced open; property taken. 10/14/87, 11:56 a.m. Weightman Hall, Secured bike taken from side of building. 10/17/87, 9:33 a.m. Lot 5, Briefcase and ring taken from auto. Spruce to Locusl/37th to 38th (4) 10/12/87, 11:34 a.m. McNeil Building, Various items taken from locked office. 10/13/87, 9:47 a.m. Vance Hall, Radio and telephone taken from secured room. PLANNED ON INVESTMENT BANKING, BUT... DEBBIE ABRAMS Night Editors KEN COOPERMAN Wire Editor Crime Blotter A Weekly Listing of Campus Crimes EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES IN JAPAN 10/14/87, 9:07 a.m. Vance Hall. Items taken from various rooms. 10/16/87, 7:41 p.m. Steinberg Center, Handbag and two wallets taken. Walnut to Market 361 h lo 38th (4) 10/14/87, 3:09 p.m Chestnut, Two answering machines taken from office. 10/14/87, 4:45 p.m. Gimbel Gym, Wallet taken by male who fled area. 10/14/87, 5:05 p.m. Gimbel Gym. Wallet taken from locker. 10/14/87, 6:21 p.m. Nichols House, Painting taken from wall by unknown person. Spruce to Locust 34th to 36th (3) 10/13/87,9:50 a.m. Williams Hall, Wallet taken from secured area. 10/13/87, 6:26 p.m. Logan Hall, Personal property taken from office area. 10/18/87, 8:47 p.m. Furness Building, Unattended wallet taken by unknown person. Locust to Walnut/36th lo 37th (3) 10/13/87, 11:59 a.m. Colonial Penn Center, Personal items taken from secured area. 10/13/87, 1:19p.m. Phi Sigma Kappa, Personal items taken; possibly by unknown male. 10/18/87, 8:38 a.m. Delta Psi, Television taken from house and found in yard. SAFETY TIP Crime prevention can spare you the costs of crime. It works to the extent you work at it. Avoid being a victim! TWO STRIKES Photo Night Editor THE DIAPER GANG Sports Night Editors OCTAVIO ANTONIO FERNANDEZ Ad Layout Director Bi lingual? Interested In learning about career opportunities in Japan? Shushoku Joho, the employment journal ol Japan, provides Information on opportunities with prestigious Japanese and foreign capital companies operating in Japan. To receive the latest news in career opportunities in Japan, free ol charge, please dial (800) in California; (800) outside California. A service of Recruit U.S.A., Inc. "We Communicate Opportunity" UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA Department of Recreation Recreation Class Registration Second Session Wednesday, October 21, 1987 Thursday, October 22, 1987 Friday, October 23, 1987 AVAILABLE CLASSES: Beginners Swim Adv. Beginners swim Intermediate Swim Speed Swimming Beginners Squash Intermediate Squash Tennis (Beginners Only) Self-Defense 12 PM-4 PM 12 PM-4 PM 12 PM-4 PM Hutch Gym Hutch Gym Hutch Gym New Class not listed in Recreation Class Brochure *JAZZ Fridays 2 PM-3:30 PM Hutch Gym Cost Per Course: $12.00 Penn Students Penn Faculty/Staff Penn Alumni Penn Dependents Affiliates Community Residents *. MUST HAVE I.D. VALIDATED WITH RECREATION STICKER For more Information Call: Hutch Gym Gimble Gym i

11 am Republicans gatherwdiscuss main issues of mayoral race By Hi UaviH David J. I Keksl k..l.1 *s council, and Frank Ri//o Cavanaugh's Bar was (he unlikely is strong enough to deal with it. scene of a gathering of prominent The only problem in this race, as Republican politicians last night. Longstreth sees it, is bringing out the Thacher Longstreth and City Council Republican vote on Election Day. He hopefuls Roy Cibik and Ray Calarese said that he believed that the overwere among the candidates campaign- whelming majority of as-of-now ing at the wine and cheese reception, undecided young white professionals sponsored by Ward leader Matthew would vote for Rizzo. Wolfe. Matthew Wolfe agreed, saying lhat During a brief speech, longstreth the "yuppie" vole is "up for grabs." called the present stale of affairs in Cioode's proposal to raise the City Hall "collective imbecility" and salaries of City Council members also "frustrating." Longstreth said that drew much criticism. Wolfe called the council members are getting involved idea "the most ridiculous thing in international politics, while the anyone's come up with since they problems of Philadelphia are not wanted to sell the Municipal Services given the full attention they deserve. building in the City Hall Annex." Although Frank Rizzo failed to ap- According to Wolfe, City Council pear at the meeting, he was the main members were making $25,000 a year topic of conversation among the four years ago. Since then, the attendants. legislators voted themselves a raise, Longstreth said Rizzo's election bringing their annual salary to would mean a more effective City $40,000. Several Republicans at the Council, adding that not since l%7 meeting concurred that the city canhas the Republican's potential for not afford such expenditures. election been so strong. Roy Calarese, who is running for "With Rizzo as mayor, there will be City Council against incumbent a strong mayor dealing from a strong Councilman Lucian Blackwell, a man position," he said. "More accused by many last night of being Republicans will strengthen that isolated from his constituents, com- mented on the latest poll figures. Calarese said that based on the City Committee's polls, which have only been wrong about an election victory once, if 61 to 69 percent of the average voting electorate turns out on Election Day, 54 percent of the voters will vote for Rizzo, sealing his victory. The mayoral election was not the only topic of conversation among candidates, however. Citing problems with streel cleaning and MOVE, College Republicans member and Philadelphia resident Stephen Geiss said that Wilson Goode's record is not very impressive. "I think Rizzo is more in touch with his constituents than Goode is," Geiss said. Anthony Brooks of the Young Republicans of Philadelphia cited solid waste disposal as one of the city's more pressing problems, saying that something must be done about it or "we will be up to our ears in trash." Brooks added that the trashto-steam disposal method is not only the most viable alternative, but it is safe and it would provide more jobs for Philadelphians. Wharton students fear impact of crash Continued from page "There are plenty of jobs." he added. "But instead ol making $100,000 they'll make $50,000." Adams said that there will be little impact on enrollment in the Wharton School next year, but he said the School might have more trouble raising funds. The University lost $40 million in the dramatic fall on the stock market Monday, when the Dow average plummeted 508 points. Administrators from the Wharton School were unavailable for comment on fundraising prospects last night. For Wharton students, dire predictions are mixed with an unshakable faith that their education will transcend even a desperate economic climate. All are thinking about the future. "It's tough to do your homework with this going on," Wharton MBA student Sarah Oran said yesterday. She added that she was pessimistic about the United States' economy even before the recent crash. "America is very non-competitive right now," Oran said. "The prosperity developed on Wall Street is all paper prosperity. It's not based on any real productiveness or competitiveness." Economic calamity has been waiting beneath the seemingly healthy American economy for years, according to Oran, who said she sees the plummet in market values as having a major long-term impact on the economic climate of the nation and, in turn, the job market. "We as a nation haven't been paying our bills as we go along," Oran said. "Now we're going logo into a sustained contraction. We're not generating enough work to keep Americans happily employed." In the future the average American will either readjust o a four-day work week or the economy will suffer from high unemployment rates, Oran predicted. She said the fundamental cause is administrative. "I think Reagan's knowledge of economic policy is zip zero." Oran said. "Volcker is a genius.... He was very sensitive to the psychology of the market. Greenspan it just cutting his teeth." The future is bleak for business school graduates in the next few years, according to Oran. "My future is more pessimistic," Oran said. "I don't believe firms are going to be anxious to hire a lot of new employees." But Wharton is still a good place to be, she said. "If you have to be somewhere in business school, you better be in one of the top 10 schools." Still, even Wharton graduates could face hard times if the economy goes into a steep decline over the next few years. "It's the general pattern: last hired, first fired." "For people at Wharton this is a very sobering kind of ideo Hifi world thing," Oran said. "A lot of MBA students should maybe change their career plans." If not a full-scale depression of the magnitude felt in the '30s, at least a recession is in store for the nation, Oran said. "We arc going to go into a sustained contraction. Wall Streel may end up contracting permanently " "Even if you're not the one laid off, it's not fun to be in a sluggish economy," Oran added. "It's frightening you're not as secure as you were yesterday," Oran said. "Employment is a long-term thing. Companies decide now who'll they'll employ over the next 10 years." Even Wharton students who were relatively optimistic about the future of the economy said they were aware of the imminent danger to jobs in the finance sector. "I don't think it is really reflective of what is going lo happen to the economy," Wharton and College sophomore Ken Garlikov said this week. "Employment depends on the industry and it won't effect employment in any industry except in the broker's houses." Among Wharton students there was a prevalent feeling that the imminenl drop in the job market has been coming and is well-deserved. "As a country we have been living loo well for too long," said Wharton MBA student Rick Mace, who stress ed that economic rises and falls are a normal pattern of events and that Monday's fall was only significantly different in magnitude. Mace said his main fear is not unemployment, however. "Now we don't have the rapid growth prospects that we have had in the past. What has pulled us out of these bad times before has been the beginning of a war." Mace said he does not consider the Persian Gulf situation volatile enough to be the scene of a major confrontation in the near future, but he added that he wouldn't discount the possibility lhat the government will seek to become involved in a war to salvage an ailing economy. Wharton and Engineering senior Hani Azzouz said thai the economy is headed for a major decline, but he predicted thai it will not happen right away and so will nol be confrontational in nature. He forecasted a gradual but severe stagnation or recession, but not a full-scale depression. "Most MBA students will have a hard time getting a job," he said. "The oversupply of MBAs and finance jobs will shrink by 50 to 60 percent." Still, there is a bright side to the whole scenario, according to some. "We have always wanted to cure ihe too-high enrollment in the Finance Department." Professor Siegel said "And I think that the market has done that for us already." The Daily Pennsylvaman Thursday October Page 11 JOIN THE CLUB NOW FREE AEROBICS This ad is a marketing test. Join the club for 1,2 or 3 months and you can have unlimited aerobics at no extra charge. Hurry, this is a limited ofler. To take advantage of this unusual value you must ask for the free unlimited aerobics when you join the club. Hurry-offer expires this Friday. Oct UNIVERSITY CITY pen s,nce 1978 w> NAUTILUS 4009 Locust Street, Philadelphia Brewers' Outlet BEER & SODA SUPERMARKET ""»:. " V %* i IOOI MOISON GOiDEN ALE (CanaOai HEINEKEN iholandl II& D* GUINESS STOUT (Ireland) WHITBREAD ALE (England, KRONENBOUBG ; Fiance) lowenbrau (Swiss! HANZA (Non»ayl JOHN COURAGE lenglandl HARP (Ireland) WATNEV (England) MACKESON iscoiland) FISCHER (Francel BASS ALE lenglandl K MONCHSOf Germany NEGRA M00EL0 (Menico) MOOSEHEAD (Canaoai ORANJABOOM (Mollandi 0 KEEFE (Canadai MANILA (Pnillipnes) STEINHOUSER (Germanyl BRA0OR MALT (Canadai KONIG PILSNER igermanyl TOOHEY S(Austraka) OOSSER (Austria I GCHONA (Mexico)i KAISERDOM (Germany) KROPF (Germany) SCHOONER (Canadai V nvmi\ f ^^ MIWI ^A* OUTLET 48th & PINE ST. HOIKIIO on sum HIKING «.., Mon.-Thurs. 9 7 Fri. 9-8 Sat 9-7 LARGEST SELECTION OF IMPORTED BEERS FROM ROUND THE WORLD Weekly Beer Specials ~ COOR'S -,-. and * COOR'S LIGHT 12oz. 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NR Bottles 24case Kidder, Peabody^Ca Incorporated cordially invites BOHEMIA (Meicoi NOflWK WOLF LIGHT Sweden) LEEUW (Hoaand) ANCHOR PUS (Germany) ARNOLD (Germanyl LEOPARD (Austria) ASAHl (Japan) BELLHAVEN (Scoilandi BRAHMA ibruit) DRAGON STOUT Uamarca) RED STRIPE UeiTUMca) GRIZZLY (Canada) KULMBACHER MONC (Germany) SAILER IGermany) S Smith Oatmeal Stout I England) Homore imeiicoi F a A Lager (Canada) Swindle IHokandl Sleinlager (New Zealand) Bergei Brau (Germany) Woltbiau igermany) Mountain Crest (Canadai Wieiham (Wales)» #a>a>a>a>*>j»a>*j» «Voted Phila's Best Beer [ and Soda Outlet by Phtla Magazmo University of Pennsylvania Seniors to attend an Information Meeting to discuss the two-year Corporate Finance Associate Intern Program PanasonkiL_r Holiday Sweepstakes Gallery at Market East 9th & Market 3rd level Hours: M,Tu,(107); W,Th,F(IO-9); Sat(10-7); Sun(114) Thursday, October 22, :30 RM Vance Hall Room Bll

12 12 The D«Hy Pennsylvanian Thursday. October NOMINATIONS FOR THE PROVOST AWARD FOR DISTINGUISHED TEACHING Of full-time Associated Faculty or Academic Support Staff will be accepted from October 26th through December 4, 1987 Information Available: Office of the Vice Provost 112 College Hall/6303 Soldiers & Sailors Super Fans & Super Jocks Commandos & Cowboys For costumes you don't have to stash in the closet after Halloween, come to The Original I. Goldberg CAMOUFLAGE JUNGLE PANTS SAILOR SUIT HELMETS' DENIM BOOTS GAS MASKS TEAM JACKETS & TEES DUMMY GRENADES FIELD JACKETS BULLET BELTS ^ THE ORIGINAL SINCE 1919 I.Goldberg ' 0O9 902 rhcctkll CHESTNUT IT ST CT HOURS: M.T.T.S 9:30-6 W8.F 7 *^^ PHILADELPHIA OUR ONLY STORE * LEADING EDGE 8 PRODUCTS LEADING EDGE PRICES BOM - WvVt-. rsv I UHiaod ' 16 MM/1 Ot5 360M>nopp* s 12n HAM ipandatta to '«" on moirwdma Otwn*OCMIto>t087 Fow M-U«flM'-cwnpaatw iptrttcn tj0u S9"v trm ovtim oont Cox* Oatves ma Mewcu** " Mor*x*'OiT* G'apntcs Emutaion 9*"«", MOM KOCVCtWAO* Hjh^itoHAon monoctvemt S«WCT"C tf»tt h»>do*<d MS-DOS' 3 1»n0 GWBASiC* 3 i' nivrfc^tibj ' i S-month * X»' i 000 i *L*yOn'«9«)'«M.xt» : wtfn A** *0Bpv >* "* *»nd.m0w3 tdg»* WO>1 Cwnicaofl Discounts Av»iLM>.«lor Unrvtrtity 01 Ptnn Students Call For Pocaa Hardware Software Accessories Matchwood Shopping Center y 4 Ma'Ctmood Roed Eirton. PA S1495KS'D. n»cs- 'uvvcofyxmuoaw 0 im»iry»tioppy *s»» * J0MS fnm d>* <* * tna.- : s t y -v ra Pnmt g * tr> Sp«*ngCorr«cMn Fufy Conhgu'K! Model D One}'. MOkQ floopy» * Orrve One LMdmgEdoe* manna Memon, Dr-ve * featuring Be*nou» Tertwotooy* T -o romb iamo«ao<e ln»m*a Memory Cartridge* ' I dig Edga Wo#o P'or«i rng nnlfi Spa*ng Cwttm* f >r.t.»j i f t/.t-rr-rli.miin-ihi i When you M one cartndga wit* data pop n a new one 1 loo inem m drawera ia*e nemnome rnahtnern* leading Edge' Model i 2008 Mayea'compaewa modem $ 'juB Hav««*como*t>D>a MorvFri 9:004:00 Saturday 10:00-5: I Versatile Stewart causes problems for opponents Continued from back page one-of-lwo pusses for (hrcc yards and a touchdown. "We do splil him out on occasion," Cozza said of Stewart. "He's very good as a wingback, and plays a lot like (Penn tailback) Chris Flynn." For example. Stewart led Yale (4-1, l-l Ivy League) lo a upset over William and Mary two weeks ago. Not only did he rush for 188 yards and a touchdown and catch a Ryan pass for a score, but he also finished (he day with a game-winning three-yard TD pass to Athanasia off of an option play with 23 seconds to play. But there almost wasn't a last season for Stewart. "Two years ago, I was injured in the Dartmouth game," Stewart said. "I spent some time in the hospital and had to drop two classes. At the end of the semester, I was one credit short." According to Ivy League regulations, football players have only three years of varsity eligibility, so Stewart tried to lake enough credits to make up this deficit. He was still short and was unable to make things up in summer school due to Yale's academic regulations. He was then told that it would be best if he took the academic year off. "It was really my fault," Stewart said. "At the time I really felt a lot of animosity toward Yale." So with a year without school, what was Stewart to do? For two months, he tried Wall Street, working for Brown Brothers and Harriman, an investment banking firm. "I really didn't like Wall Street," Stewart said. "Now I know what to expect when I go into the workforce." Stewart ended up at the University of Kansas, where he was able to make up the necessary credits. He was also able to workout with the Jayhawks' football team. "I worked out with the quarterbacks and receivers," Stewart said. "I gained 25 pounds, and now can say that I am a running back." "I would hope that the off-season away from here helped him," Cozza said. "We missed him a lot last year. "He's an integral part of our total offense. Sometimes we have him out on kickoffs and punts, so he's a part of everything. Because of our scheme of things, tailback is the best place. We knew exactly where wc wanted to put him." This decision hasn't made anything easier for opposing coaches. "To this point," Steele said, "he'll be the best tailback that we'll face." Nebraska runs over Quakers in 52-3 win LINCOLN, Neb. - Nebraska overcame an early Penn field goal and went on to run roughshod over the Quakers The Cornhuskcrs fumbled the opening kickoff, and Penn recovered on Nebraska's 25-yard line. After three plays, Jim Grass kicked a 36-yard field goal. For Penn (2-1), that was it. Nebraska went on to score three firstquarter touchdowns and led 35-3 at halflime. The Quakers held the Cornhuskcrs to just a field goal in I hethird quarter, but Nebraska scored two more touchdowns in the fourth. Tailback Keith Jones carried 23 times for I66 yards and three touchdowns for the Cornhuskers. Wingback Dana Brinson ( ) Quaker Oats Strat-O-Matic Penn at Nebraska and fullback Micah Heibel (8-53-2) led Nebraska's rushing attack that totalled 390 yards on 62 carries. Quarterback Steve Taylor completed 8-of-l5 passes for 61 yards. The Cornhuskers finished with 27 first downs (23 rushing), while the Quakers could manage just 10. Tailbacks Rich Comizio (16 carries for 65 yards) and Chris Flynn (8-41), along with tight end Brent Novoselsky (six catches for 66 yards) were Penn's LOOK s like that time of year. That's right, basketball fans, it's here. Phil and his Diaper Gang started practice last night (this morning) and we all know what (hat means. Next week is Homecoming, and we all know what that means. Fans are starting to think about tickets, and we all know what that means. WHAT does all this mean, you might ask. It means The Line. And speaking of lines, Eric Bernsten crossed the finish line first for the men's cross country team, leading the way to the Big Five title. Bernsten was named Penn's male Athlete of the Week. WE also would like to congratulate Ellen Vagelos for being named Penn's female Athlete of the Week for scoring the winning goal for the field hockey team against Penn State. HAVE faith. We haven't forgotten Bob O'Brien, who was named the EIFL's (that's lightweight football) Player of the Week last week. He also tied with the Penn men's tennis team for last week's male Athlete of the Week. Female honors went to Judy Jaczun. HERE we go, again. Another year in which DPOSTM has to beat up on the Weenies. Only 31 days until Kamin time. Good night. Good V Plenty. only offensive threats. Quarterback Jim Crocicchia completed just 8-of-24 pass attempts for 86 yards and one interception. He was sacked five times. Last week the Quakers' strong defense inside their own live-yard line was the difference in their 20-9 win over Navy. The Midshipmen had three chances deep in Penn's territory but could manage just a field goal before the Quakers opened up a 20-3 lead in the fourth quarter. Flynn (15-90) scored both Penn touchdowns, a one-yard run in the second quarter and an 11-yard run in the fourth. Grass kicked field goals of 36 and 43 yards. Novoselsky (7-96) was the main target of Crocicchia ( yards). PENN Nebraska First Quarter P Grass FG N Jones 4 run N Brinson 13 run N Heibel 6 run, Second Quarter N Knox 5 run. 5:15 N Jones 1 run, 10:45 Third Quarter N FG Fourth Quarter N Jones 14 run N Heibel 14 run A Night practices could help Continued from hack page cold, miserable nights brought the fans together until they formed a living, breathing sixth man inside (he Palestra for the entire season. The same idea might hold true for the'87 - '88 Quakers themselves. Certainly, none of them will be tremendous supporters of frequent midnight meetings at the Palestra. The walk from Superblock to 33rd Street seems to lengthen tenfold once temperatures dip below 40 degrees. Regardless Ol the coach's intent, possible recurrences of Late Night with Tom Schneider is bound to bind the players, though the head coach admitted that future midnight interludes will depend upon how fast the young Quakers develop. SportsQuiz 3 52 Last season. Temple head basketball coach John Chaney routinely ran 6 a.m. practices for the Owls. Related or not, they finished One midnight practice may not propel this season's Quakers to the Final Four. But at the very least, it signifies an attempt to keep Penn one step ahead when everyone else expects the Quakers to slip behind. "It's a way to gel in an extra practice." Beeten said. "We're picking up two hours of leaching time." This year, every minute counts. Thomas Hill is a College senior and executive editor of The Daily Pennsylvanian. His column appears in A Front Row View alternate Thursdays. Think there's no place in business for someone with a liberal arts degree? Think again. r Please send me more information. Name Address A Master's from The Annenberg School of Communications, combined with your bachelor's degree, can take you into a management career in the mass media or telecommunications. Here's what some recent graduates of Annenberg's Master's in Communications Management are doing: Suzanne B., B.A., French, U.C. Berkeley Vice President, Programming Sales, ABC Radio Steve B., B.A., Fine Arts, Ohio University Senior Vice President, Creative Affairs, Columbia Pictures-TV Paul D.. B.A., English. U. Michigan Manager, Marketing and Public Policy, Pacific Bell Sara K.. B.A., Political Science, Duke Director, Creative Services, Assoc. of TV Programming Executives Pam R., B.A., Asian Studies. Mount Holyoke Director, Public Relations, St. Paul Medical Center Karl K B.A., Economics, USC Senior Telecommunications Consultant, Price Waterhouse Wendell R, B.A., Radio/TV/Film. Northwestern Manager, Audience and Syndication Research, Walt Disney Co. HERE ARE TWO WAYS The Annenberg School, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, prepares graduates for their careers. ] Course work in... * management of media firms communications technologies law and public policy international communications diffusion of innovations communication in organizations O On the job learning... * internships in Los Angeles and Washington, D.C. job placement, while in school and after access to alumni network Q; Who is the only black head coach ever in the NFL? We still haven't received an answer, so if you think you know, call tonight after 8 p.m. and ask for Sports. LIKE NO OTHER BUSINESS IN THE WORLD BLOOMINGDALE'S PRESENTS CAREERS IN RETAIL MANAGEMENT Date: Thursday, Oct.22 Time: 7 to 9 pm Location: B-2 Vance Hall A seminar t<> provide straightforward Information and insights into an industry that IlKXWporatesvirtUaUyeVBiyasnectOfthe business careers you're considering merchandising, finance and operations. 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13 Tht Dally Pftnaytvanlfi Thursday, October 22, 1987 Page 13 NHL WALES CONFERENCE Scoreboard WORLD SERIES Gam* 1 Saturday October 17 Minnesota 10. St Louis Patrick Division 1 Game 2 W L T Pta OF GA NY Islanders New Jersey Washington Sunday. October 18 Minnesota 8. St Louis 4 Gam* 3 Tuesday St Louis 3. Minnesota i Gam* 4 Philadelphia Last Night St Louis 7. Minnesota 2 NY Rangers ISeries tied. 2-2) Pittsburgh Game 5 Tonight Minnesota (Blyleven 1-0) at St Louis Adams Division (Cox 0-1 or Magrane 0-1). TBA W L T Pt» C.F r,a Game 6 Boston Saturday St Louis at Minnesota. 4 p m Gam* 7 Montreal Sunday St Louis at Minnesota. 8:25 p m (if Quebec 3 117?1 16 Buffalo Hartlord necessary) Tonight's game will begin after President Reagan's news conference CAMPBELL CONFERENCE ST. LOUIS 7, MINNESOTA 2 rtorris division MINNESOTA ST. LOUIS W L T Pts GF GA ab r h bt ab r h H Chicago ,13?6 Giaddenlf S Colemanlf Detroit ?? Newmn2b Smith si Toronto ?7?fl Baylorph H*rr2b Puckencl Lindmntb Minnesota Gaetti3b McGeecf St Louis b 22 Brunskyrf Penac Hrbektb Oquendrt Smythe Division Laudnerc Lawl«ss3b W L T PU OF GA Buterac Mathewsp Gagness Forschp Edmonton ?9 18 Winnipeg Calgary Vancouver Niekrop Los Angeles Smallyph Frazierp Davdsnph Last Night's Games Viola p Dayleyp Schatzdrp Larkinph Totals Total! Hartlord 5. Buffalo 3 Minnesota Montreal 10. Toronto 3 SiLoms OOx 7 Calgary 5. N Y Rangers 4 Game-Winning RBI Lawless (1). New Jersey 5. Pittsburgh 4 E Puckett, Lindeman. DP St. Louis 1. Chicago S. Detroit 1 LOB Minnesota 10, St. Louil 9 2B McGee. Edmonton 6, Los Angeles 2 Coleman. HR Gagne (1), Lawless (1). SB Boston 5, Vancouver 4 Gaetti(t). Brunansky (1). Coleman (4). Tonight's Games IP H R ER BB SO Minnesota ViolaL Minnesota at Quebec p m Schatzeder Washington at Philadelphia, 7 35 p m Niekro Tomorrows Games Montreal at Buffalo p m Chicago at N Y Rangers p m Pittsburgh at Detroit p.m. N Y Islanders at New Jersey 7 45 p.m Los Angeles at Winnipeg p m Edmonton at Vancouver p m Tuesday's Games NY Islanders 5. Calgary 4 St Louis 6. Winnipeg 2 Frazier StLouis Mathews ForschW DayleyS.l ? HBP Gaetti by Mathewi, Lindeman by Niekro, Puckett by Forsch. WP Mathews. Umpires Home. John McSherry (NL); First. Ken Kaiser (AL); Second. Terry Tata (NL); Third, Dave Phillips (AL); Left. Lee Weyer (NL); Right, Greg Kosc(AL). T 3:11. A SportsWire Compiled from Associated Press Dispatches Cards romp to 7-2 win, even series ST. LOUIS The St. Louis Cardinals produced some power after all and put the pressure in the World Series on the Minnesota Twins. Unlikely hero Tom Lawless hit a three-run home run off Minnesota ace Flank Viola, and the Car- dinals turned fourth-inning fever against the Twins, winning 7-2 last night to even the Series at two games apiece. It was the Cardinals' first homer of the Series, and it couldn't have come from a more unexpected source. It was only the second career homer for Lawless, the first coming with Cincinnati in April 1984 off (hen-atlanta pitcher Ken Dayley, now Lawless' St. Louis teammate who got the save last night with 2Vi innings of one-hit relief. Lawless was the last regular-rosier player in ihe majors to get a hit this season, that coming in August. He finished the season two-for-25, an.080 average and no RBI. Lawless, who watched his homer clear the left- field fence and then threw his bat over his shoulder, said he was just "so happy I got a chance to play. I didn't get to play much during (he season." The homer, he said, was "something I'll remember the rest of my life." The victory assures that the Series will go back to Minneapolis, where the Twins won Ihe first two games in the comfort of the Metrodome. The Twins already are (he fourth straight (earn lo blow a 2-0 lead in games, and history would be against (hem should (he Cardinals win Game 5 tonight, when Danny Cox opposes Bert Blyleven in a rematch of Game 2. The home (cam has never won every game of a seven-game World Series. The Cardinals can become the first team in the '80s to win two World Series. "We weren't supposed to beat the Mets, then the Expos did well and we weren't supposed to beat them, but we did," Lawless said. "It's been that way all year." The Cardinals, overpowered in the first two games as Minnesota scored a total of 13 runs in the fourth inning, showed (hey can play that way, too, combining four hits and three walks in that inning for a 7-1 bulge. "We were long overdue for a big inning," said Willie McGee, who had a two-run double in the fourth. "Occasionally we can do it without Jack Clark and Terry Pendleton." Clark, the Cardinals' leading home run hitter, is out for the Series with torn ankle ligaments. Pendleton, the switch-hitting third baseman who had 98 RBI during the season, has bruised ribs and can only hit left-handed. St. Louis raised more questions about the Twins' ability to win on the road. Minnesota won just nine games away from the Metrodome after the All-Star break before taking two in Detroit in the playoffs. Dayley protected the lead by retiring Gary Gaetti and Tom Brunansky with the bases loaded to end the seventh. Dayley got a save in relief of Bob Forsch, who went 2Vi innings in relief and got his first World Series victory in four decisions. Lawless, a little-used reserve whom Cincinnati traded even-up to Montreal for Pete Rose in 1984, got the Cardinals even with the biggest hit of his career. Tony Pena drew a leadoff walk in the fourth and Jose Oquendo followed with a single. That brought up Lawless, who made just three starts during the regular season but was making his third start in the postseason because of an injury to Pendleton. Lawless lofted an 0-1 pilch high over the left-field fence, setting off a fireworks display over Busch Stadium and in the crowd of 55,347. Viola, seemingly bothered by the 42-degree temperature at the start of the game, kept blowing on his hand to keep warm while the Cardinals kept hilling. Coleman walked one out later and Viola left. With Dan Schatzeder pitching, Coleman stole his fourth base of the Series and Tom Herr was intentionally walked with two outs. Lindeman, who singled home St. Louis' tying run in the third, hit another RBI single and McGee lined a two-run double. Lawless is now three-tor-13 in the postseason. Lindeman, a.208 hitler during the season, is eightfor-20 in the postseason while filling in for Clark. Viola, who gave up one run on five hits in eight innings of the opener, simply did not have it while pitching on three days' rest for the fifth time this year. Viola went to a three-ball count only once in Game 1 but went there twice in the second inning last night and ended up making his earliest exit in 40 starts this season. Cardinals starter Greg Mathews, pitching for the first time in 10 days since pulling a muscle in his right leg during (he playoffs, also struggled as the temperature dropped into the 30s. He gave up Greg Gagne's home run in the third and left in the fourth when the injury flared up. UNLV probe of Daniels case draws no conclusion LAS VEGAS, Nev. A university- sponsored probe into alleged recruiting violations by Nevada-Las Vegas basketball coaches ended with no conclusions drawn, but university officials acknowleged yesterday thai the NCAA could find otherwise. The investigation, inspired by a Newsday article on the recruiting of former New York high school star Lloyd Daniels, will be forwarded to the Pacific Coast Athletic Association and eventually to the NCAA for possible action, UNLV President Robert Maxson said. "It's a report I wish 1 had noor received because it's a report thai says further investigation is necessary," Maxson said. Classified Ads APARTMENTS APARTMENTS APARTMENTS 1 BDR it EFF. UNIVERSITY area Some close to campus Variety ol sizes Call Campus Apts TH AND SPRUCE. Large two bedroom apartment available November 1st Heal, hoi water included Just painted A 44TH ANO SPRUCE 3 bdr apis Secure, spacious Must see to appreciate. Only 2 left. From $595 Call Campus Apts Rooms for Rent Houses and Apartments Rents From $ Month th SPRUCE SUNNY ROOM WITH adjoining study lo sublet Apartment is shared by 2 graduate students Hardwood floors, A/C. laundry, yard Available 11/1/87 Rent $250 plus Call Debby APARTMENT FOR RENT 3BR. $790 PLUS. 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New kitchen, security, available immediately ROOMS IN A STUDENT house available monthly 45th and Locust. 225/mo includes utilities LARGE VICTORIAN TWIN UNIVERSITY AREA ORIGINAL FEATURES Six Bedrooms - 2 Baths Call Roy Jones for par- ticulars Century 21; University Realty TOWNHOUSES and APARTMENTS Largest selection in University City. Range of sizes and prices many newly renovated. All close to campus. Call for details and appointment. Campus Apartments 4043 Walnut Street The UNLV president, however, vowed to "do what is right whatever the inves(iga(ion concludes." Maxson said a four-member com- mittee he appointed lo investigate the allegations found conflicting evidence and could not reach a conclusion either way on any of Ihe alleged viola- tions after six months of interviewing witnesses. "Their report indicates they had contradictory statements, unanswered questions," Maxson said at a news conference. "They reached a point in their report that as lay people, as non- investigators, they had taken the report as far as they could take the report." Maxson said he met Tuesday for more than two hours with Head Coach Jerry Tarkanian and was told by Tarkanian that he wasn't aware of any recruiting violations. "I'm prepared to stand by that," Maxson said. "I'm optimistic. I'm always optimistic." But Maxson said he is also prepared to accept any NCAA or PCAA sanc- tions should either find lhal (here were indeed recruiting violations. "We didn't appoint this committee because we felt like we were being pressured into doing so," he said. "The allegations in the Newsday arti- cle were very serious allegations. Names were named, dates were nam- ed, specific allegations were brought. We felt like we couldn't ignore them." The committee released only a six- paragraph statement on its failure to reach any conclusions. It did not release any reports or copies of inter- views done during the investigation. Maxson said he also had seen only the six-paragraph release, but will eventually release all the committee's findings when the matter is finalized. The Newsday articles, which ap- peared in March while the UNLV basketball team was advancing toward an eventual appearance in the Final Four, alleged thai Daniels ac- cepted illegal payments from UNLV recruiter Mark Warkcmein and (hat Warkentein may have violated NCAA regulations by becoming Daniels' legal guardian. It also alleged that Daniels was given a car and free meals at Las Vegas hotels. The 6-8 Daniels attended four different high schools and never received a degree. He was recruited by UNLV and ended up at a California junior college before transferring to Las Vegas in January. He was kicked out of the program and dropped out of school without ever playing for (he Runnin' Rebels after being arrested in February for buying rock cocaine. 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14 Daily Pennsylvanian pholo Yale's Mike Stewart (18) surprised the Quakers in 1984 when he entered the game lo play quarterback. Sports Page 14 The Dally Pennsylvanian Thursday, October 22, 1987 Yale's versatile Stewart creates problems for opposing coaches By Dan Bollerman Three years ago the Penn football team led Yale 17-0 in the fourth quarter, forcing Elis' head coach Carm Cozza to make a desperate move. In an attempt to kick-start a dormant offense, Cozza replaced starting quarterback Mike Cyr with seldom-used sophomore Mike Stewart. Stewart responded by leading Yale on two long scoring drives, bringing the Elis within five points. But Penn's defense stiffened, and the Quakers won, With the speed and ability to run an option offense, (including a 45-yard run), Stewart had the Quakers perplexed, partly because Penn's coaches hadn't seen Stewart at quarterback in any Yale game-films. "How can you prepare for a guy like Stewart)?" former Penn head coach Jerry Berndt said after the game. "We didn't see him at quarter- back in any of the films. I think when the score was 17-0, and they had that long drive, they found out that they could play with our defense, and that really helped their confidence." With quarterback Kelly Ryan and running backs Stewart, Kevin Brice Opponent Spotlight: Yale's Mike Stewart and Troy Jenkins, the 1987 Elis have so much depth at the skill positions that it is hard to guess how Yale is going to move the ball. "They have a variety of weapons at their disposal," Penn defensive coordinator Gary Steele said. "It makes it so much tougher for a defense to key on any one thing." Ryan (78-of-l yards, nine touchdowns and three interceptions) triggers the Eli offense, and his favorite target, tight end Dean Athanasia, has caught 20 passes for 208 yards and four touchdowns this year. Yet the versatile Stewart stands alone because he could probably fill any of these positions. And, in his two-plus seasons at Yale, he has. "He's an all-around athlete," Cozza said. "He came here as a quarterback, but we want to utilize his talents in a starting role." Now a senior, Stewart has played four positions: tailback, split end, wingback and quarterback the position that Penn's coaches remember Stewart from three years ago. In the Elis' five games this season, Stewart has rushed for 543 yards on 99 carries and three touchdowns. He has also caught 12 passes for 93 yards and two touchdowns, and completed Please turn to page 12 Late Night with the Quakers The pain ripped through Scott Beetcn's leg yesterday the same way the early-season schedule could tear through the Penn men's basketball team. To alleviate his discomfort, Beeten, the Quakers' associate head coach who is nursing a severely pulled hamstring, layed face down on a table in the Munger training room yesterday afternoon with a smoking heating pad slapped on the back of his leg. And to avoid what could be a disastrous start to the Quakers' season, Beeten joined head coach Tom Schneider, assistant coach Gordon Austin and 17 players at the Palestra last night actually this morning for the first practice of the coming season. According to Ivy League regulations, Penn could not practice until today, one week after the the NCAA allows basketball practice to begin. Needing every trump card he can find, Schneider scheduled Penn's initial practice for last midnight. As early as that sounds, practice did not begin a moment too soon. By 11:30 p.m.. 10 players already were on the court loosening up and shooting. The late hour didn't seem to bother most of the players, though a few grumbled because they had ichoolwork to do. "Considering the lifestyle on this campus, it's a lot easier to have them here at midnight than at 7 a.m.." Schneider said before practice began at 12:01 a.m. This is clearly not a normal start to a season. But then again, the upcoming season promises to be anything but normal. Responsibility for the first midnight ride of the Quakers lies firmly with Schneider. But Beeten pointed out that midnight starts are nothing new. When coaching at Maryland, "Lefty" Driesell annually staged a midnight circus on October 15. Basketball supporters would surround the track by Cole Field House with their automobiles, lighting the track with their headlights while the Terrapins began a two-mile midnight run. That of course, signified more of a pep rally than a practice. Seeing how Schneider and Co. didn't announce last night's practice much less open it to the public it's easy to see that A Front Row View Thomas Hill this session was for real, not a serious strategy meeting, but an attempt to gain an edge on a season in which some prognosticators are prepared to throw up the white flag for Penn before the season begins November 28. Check the facts. The Quakers' roster includes three seniors, one junior, four sophomores and eight freshmen. One of the seniors is Jeff Riebel, a transfer student who played as a sophomore in , but missed last season. One of the sophomores is Tyrone Gilliam, a transfer from Rider College, who has never played a game at Penn. And the sophomore class has been thinned by the loss of the Quakers' most tenacious defensive player, Ken Fikes, to academic ineligibility for at least the remainder of this semester. "We'll have to do a lot of things we did not have to do before [in practice)," Beeten said. "We were reviewing rather than teaching. We have to go in there with the attitude that the kids know absolutely nothing, which slows things down some, but we'll catch up." Now check the schedule: the winter promises to come in like a lamb and quickly become a lion. The season opens tamely enough with Lehigh before Penn faces pre-season Big Five favorite La Salic to open a 10-game stretch which includes Cal-lrvinc, UCLA. Georgia Tech. Indiana, Stanford, Temple, Villanova and Notre Dame. "I'm looking forward to seeing how USA Today rales our schedule," Beeten said. "I don't know of too many teams that are playing at Indiana, at Notre Dame, at Villanova, at UCLA, at Cal-lrvine..." That means that Schneider will be sending a team full of untested players like Hassan Duncotnbe, Vince Curran, Ben Spiva and Dane Watts against guys like Lionel Simmons, "Pooh" Richardson and David Rivers. Of course, this schedule did not exactly come of design. A number of these games were scheduled early in the decade. Coming off Penn's 1979 Final Four appearance, scheduling games against Indiana and Georgia Tech probably didn't seem like such a bad idea. Now the schedule looks horrid, but Schneider realizes that he can't do a thing to change it. He can do things to try and cope with it as best he can, like having practice this morning. The key is to inspire the Class of 1991 to the point where losing seven of their first 10 games won't make a dent in their psyches. "Sometimes the enthusiasm of youth overcomes all of the negative things," Beeten said. That theory used to work fine with Penn's basketball fans, whom former head coach Bob Wcinhauer once called "the best college basketball fans in the country." Although The Line has been chopped considerably the last few years, hundreds of Quaker fans once braved a week outside the Palestra to assure themselves of getting season tickets. Somehow, the Please turn to page 12 Tommy Laonardi/Daily Pennsylvanian Penn captain Phil Pills works with Head Coach Tom Schneider in practice last night. Basketball practice opens By Jon Wilner At 12:01 a.m. on October 15, 20,000 University of Kentucky basketball fans gathered in Rupp Arena to watch their beloved Wildcats run through their first practice of the season. Thai's the first official day of practice for all but eight Division I schools. The Ivy League, however, specifies that teams can not begin practice until a week later, on October 22. So this morning at the Palestra at 12:01 a.m., the stands were empty, but the Quakers were there, not wanting to waste any time. Penn head coach Tom Schneider said the reasoning behind the witching-hour practice was twofold. First, it was simply the easiest time to get all 17 players together; second, Schneider used this time to run through drills that would have taken up precious minutes in the first real practice, this evening at 7:30. "We'll use this time to go over drills and get some cohesiveness between all our young players. The kids were itchy," Schneider said. "We have to maximize our time." Schneider blew his whistle at exactly 12:01, and the team gathered aroung the center circle for a brief talk before senior captain Phil Pitts led them on a two-lap jog and stretching exercises. Surprisingly, a few minutes later, Schneider implemented one of the basic motion offenses. Suaan GundOTMn/Daily Pannsylvanian Quaker goalkeeper Mark Tepper has allowed an average of only 0.75 goals per game. Soccer has needed momentum For the Penn soccer team, the Ivy Especially on defense and in goal, Soccer Seven rival Textile a 1-0 loser League remains the barometer of its where Mark Tepper has allowed a to Temple Saturday is fourth. improvement from last season's 1-6 measly 0.75 goals per game. Fortunately for the Quakers, the tourleague mark. The Quakers (2-1-1 Ivies) There are still three Ivy League games nament selection committee has nothing are currently in third place behind Har- and two Philadelphia Soccer Seven to do with the regional rankings. Thus vard (3-0) and Yale (2-0), to each of games left on tap for the Quakers, who Penn can still bypass five of the six whom Penn still must pay a visit. But at know they must win them all to realize teams ahead of it by impressing the the moment, the Quakers, who have not their dream of an NCAA Tournament selection committee. And to do that, the lost in five games, have momentum bid. Quakers believe they must win both the going their way. So, scoreboard watching has become Socer Seven and Ivy titles. "This team has a good sense of a new habit for Penn, who does not This task sounds overwhelming, so themselves," Penn head coach Steve control its own destiny. With a Penn will take things only one league at Baumann said. "They know what they a time. And its next opponent is the Ivy can do and what they can't do, and they League on Saturday. try to do the things they're good at Soccer Notebook "There's nothing more important doing. than winning the Ivy League," Bau- "They've shown an ability to defend Barry Dubrow mann said. "That's where the tradition well (four shutouts in its last five is and that's where we want to excel. If games), and an ability to win games it overall record, the Quakers' situation is we win the Ivies, a bid will come our should win, like Villanova and Cal- tenuous at best. way." Berkeley. That kind of growth is impor- Last weekend's results helped Penn a Next up in the Ivies is Yale. Penn is tant. They work hard as a group and bit in that regard. In Ivy play, Harvard on the road and 0-1 on grass thus defend as a group. Each player has to thumped previously unbeaten Dart- far. put forth a concerted effort to carry this mouth (l-l-l) and Yale shutout Colum- "If we beat Yale, that'll be a feather team." bia, dropping the Lions who shutout for us," Baumann said. "Yale has a The Quakers' success has been a team the Quakers October 3 to 2-2. good tradition of not losing at home, effort. The revolving door at forward Though unbeaten, Yale has five and they're ranked 17th or 18th in the exemplifies this best. Sophomore War- league games to play; Harvard has four. nation this week. Their win over Columren Beiler has recently moved from Penn is banking on them to lose two bia just shows that they can be tough, midfield to forward and responded with games apiece, including the matches and have dangerous players." game-winning goals at Villanova and where each hosts the Quakers. But this morning, Penn finds itself Cal-Berkeley, while junior Chris Bar- "We definitely have to win our last back on lop of the Soccer Seven, by low, despite coming off the bench most five games, but if everyone keeps help- virtue of Philadelphia Textile's 2-0 vicof the season, has been the leading ing us out by losing like they did this tory over Drexel last night. Tied at 3-1 scorer (four goals, two assists). weekend," said senior Paul Mataya, with Textile, the Quakers still must play "We're now playing with a lot of referring to Columbia's loss, "we might Drexel next Tuesday and Temple different combinations up front," Bau- be able to afford a tie. But we pretty November 4. The key is not to lose, not mann explained. "Barlow has started much have to win all five." only because Textile theoretically has its the last three games, but is playing no The dire straits of the Quakers involve tough games Penn, Temple, and more minutes. Richie (Baruch) is our the selection process of the Intecollegi- Drexel behind It, but also because strong target player, and Warren gives ate Soccer Association of America Mid- these games are all Mid-Atlantic games. us a little more technical ability than Atlantic Region selection committee, But any success for Penn hinges upon those two. We're not scoring much, but which is allowed to give NCAA bids to its ability to remain unbeaten in its final we're getting the job done for the most only two teams. Penn is currently five games. It's crunch time for the part." ranked seventh in the region, while Quakers.

15

16 34,h Street MAGAZINE VOLUME 19, NO. 20 CONTENTS ON THE COVER 8/ The Pep Shop Boys Philly's three stooges do the auto parts shuffle. By Scott Strauss. Photographs by Alex Sutton. FEATURE 10/ They Spy New York's almost-monthly bible for the hip uncovers the rich, infamous and ridiculous. By Jacquelin Sufak. Photograph by Francis Gardler. DEPARTMENTS 3/ FOOD: Mom's Homestyle Restaurant This mother's been cooking up a South Street storm, even if she is two men. By Susan Leach and Scott Williams. 4/ SIDESTREETS: Criminal Turncoat Watergate conspirator G. Gordon Liddy is now coaching people on the other side of the law. By Scott Strauss 5/ SPORTS: The Series Fans Forgot This year's Fall Classic is not the stuff of which memories are made By Jon Wilner. 6/ FILM: Suspect Legal beagle Cher discovers udicial misdemeanors and Dennis Quaid. By Jim Gladstone. 12/ MUSIC: Pet Shop Boys This pretty dance band puts out less than muse, but more than sound By Jim Gladstone 14/ BOOKS: Duke Ellington James Lincoln Collier's biography is short on Ellington, long on Collier By Michael Geszel. 15/ THEATER: Sex Tips for Modern Girls This crass musical provides a manual of stereotypes and old 0kes. By Oeidre Ann Grossman. 16/ TUBE: October Jacquelin Sufak Editor Peter Taback Entertainment Editor Alexander Sutton Photography Editor Robin Fields Film Editor Maggie Rosen Books Editor Laura Michaelis Food Editor Francis Mao Statl Amst Scott Strauss Feature Editor Francis Gardler Design Director Marie-Christine Solal Assoc Design Director Gerard Babitts Music Editor Michael Tow Theater Editor Jim Gladstone Contributing Editor Marc Fernich Stafl Writer 34th Street. The Daily Pennsylvania!!. Inc Ho pan: may be reproduced in whole or m pan: without the express consent ol the editors All rights reserved 34th Street published By The Daily Pennsytvaman. Inc Walnut St. Philadelphia. PA every Thursday during the tall and spring semesters. e«- cept during examination and vacation periods One issue is published during the summer Editorial 1215) Business ( STREET EEE3 Suggested reservations By Server 44 These are mj scattered miirs about working in the Food industry I hope you aren't planning on taking them too seriously, bet ause I'm really tired right now The thing is. there an' new guidelines in restaurants these days of which casual diners need to he made aware. Let me say at the outset that when you dine in New York, you're taking a few chances. I was a waiter this summer, not at a Friendlys. thank you very much, hut at a nice restaurant in Manhattan, in the lovely area two blocks north of Times Square. 1 tell you the location, because if von know New York at all. you'll start out with some sympathy for us. and that is today's point. This is one of those places that tries to make dining fun for the customer, and succeeds thunderously when the customer in question has a good and patient sense of humor. Someone who leaves a two percent tip after nine waiters have just sung "Happy Birthday" and delivered a complimentary strawberry crepe to his table has not had a fun time. Someone who spots you laughing quietly at yourself when you pour a frozen daiquiri on an octegenarian and says, "Going to make a career out of being a waiter, son?" is probably having a fun time. Please try and be like the latter customer. Not too many waiters are living out their dream: many are supporting children, parents or expensive drug habits and have no other recourse but the finer foods industry. They have a lot of important things to remember, and restaurant management is rarely on their side. A close friend of mine was sent home on a busy Saturday night, and temporarily fired, for incorrectly garnishing a plate of baby back ribs. She forgot to put on the wilted piece of watermelon appropriate to the dish. applying instead an extremely ripe slice of cantaloupe. Sure, the menu says watermelon, but the fruit's only purpose is to take up space. Let's say you're a customer. Could you hear yourself saying. "Miss, shouldn't this have a piece of watermelon on it?" I mean, no one at your table would want to talk to you, and the waitress, whose choices for revenge are few, might get a busboy to harass you while you are in the bathroom. When you visit a big restaurant, it may be policy to "run" the food. That means that whenever the food for one table is ready, the nearest waiter or waitress "runs" the food to them, so the whole meal is delivered hot or cold oral uh.itevei temperature is most Fitting the dish Til is sounds like it might work to the guest's advantage, sxi epl no one cues too much about anyone else's i ustomers, and god forbid you should ask someone other than your waiter for something, You will get a look in response thai is so truly evil, one would think you asked the waiter to sell his children Into slavery. Customers who insist on things like silverware would be better off rising from their table and heading down the block to a Beefsteak Charlie's for the necessary items. And before you order those fajitas. know that you're putting your waiter in real mortal terror. He will have to run around the restaurant with a sizzling, smoking skillet of shrimp and green peppers screaming. "Hot food right behind you. Hot food Ma'am." all the time paralyzed with mar that an adorable six year old will come bounding at him asking where the bathroom is. Not only is fajita delivery an act which removes all traces of dignity from the profession, but I have plenty of friends with fajita scars and abrasions, and fajita eaters are no better tippers than anyone else. The consolation for the waiter. I suppose, is being able to make fun of the way most people pronounce the word, and taking extra long if. after this ordeal, some wise gu) has the gall to request more guacamole. If you eat in the middle of New York's theater district, most of the people involved in your meal, from bartenders to busboys. think they are the undiscovered future of American musical comedy. These wont-be performers are a lot of fun to work with, hut everything anyone has ever told you about unknown actors is probably true, and you may be better off at a Greek coffee shop where no one can communicate with you. However, addressing a similar issue, if you eat out and don't make some sort of lewd advances to your server, male or female, you are in the company of only 40 percent of New Yorkers. At this restaurant, we wore To M.IK bo Fernich: "The biggest losers in all this are the ex-soldiers,.they paid with their limbs and hearts.'' No, Mr. Fernich. The biggest losers were and are green aprons, with deep pockets that we put all kinds of really gross things in and no one ever knew. We cleaned the silverware by breathing on it. hard, and wiping it off with our sleeves. And. if two people at one table ordered two different drinks that were the same color, there was only one foolproof way of telling them apart. Waiters always carry extra straws. I hope I'm not giving the wrong impression of the restaurant game in the restaurant town. The bottom line is to have a good time, and that's pretty easy for a customer to do. After all. it doesn't take much to sit in a chair and get fed. I'm sure if you thought about it. you'd eventually come to the only sane conclusion, namely, that waiters and waitresses are the most loyal people in the world, and without them, life may as well be a cafeteria. When not beating customers to their own stir-fried shrimp. Server 44 has been known to edit an entertainment section or Ml n STREETEM] the people of Vietnam. Let us not forget Ihem while we are (rightfully) belatedly recognizing the suffering of the vets. Nancy Morris Annenberg School 2 / 34th Street October 22, 1987

17 STREET G333 Going home again Mom's brings back memories By Susan Leach and Scott Williams What's for dinner, Mom?" has long been a grating question posed of matriarchs everywhere. But at Mom's Homestyle Restaurant, you can get an answer without calling home, because this mother plans out her menu a month in advance. Tired of trying to satisfy a wide variety of tastes at every meal, owners oe Quinn and Matt McClernan decided to offer just one meal per night. This daring approach is a part of what makes Mom's a unique dining experience. MOM'S HOMESTYLE RESTAURANT 1713 South St Reservations accepted Prix fixe: $10.95 Located on South Street, west of the hustle and bustle, Mom's really is a touch of home in the big city. While many other of the city's newer restaurants seem to follow the latest trend. Mom's remembers simpler times. The dining room is small and cheerfully decorated with old family photographs and antique mirrors. The atmosphere is re- laxed and the service is friendly. lust don't look too hard for Mom, because you'll find that this kitchen is operated by Quinn and McClernan. But what the illusion lacks in perfection, it makes up for with the food. Our dinner began with fresh rolls, served warm from the oven, followed by a tossed salad of fresh garden vegetables. The entree was a generous portion of chicken pot pie, which came to the table piping hot and loaded with chicken meat, unlike the frozen ones we grew up with. Fresh steamed broccoli and homemade cranberry sauce accompanied the meal. At Mom's, the attention given to even the simplest detail makes the difference. Restaurants that charge twice as much as Mom's and serve canned cranberry sauce are not difficult to find. There is something to be said for actually being able to see the berries, and recognize the unimitatable consistency that comes only with fresh ingredients. When it came time for dessert, our first real dinnertime decision was upon us. Would we go for the apple pie (left over from the night before) or that night's dessert, which was a sundae? We decided to try them both and were generously rewarded. The butternut sundae was en- Slatf Photograph by U»* Button Owners Quinn and McClernon don't look much like June Cleaver or Marian Cunningham joyable vanilla ice cream covered with chocolate sauce and pecans but the hot apple pie was incredible. Thick apple slices with the ultimate sweet crumb topping provided a fine finish to the meal. We both agreed that this was the best apple pie we'd ever eaten. And. just like at home, Mom's offers a bottomless cup of coffee. Still, this restaurant is not for everybody, or for all occasions. If you are looking for a romantic dining experience, or a place to impress an in-law-to-be. you'd The month's menu can be probably be better off else- picked up at the restaurant to where. But if you're looking for allow patrons to match up their a comfortable place that serves optimal dining night and feasimple, quality food, you'll love tured entree. Mom's. For those looking for an alter- Mom's menu changes native to the nightly special. monthly. Thursday's dinner in- Mom's also offers a vegetarian cludes caeser salad, lasagne and salad or a hamburger dinner for lemon sponge cake. If that $5.25. The meal of the day is doesn't get your taste buds tin- fixed at $ gling, you might try Friday's While Mom's does not have a roast chicken or Saturday's beef liquor license, they do encourstroganoff with a dessert of age you to bring your own bread pudding (made from bottle, as well as a friend to scratch). drive you home. CONTEST IMOVIE Long ago. this lovely woman (Katharine Hepburn no question is that easy) made a movie called The Philadelphia Story. In this fine flick. Ms Hepburn's second marriage becomes fodder for the tyrannical Spy magazine, which sends a reporter and a photographer to cover the wedding at the bequest of her ex-husband. Identify the three actors who co-starred with Hepburn in the film, in the three roles mentioned above. The first person to give the correct answer at tonight at 6:02 (NOTE NEW TIME AND NUMBER) will win two movie rentals and one VCP rental (store restrictions apply) from the Movie Ticket. Houston Hall's finest. Loose lips sink ships. 34th Street October 22, 1987 / 3

18 SIDE STREETS Criminal turncoat G. Gordon Liddy offers insiders' tips By Scott Strauss A'Taam. Tinbig kid's back on tinblock. and he's tougher than ever Yes I '..-'ion Liddy has returned to the spotlight, and he's going out of his way to prove that rehabilitation is no empty dream. After serving tiv years in prison the famed Watergate burglar, accomplice has made another foray into the Becurily and investigation fields with the G. (iordon l.iddy Academy of Corporate Security and Private Investigations. That's right, the insuhordi- OSte has turned instructor. For two weeks, the Liddy Academy promises to train interested students in hostage negotiation, counter-terrorism, surveillanc e, self-defense, intelligence and counter-intelligence. And at S2.20O. it's a virtual Meal The traveling course, which made its debut this summer, started in Miami, moved to Los Angeles and Atlanta and ended up with a grand finale in New York. According to Olaf Rankis. vice president of the Academy and an intelligence consultant, there isn't any other security training in the country like Liddy's. "Companies who need people to be trained haven't been satisfied with other types of Kankis says. "Ours is the best We practice field exerhand-to-hand combat, electronic eavesdropping, and weapons training." Liddy and company have hit upon a profitable field spe- ( iali/.ed industrial security The Academy has already attracted an overwhelming response, so much that they've had to turn away potential applicants. And the teachers aren't just any Tom. Dick or Harry, either. The staff includes former Israeli commandos, former Drug Enforcement Agency investigators, security experts and Liddy himself. The typical student's day at the Academy includes a morning seminar in intelligence and counter-intelligence, an afternoon session on counterterrorism and a pre-dinner snack of target practice. Matt Toia. an Academy gra duate from Los Angeles. Uyi that he was easing out of the veterinary business and into the security business. The Academy provided a smooth transition "The students ranged from doctors to stockbrokers. Tinonly requirement was no criml nal record." Toia says "Tnej taught me everything I need to know. Now. i sell counter surveillance equipment and automatic weapons. The course has already paid off it was quite an investment." According to Rankis. the idea of Liddy running a securityschool is. to some, a bit strange. The fact that the mastermind of what many have called a thirdrate burglary is teaching others how to fend off similar intrusions just doesn't cut it. "It is ironic." admits Rankis. "but no one has Liddy's experience and credentials. He's among the top. if not the top man in this field." The Academy is not the only new program started up by Liddy as of late. He also rn Liddy teaches clients how to guard against unlawful entry minded the deadly "Hurricane Force." which is available for hire immediately. This 10-man anti-terrorist group will go anywhere in the world to do just about anything. Made up of Israeli. British and Cuban commandos, the force will save hostages, deliver ransoms and perform the bravest of deeds all for the proper i-ntii i-ment. The trouble-shooters don't come cheap, with prices ranging from $500,000 to $1 million. But according to Rankis. they're worth it. particularly when discretion is key. "We may not call the govern ment every time we get involved in something," says Kankis. "but we will get the job done. We're the top special for ces outfit in the world." Hope so. Gordon. You only get so many second chances. UFeiNj \\e\y !!'.J^T, MCAT. DAT, NCLEX, NMB, CPA, BAR REVIEW & OTHERS Prepare with The Best KAPLAN SUN IE Y H.K API AN EDUCATIONAL CENTER LTD. CENTER CITY'UNIVERSITY OF PENNSYLVANIA WILLOW GROVE-MAIN UNE'CHERRY HILL StreetMusic: Ifs captivatirv 4/ 34th Street October 22, 1987

19 The Series fans forgot By Jon Wilner Turn your clocks back. Al this lime last year, the New York Mets and the Boston Red Sox were engaged in a riveting seven-game series to determine the winner of the Fall Classic. Surely, it was one of the most emotional series in recent memory from a fan's perspective, as over a decade's worth of frustration was released from both sides. Fans came out of the woodwork in droves. This onslaught of sycophants might have been expected due to the heavy New York and New Kngland-based population displaced along the East Coast. But back to the present. This week, the Minnesota Twins are playing the St. Louis Cardinals. And unless you happen to have a small wager on the outcome, are a native of either state or are a relative or close friend of the participants, you have no reason to care about the outcome. I mean really care. Most baseball fans are interested because they are fans of the game, not of the teams involved. It's a shame, because fans need to have something or someone on whom they can release their emotions. This year, that situation is especially true, as the football strike has created a rift between the fans and the millionaire ballplayers American sports need a boost, and the World Series could have been the cureall. Why doesn't anybody care? First and foremost, it's because of the teams involved. Neither has an especially large national backing, as a team from a major city would. In the Midwest, this is undoubtedly a hotly contested series, but does a typical sports fans identify with either team? No. And this is the greatest problem. Before the series began, how many players on either team could you have named? Two? Three? Certainly no more than five. Most of all, fans identify with the stars the Reggie (acksons. Dwight Coodens and Roger Clemens of the world. Where are they in this series? A.W.O.L. In fact, the biggest stars of each team are not even playing for the Twins, it's their stadium, the Homer er. Metrodome; for the Cardinals, it's their injured slugger. )ack Clark. The Hubert II. Humphery Metrodome gives the Twins an immense home field advantage. It is a haven for longballs. lost pop flics, pinball-type bounces and deafening crowd noise. The Metrodome's impact is accentuated by Minnesota's having the best home record in the majors this season. On the St. I.ouis side. Clark is out with torn ligaments in his ankle. He's not even on the Cardinals' roster. That means 35 home runs and truckloads of intimidation are out of the lineup. With Cla/k playing, St. Louis is a heavy favorite: without him, they have big problems scoring runs against a solid two-man pitching staff like Minnesota's. And the networks, namely ABC. are not thrilled with the match-up. They want ratings, and they are not going to get them from Minnesota and St. Louis In addition, the major media markets play a large role in hyping the Series. Where are these markets? In the Northeast. L.A. and Chicago. Despite being two exciting and likeable teams, the Twins and Cardinals do not evoke the passion of Series past. This is unfortunate, because this World Series could have provided professional sports with a much-needed kick in the butt. STREET EM Act I Framing A '15 Poster POSTER FRAMES! Shouldn't Cost W" su«. Act i To Frame! 24 x 30 *JM»»39.OO SAME DAY SERVICE 24 " 36 * ***«$43-65 ON ALL POSTERS "*' * " «*v». *«"«* 270 S. 20th St. 2nd Fl. Tues.-Sat Sl (ov»t SMIOOO Unlimited) STUDENT DISCOUNTS FOR EUROPE LOWEST filrffires TO THE ORIENT 3730 WfiLMUT ST /fltf*^"^ W4. Indigo A Gallery of Art & Artifacts from Asia, Africa & the Americas Featuring textiles, pottery, baskets sculpture, masks and (ewelry Tuesday through Saturday 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. 107S.22ndSt.,Phila, PA I ANN DUOUESNAY. STEPHEN SIAHl TUESDAY THRU FRIDAY 8PM SATURDAY A SUNDAY 3PM&8PM TICKETS LIMITED ENGAGE MENT! PRODUCED BY SPIVAK MAGID BOX OFFICE TICKETRON LEADING TICKS! AGENCIES GROUP DISCOUNTS INfO* CHARGE BY PHONE <?l S > 9?? 1011 ll I Ml I M IMM \ \ 3J4 SOUTH STREET PHIIADEIPHIA PA N BYE DANCE CENTER Coupon good for one tree introductory class' 34th Street October / 5

20 STREETEE] t ^^ i#-»" ^k 7~ j -«MiL ^ff j #^ a^i *J W^ M k> * - V a,«~'v. t av 1 L. r i.-h - Shaggy defense attorney Cher tampers with a willing Dennis Quaid Legal tender By Jim Gladstone ovies shouldn't make us feel stupid they should rupei I us. Mystery films promise sus pense. excitement and, most importantly, the chance to play with a puzzle When it conies time for the puzzle's solution, viewers have every right to understand the logic by which it was solved. But at the end of the intricately plotted Suspect, the viewer gets cheated. The characters have been emotionally involving, the action engrossing, but there's no payoff: "I don't get it. It doesn't fit together," say audience members. "Am I stupid?" By Sarah Dunn A ballerina waits in the corner of a busy Italian airport. As the camera slides upward from her hightop sneakers to her elongated Levi-clad legs, her profession announces itself through her bizarre, misshapen pose natural only to mutants and dancers. Similarly. Mikhail Baryshnikov's new vehicle. Dancers. is just what it appears to be: a movie about dancers, ballet dancers, to be precise. And on this premise the film delivers. The dancing, which, unlike Baryshnikov's White Nights. focuses almost solely on classical ballet, is spectacular. The forced surrounding scenario, however, sinks the film. Based on Giselle, a tragic love story in which a man is torn between a powerful heiress and a lovely peasant girl. Dancers showcases Baryshnikov as an aging dancer making a film of his final performance "because film is forever." While in pursuit of immortality, he dis- The ability to enjoy this film is closely tied to a person's threshold for intellectual masochism. If you're going to insist on things making sense, you're going to drive yourself nuts. If you can absorb the good and ignore the bad. you can have an enjoyable time. Strangely for a mystery. Suspect is an actor's film. Director Peter Yates had similar plot problems with his last mystery flick. Eyewitness, but the performances by William Hurt and Sigourney Weaver almost rescued him. This time. Yates recruits Dennis Quaid and Cher. They're even better. Cher plays Kathleen Riley, an overworked Washington, DC, public defender representing a deaf-mute indigent on murder charges somehow connected to The lead shoes 6 / 34th Street October 22, 1987 covers a desire for a modern day Giselle. Enter Lisa (Julie Kent), the American ballerina with the high-tops who dances in the corps. After locking eyeballs half a dozen times, Baryshnikov confronts her and says, "would you twy peas to sink of me as just a guy." Lisa blushingly obliges. DANCERS Directed by Herbert Ross At the Sameric 4 Scrasnotay by Sarah Ksmochan. Produced by Manaham Golan and Voram Globut Starring Mikhail Baryshnikov and JuNaKaM. About now the audience expects the following sequence of events: They consumate their love, the haughty chick dancing the part of Giselle is either fired or breaks a toe. Lisa gets her Big Chance on center stage, and Mischa. inspired by her, dances better than ever before. Seldom does an audience actually wish for such cliched plot twists, but. unfortu- nately, none of the aforementioned events takes place. Instead, the audience gets dragged through a mass of drivel in which innumerable, tiresomely obvious parallels illustrate that life imitates art. A sure-fire climax would be a grand finale in which Lisa danced Giselle. She never does, and, therefore, the outer film never gets off the ground. Kent physically resembles a ballerina emaciated and tall, with that long-hair-that belongs-in-a-bun hair. Her appearance virtually constitutes the sum total of her performance, which otherwise doesn't go beyond her irritating voice and self-deprecating blush. Where Giselle should be lily-white and innocent, Kent appears pallid and childlike. We might forgive her. if we could just see her dance. In contrast, Baryshnikov is both believable and likeable, his boyish charm kicking in during the rare moments when his acting leaves the audience wanting. In another film with an autobiographical tone, Baryshnikov seems to be the upper echelons of the national judiciary. Quaid is Eddie Sanger, a gleefully conniving lobbyist who unwillingly relinquishes two weeks of wheeling and dealing on Capitol Hill to serve as a juror in Riley's case. Unable to put aside his penchant for intrigue. Sanger turns himself into a private eye, seeking out clues to help Riley save her client. His assistance is met with mixed reaction by Riley, who faces charges of collusion and jury-tampering if found out. Quaid is a revelation. It's hard to believe this is the same guy who played a standard-issue hunk in last summer's so-called comedy, Innerspace. Tossing off devilish grins and knowing winks, he's a young )ack Nicholson without the self-consciousness that's hampered Nicholson's credibility in recent roles. Quaid plays Sanger as a dubious version of the American dream. He's successful, boyish and charming a real Mr. Smith Goes to Washington but he'll sleep with an older congresswoman to get a bill passed. He lobbies for the milk industry but drinks "Stolichnaya straight, no ice. three olives." ErtC Roth's screenplay gives Sanger no real motivation for his sleuthing, but the viewer goes along with it simply because Quaid seems to be having such a great time. Oddly, considering she plays a courtroom lawyer, Cher sheds the toughcookie image she's cultivated in past roles. She's convincingly vulnerable and beleaguered here without giving up the aura of determination and intelligence which always makes her work such a pleasure. Suspect's costume designer, however, still treats Cher like a novelty item. What civil servant would discuss business with her superior wearing spandex leggings and a funky off-the-shoulder sweater? What lawyer pleading on behalf of a social outcast would show up in court in a leather suit? Cher sinks into her characters admirably: she shouldn't have to do combat with a wardrobe that brings her former personas to the surface. In addition to its star attractions, Suspect has a fine supporting cast. Broadway actor )oe Mantegna, as the prosecuting attorney and. particularly, John Mahoney as an increasingly threatening judge make for the best courtroom scenes since Jagged Edge. Yates paces his film briskly, but still finds time to offer some social commentary and let characters develop. And at last, a film set in the capitol takes note of the city's dichotomy of elite riches and urban squalor. Washington is a full-scalp setting in Suspect, not merely a colle( lion of marble monuments and endless corridors. Yates' thematic suggestion that nobody is completely innocent effectively ties the film together. His work here is much subtler than in his last outing, the Oscar-nominated The Dresser. Nonetheless, the director is ultimately to blame for his film's extremely unsatisfying conclusion, which undercuts everything good about Suspect. Despite the terrific testimony, the audience ends up treated unjustly. ' That was lovely, now will you please get off my foot? making a successful career out of portraying himself with minor alterations. The final quarter of the film is devoted to the performance of Giselle. By eliminating selfconscious camera angles and hype-building editing, director Herbert Ross allows the dancing to speak for itself. In doing so. however, he takes Dancers abruptly from a predictably slick production to the visual equivalent of a PBS special. The film closes with a mov- ing scene in which Baryshnikov asks Lisa to explain her curious absence during the filming of the second act. She answers by pushing down the waistband of her pants and showing him a tiny daisy tattooed on her hip. This bit of whimsy seems logical enough. After all it's only a movie.

21 STREET urn Prom knife By John Page osl people expect to get laid on prom night, but not six feet underground. Hello Mary LOU, Prom Night Two. an exercise in possession, truly defines the horror genre: horrible plot, horrible acting, horrible directing. At Hamilton High's 1957 prom night, sultry queen candidate Mary Lou Maloiu-v dumps sappy Billy Nordhain for the suave and debonair Budd] Cooper. Smelling a rat, Billy decides to exact his revenge on Mary Lou by throwing a stink bomb on her during the onstage crowning (a la Carrie). HELLO MARY LOU: PROM NIGHT II Directed by Bruce Pittman At Eric's Place Screenplay by Ron Oliver. Produced by Peter Simpson Starring Michael Irontldee end Wendy Lyon. Alas, this plan blows up in his nerdy face as Mary Lou catches fire and burns to death, barely catching a glimpse of her murderer. Thirty years later, Vicki Carpenter, an overprotected Catholic girl, attends Hamilton High and dates Craig Nordham. the principal's son. Somewhat ironically, Buddy Cooper became a Catholic priest, while fireball Billy currently serves as Hamilton High's principal. Mary Lou's quite crisp and quite dead spirit gradually possesses Vicki's innocent body. Almost immediately, she starts wreaking havoc. The story drifts along until the last 15 minutes, when suddenly the audience is barraged with enough plot twists to make even Linda Blair's head spin. )im Doyle's spectacular special effects provide some of Prom Night Two's few bright spots. Paper cutters, chalkboards and lockers are among the everyday high school equipment which takes on a morbid twist. The dryly amusing script lightens this splatter flick. Father Cooper constant!) hears the G-damn word said in his presence, albeit unintentionally. Craig. telephoning Vicki on prom night, reaches her answering machine and hears it spit out. "I've got places to go and people to kill." Overemphatic. simplistic camerawork makes the foreshadowed massacre just a hit too obvious. Watching a close-up of Vicki slowly pouring 15 scoops of sugar into her coffee after reflecting earlier "Sugar.. that stuff will kill you." is a not so subtle means of saying, well, she might just be possessed. As Billy, Michael Ironsides of Scanners fame stoicly performs his lines while upholding a shining example for today's impressionable youth after all, he only knocks his own son unconscious and murders a young girl. Lisa Schrege gives a fiery performance as the expired yet revengeful prom queen, but Wendy Lyon, as her modern after-ego. loses all credibility in one randomly inserted locker room scene with lesbian overtones. The most skillfully composed prose related to the film is its rhyming title. The rhyme or reason for the rest of this inane yet stylish show of Jim Doyle's skillful hand remains to be seen. A limousine with personalized plates "Mary Lu 2" pulls away in the movie's last scene. With any luck, a similar car with "Mary Lu 3" plates will catch ablaze before it ever rolls off Detroit's assembly line. Vicki opens up, but Mary Lou steps out at the prom Sonny experiences the danger of love on the run with the sexy Mrs. Howard Glatt Puppy love Teen loses himself in praise of older women By Michael Geszel In if a 15-year-old boy eloped with an woman six years his senior, and then, once that marriage was annulled, repeated the escapade with a woman 20 years older, what would be the reaction? Would certain folk call for justice against the peckerwielding hoodlum, while others suggest he be bronzed as a champion of crossgenerational love? Whatever the reaction, it would not be as harsh and derisive as the one that greeted Ellsworth "Sonny" Wisecarver back in For Sonny, the Boy who Loved Women, it was all so simple love is ageless, or timeless, or something. In In The Mood. Sonny (Patrick Dempsey) faces stern retribution from every mode of authority. His rigid society denies that love is a field where any post-pubescent squirt can roam as if love bore the stamp "XXX, not admitted under 21." Remember, though, this is And in the boy with the heart of a nightingale, spewing optimism from every note, innocently sets out to live. Sonny skips school, meanders around with older friends and meets 21-year-old Judy (Talia Balsam) at a party. Their attraction cannot be explained by sexual chemistry, nor is Sonny all that sharp. But he exudes sweetness and, most of all. treats women with respect and care. When hj asks )udy her opinion on the date of D-day, she replies by denegrating herself: "It doesn't matter I'm a girl" "No." says Sonny, "girls have opinions." Coming from a male. pre-steinem, this is both endearing and odd. Sonny walks around in search of nothing special, but love just happens to bounce into his life. This whimsical playfulness lends the film a light, fluffy feel. At first the sudsy amorous goings-on illicit an irritated laugh too much breathless innocence. But once the viewer accepts the film for what it is. a charming caricature of the consequences of "illegal love." the breezy warmth of In the Mood takes over. IN THE MOOD Directed by Phil Alden Robinson At the Eric Rrttenhouse Screenplay by Phil AMen Robinson Produced by Gary Adeison and Karen Mack Starring Patrick Dempsey and Beverly 0Angeto. Integral to this effect is Dempsey's performance as the droopy-eyed sweetheart: his sincerity and joviality is contagious. Initially. Dempsey and the film are endangered by an excess of solemnity and itchy good-feeling, but their ingenuousness eventually leads to snug contentment. Dempsey's unthreatening stature and candor make him the perfect champion for free will and polite but obstinate reasoning. When confronted with a crusty, peevish judge, Sonny asks him inoffensively: "Why are grown-ups punishing me?" The answer is simply: "Because you pissed us off. By painting society with such exaggerated strokes, however, director Phil Alden Robinson has taken the bite out of a retrospective argument just what the hell were they think ing back in 1944 when they threw this poor Lothario in jail? Robinson evades this question by turning all the characters into stereotypes. Mom's a ditsy old hag with poodlecheeks that seem as if they are melting off her face. link's live-in beau is a mammoth man and a caricature of every churlish beer-guzzling hooligan. Even Sonny's paramours border on the predictable. Robinson's pushy directorial style compounds the stereotypes, overloading the viewer with exaggerated facial expressions and reactions. By trying too hard to be amusing, Robinson makes a film that is the equivalent of a clown's contorted face, pulling a desperate but fleeting chuckle from a captive audience. As /n the Mood advances, each laugh becomes emptier than the last, and finally the film turns into cinematic junkfood. One genuinely pleasing element of the film is Beverly D'Angelo's knowing, acute portrayal of Irani me the sassy tart who constitutes Sonny's second foray with the second sex. In contrast to Judy's tenderness, Francine exposes Sonny to a raunchier kind of woman. D'Angelo's swaggering performance adeptly and entertainingly captures her character's lewd overtones. While the deceiving and poorly chosen title conjures up images of a more moistly sexy film, it does suggest the dumpy awkwardness of Sonny's initial love session. A more apropriate title would have encapsuled In The Mood's comic sensibilities, just as a more mature approach to the material could have netted a more lingering fondness. 34th Street October 22, 1987/7

22 8 / 34th Street October Philadelphia's three stooges do the auto parts shuffle, and consumers just can't seem to get enough.

23 111 one way or another, you've heard of them. There's Manny the balding, thinly inustached. four-eyed, pug-nosed Cuban cigar smoker, who looks like he'd sell you half of Brooklyn, the bridge included, before you can blurt out fast-talking mashugana and chow down a hot, mustard-covered corned beef sandwich on Jewish-style rye. There's Moe the dark, high foreheaded. Howdy I)oody-eared. squinty-eyed, ever-smiling group leader, whose slicked-back hair suggests that he's dealt and won many a game of black jack and straight poker in stale, smoke-filled rooms. And there's ack the walk-softly-and-carry-a-big stick, stunningly suave, icy blue-eyed, rock-jawed, smirking good-looker, whose well-defined mug and finely-combed hair would make it hard for the most proper of young ladies to just say no. Individually, the three don't pose much of a threat. Together, however, Manny, Moe and jack are about the best friends your car ever had. Together, they are the Pep Boys. The trio became immortalized in 1921 when F.manuel "Manny" Rosenfeld, Maurice "Moe" Strauss, and W. Graham " ack" Jackson (who was later replaced by Moe's brother Izzy) decided to start up a Philadelphia-based auto-parts business called The Pep Auto Supply Company. But the name, which was informally handed down from a product of those rookie years Pep Valve Grinder Compound was not to be followed by the promotional likenesses for quite some time. It was a long 45 years later that local Philadelphia artist Harry Moscovitz drew the now legendary first character sketches of what have come to be something of cult figures across America. Though Moscovitz and the boys didn't expect it. from the debut of Manny. Moe and )ack in company ads and store signs in Philadelphia, to their uncanny appearance on unlicensed T-shirts in California, the caricatures have become trademarks of infinite value. According to Anne Thompson, national director of marketing for the company, the Pep Boys have endured the years and continuously drawn a favorable response from customers. Like the best of high school sport traditions, they have become fullfledged company mascots and. on a broader scale, something of national landmarks. "Manny, Moe and lack are definitely corporate mascots." says Thompson. "I think they're popular for many of the same reasons The Three Stooges were popular they're funny and real weirdlooking. People can relate to them. They're recognized all over the country, kind of like folk heroes." The company believes in the boys' appeal so much that they equip each and every Pep Boys outlet with four-foot statues of the stooge-like patrons of the auto-supply business. Designed by Robert Gregory, a member of Pep Boys' store design staff, the papier-mache incarnations of Manny, Moe and jack have been gracing the inside and outside of stores around the country in order to attract business. Manny's cigar, Moe's big smile and lack's impeccable face haven't changed much over the years. This timelessness. Gregory maintains, is the Pep Boys' best asset. "You don't tamper with success." he says. "These are caricatures of real people and I make them just like they used to. There's no need for change. People have grown to love the Boys they're proven." Like the Michelin Man. Pillsbury Dough Boy and Charmin's Mr. Whipple. the Pep Boys have carved themselves a place in the hearts of consumers. So much so. that they've become an identity unto themselves, never mind the company. lames Meyer, a stock analyst for Philadelphia's anney Montgomery Scott Inc.. says that the value the Pep Boys hold for Pep Boys the company is large but not easily defined. "The correlation between Manny. Moe and ack and the actual auto-supply business is virtually immeasurable." says Meyer. "The Pep Boys' value is not only recognizable in trading areas but all over the country. For this reason, you can't possibly figure out how much they profit from all the Pep Boys hype. "What we do know is that Manny, Moe and Jack have as much value to the Pep Boys Auto Supply Company as Ronald McDonald has to McDonald's." he adds. It's been said that Ronald McDonald is the second most recognizable character next to Mickey Mouse that means something. I'm not saying Manny. Moe and lack are three, four and five, but no one else in their business has anything like 'em. That puts the company in front of the game." Thompson agrees that the familiar image of the Pep Boys is invaluable, particularly in the toothand-nail competitive world of the auto-parts trade. "The statues and cartoons of Manny. Moe and lack give us a marketable and likeable image, and in the business we're in. it's important to have something no one else does. There are a lot of autosupply companies, but we've set ourselves apart. It's made a difference, business-wise." From a handful of shops in the Philadelphiaarea some 40 years ago, Pep Boys has increased to 201 stores on the southern, western and eastern coasts. After starting with bases in Los Angeles and Philadelphia, the company has spread to locations all over California. Arizona. Texas. New Mexico. Georgia. Nevada. Maryland, Delaware, New Jersey and Pennsylvania. And it doesn't stop there, either. Pep Boys paraphernalia and references have been spreading across "I think they're popular for many off the same reasons The Three Stooges were popular they're funny and real weird looking. People can relate to them. They're recognized all over the country, kind of like folk heroes." the country at an even quicker pace areas that have never had the opportunity to bring their cars to a Pep Boys outlet still speak of Manny. Moe and lack as if they were first cousins. "Matchbooks are all over the country with Manny. Moe and lacks' faces on them," says Thompson. "People call us up from Minnesota and Seattle, where there are no Pep Boys stores, and tell us that they love 'em. I think some kind of nostalgia is involved, the Pep boys are a tie to the past. Like I said, they're folk heroes." Ellen Weis. director of The Museum of Modern Mythology in San Francisco, credits much of the Pep Boys' success around the country to a different reason. She says that Manny, Moe and Jack are real people who grew up with and became an integral part of 20th century American comedy and culture. "What's interesting about the Pep Boys is that they are an early example of an ad taken from real people, in this case, the owners of Pep Boys." Weis says. "This type of ad character has become more and more popular in the 20th century. You can compare Manny, Moe and )ack not only to Moe, Larry and Curly but also to Kentucky Fried Chicken's Colonel Saunders. Frank Perdue and pop corn aficionado Orville Redenbacher. People find humor in these types of characters. They come to stand for something moreso than an IBM or Bell Atlantic logo. "The Pep Boys were pioneers in this type of ad characterization they've grown up with and become ingrained in much of American culture." she adds. "You don't hear someone say Yea. it's two blocks from the IBM sign.' you do hear It's two blocks past the Pep Boys sign.' In one way or another the Pep Boys are a symbol of who and what we are." Regardless of whether Manny. Moe and Jack have, from the streets of South Phi I lv to the beaches of Southern California, conquered the American market. Meyer says that, without quality service on the business end, the Boys wouldn't be nearly as popular. "The Pep Boys' image gets people in the door." Meyer says. "After that it's up to the company to provide good service. Manny. Moe and lack can't fix any transmissions. Their longevity, in part, stems from the fact that the business they founded is a quality one." (lood business or not. the phenomenon has run rampant and, to some extent, out of the company's control. Everything from unlicensed Pep Girls Fanny, Flo and Jackie T-shirts to fan clubs to frequent mention in ohnny ('arson monologues have hit the mainstream. And according to Thompson, only more is to come. "At this point." says Thompson, "we've talked about coming out with Manny. Moe and lack dolls and cards, among other things. We do have a Pep Boys T-shirt that we sell. It was even featured in How lo California as a must for all wanna-be Californians." But Mitchell G. Leibovitz. executive vice president of Pep Boys, says that, while all the attention the Boys bring is desirable, the company will not go so far as to license the Pep Boys' name to every gimmick this side of Peoria. "We know we've got a good thing." says Leibovitz. "but for now. we don't want to spend so much time on promoting Manny. Moe and Jack as to neglect the main business." In many instances, though. Meyer suggests that it is the indeed business that is being neglected by the existence of the wide array of Pep Boys memorabilia. "People who are using the Pnp Boys logo or name without a license are doing it illegally." he says. "Yes. the company's name gels even more widespread but if you've created the value you should profit from it not some guy selling matchbooks in Minnesota. "Also a company has to enforce its trademark otherwise, it might lose it. like Aspirin and Bayer. That's why Xerox keeps telling everybody you don't make a Xerox copy, and if you do. it better be on a machine with a capital X." he explains. "It's hard to find out who makes the stuff, but a company like Pep Boys would certainly like to control it not so much for the royalties but to stop merchandise they wouldn't be proud of." Benjamin Strauss. Moe's son and chairman of the company, says that the last thing he'd like to do is lose control over the trademark. But with Pop Boys. Poop Boys and Peep Boys T-shirts springing up across the country it's been an uphill battle. "Things like Pep Girls T-shirts are unlicensed." says Strauss. "There are a lot of other unlicensed takeoffs the Prep Boys. mugs, stickers. So now we have a trademarker running around trying to stop people from making money off our name. The free advertising is good for business but we should be getting a piece of the action." Despite the seemingly everlasting popularity of the trademark trio, a few years back, there was almost no more Pep Boys action to be found. According to Thompson, a Philadelphia-based advertising agency suggested that Strauss and company rid themselves of the Manny. Moe and Jack mascots. "They said the Boys were dated." says Thompson. "Needless to say, their idea didn't go over too well, and they didn't get our business." With that settled. Manny. Moe and Jacks' notoriety has grown by the month. Their power is so great, says Thompson, that they are often the first step to attracting new business, sort of like the company's resident ice-breakers. "The Boys are used in all our grand openings because they are such a big attraction. In a recent opening in Atlanta, we had huge billboards of them up all over town and we had these new Walt Disney-like Manny. Moe and lacks' walking around and making friends. People became familiar with them in about a week." So. despite all the hoo-ing and hah-ing about keeping business and the Boys separate, the kernel of truth is plainly this Manny. Moe and Jack mean recognition, recognition means customers, and customers mean dollar signs. And for all practical purposes, says Strauss, that's the key to the auto-supply business. "We've got a beautiful relationship working." he says. "Both the Boys and business are good. Manny. Moe and Jack would be happy." 34th Street October /9

24 10 / 34th Street October

25 After sir,ill Ink creeping onto New York newsstands a little over a year ago..spy magazine is gaining increased notoriety. Varying in tone from playful, to irreverent, to downright nasty,.spy is usually right on the mark, whatever its approach or subject. And unlike most entries into the ever-growing media market, this magazine is truly filling a void. Where else could you find a consumer guide to prison, a map to President Reagan's body and a story proving once and for all that you can indeed be too rich and too thin all in the same issue? If.Spy has something nice to say about a person, it doesn't waste any space announcing it; according to co-editors Kurt Andersen and B. Graydon (barter, that niche is already overcrowded, thank you. They prefer to use their pages to cut through the celebrity mystique, rather than to glorify it..spy celebrates the humor in the everyday, whether detailing restaurant code violations (complete with symbols for tiny flies, dead mice and inspection certificates), comparing subway ( uisine ( "What's with those rolling hot dog servers anyway? Are those pups being cooked or exercised?") or offering a handy Post-O- Matic chart to predict the headlines of tomorrow's afternoon tabloid. And while the magazine may garner the most attention for its celebrity-bashing profiles (Oprah Winfrey, Jake Steinfeld and Kd Schlossberg were particularly pitiful victims), a good deal of its charm lies in its more playful pieces. A popular recurring feature called "Separated at Birth?" juxtaposes photos of, say. Eve Arden and Vincent Price. George Schullz and The Cowardly Lion, and Sam Donaldson and Mr. Spock. Initially intended for an almost entirely New- York readership. Spy is now on sale in 25 or HO cities across the country, as well as in Canada and London. Approximately 20 to 25 percent of its circulation is based outside of New Y'ork. and Andersen estimates that over the next few years, that figure could reach 50 percent. In the meantime, much of the magazine's humor remains very inside-manhattan, and Andersen says that the magazine doesn't have any definite plans to broaden its focus to satisfy more out-of-town readers. Still, the pointed barbs are getting across. "I guess it's always been a funny sort of magazine for smart urbanites rather than New Yorkers, whatever that implies." Andersen says. "From the beginning we imagined that our readers tended to be people more or less like ourselves people who graduated from college, who lived in a big city, who liked Saturday Night Live, and I think that's right. "I knew most of the people reading Time magazine were not like me. and that's true of writing for most magazines. Just because the audience is so huge, usually, you have a broader group of people." he adds. "The writers get a lot more attention for pieces in Spy than they do when they write for magazines with five or 10 times the circulation, because people they know see it." And these people aren't hurting business, either. According to publisher Thomas Phillips Jr.. a recent subscriber survey revealed that the readership has a median age of :t.1 and a median income of $63,000. "We've reached a market that we hadn't really planned on. one that is very hard for marketers to get to." he says. "It's a young and upscale market and don't say that word." "They're smart and well-educated they read." he adds. "People don't pick up.spy just to look at it." But that's not to say that the magazine isn't a sight for bored eyes..spy's design while sometimes chaotic and hard to follow reflects the more playful side of the magazine. They've featured a tear-out taxi-hailing sign, a Pat Buckley Halloween mask and "!.egal All Stars" trading cards. Evan mom of a treat is the reliance on charts and complex mathematical formulas to underscore the text. A story on runts Stacked Ihem on their fortunes to give them an adjusted height, and "Colleges of the Dumb Rich" utilized a number of statistics including average SAT scores, total costs, the number of volumes in the library and acceptance rate to determine each school's Dumb Rich Quotient. "That's partly the sort of Time. Inc. experience plopped on its side and turned upside down." says Andersen. "It goes to the heart of something we're trying to do: which is combining nonfictioii and factual reportage with a common sensibility. And by being so excessivley serious, that's funny in its own way. "One thing that makes Spy different from humor magazines, which we never really think of ourself as. is the nonfictional nature of what we do. The use of formualas and ohartsj just reinforces that and it's fun to do. And it helps distinguish us from sort of arbitrary musings. It gives us a pseudo-scientific quality." "We wanted just to creep onto the newsstands and for people to discover us the way they discover small movies. Vanity Fair opened like Rambo or like Ishtar we wanted to open like A Room With A View." N allied after the publication immv Stewart worked for in The Philadelphia Story. Spy was conceived three years ago during lunchtime chats between Larter and Andersen, who were both employed by Time. Inc. "It began with just the idea that it would be great!o have a funny, literate magazine that would be our favorite magazine." says Andersen. They calltxi on Phillips then a venture capitalist to come up with the necessary investors. And with a lean budget and a crew consisting of mostly friends anil secondhand acquaintances, they set out to conquer Manhattan. Rather than embark on an elaborate publicity campaign..spy's management relied on newsstand sales, a direct-mail campaign, word of mouth and a few scattered mentions in the press to get their product noticed. "We learned a big lesson from Vanity hair." says (arter. Vanity Pair spent about $10 million just telling you what this thing was going to be and how great it was. When Vanity Pair came out it was a huge collapse, and that terrified us. "We wanted just to creep onto the newsstands and for people to discover us the way they discover small movies." he adds. "Vanity- Pair opened like Rambo. or like Ishtar we wanted to open like A Room With A View." The good word has been spreading, but perhaps not as quickly as it would appear. Having writers friends reading the magazine often means that those same writers' friends will also be writing the magazine, and maybe even hav- ing their letters appear in print. Ben Wunderli of Walertown. Mass.. was introduced to the magazine by a friend on the staff. After thai friend's boyfriend wrote an article for.spy, Wunderli also managed to land In the pages of the magazine. Mis contribution was a letter to the Editor praising the piece that his friend's boyfriend had written. And.Spy hasn't tickled everyone's funny bone. Esquire admonished the magazine for being just one repeated joke, and a large number of the people reached through the initial direct-mail campaign decided not to continue reading beyond their free trial subscriptions. One such less-than-enamored reader. New York's Peter Basch (who savs he doesn't know anyone on the staff), wrote in to express his contempt. And although Basch hasn't picked up the magazine since, he can still recall what turned him off. "I thought a lot of it was insufferable and obnoxious. The snotty attitude really bothered me." he says. "They seem like a bratty, rich 'in' group they want you to feel like a part of I their clique. At least Details and Interview are openly shallow:.spy pretends to be deep." Another reader and letter-writer, Gary McBride of Columbus, Ohio, says he enjoys the magazine, although probably Mil percent of it goes over his head. But he. too, finds the tone a bit repetitive. "It's a lot of. 'Well, who can we whine about now?' " he complains. Andersen is quick to respond to the one-joke criticism; it's clear that he's heard it all before, and probably mom often than he would care to admit. "Whatever it is. as long as it's real and true and funny, we'll like it: it doesn't have to be critical or negative or adversarial." he says. "On the other hand, a lot of what we do and a lot of what satire is will be that. It's just like if you go to a szechuan restaurant and then complain that it doesn't serve hamburgers. "We are successful because we do have this defined point of view and mandate, whereas we're not trying to be a magazine that does everything like Psquire. They speak to a million people." he says. "We don't want it to wear thin either, but the bottom line is that a satirical magazine is a satirical magazine and you don't want to blunt that," While.Spy tends to focus its attacks on the rich and infamous Donald Trump is a particular favorite the magazine does throw in a few surprises. One cover story tore apart short men. subtitling it "Mow the Runts Have Taken Over and Why We Are Powerless to Stop Them." The magazine's fondness for the mathematical aside. Andersen says that there is no particular formula they enlist to choose the sublets of their scorn. "In general, it's people who are publicity hounds in some way already, so that it's not like we searched them out and found private citizens to humiliate and vilify," he says. "They're people who seem to us to be in some way dishonest or excessive, and sort of tooting their own horn gives Ihem extra points." Since it only takes the careful reading of an issue or two to determine the type of person who will end up on the magazine's hit list, one lingering question remains: Who do they like? "5py has to be regarded within this universe of People and Esquire and Vanity Pair that are just this puff machine that's saying how great everyone is," Andersen says. "That job is done, so basically of public figures getting attention, if we aren't sort of making fun of them, I guess it can be assumed that we think they're okay. "I think we choose our targets carefully enough that and have enough room to get at people sooner or later if they merit some kind of scrutiny that the people who escape do so for a reason " Staff Photograph by Fr 34th Street October 22, 1987 / 11

26 STREET EMH Let's make lots of money, honey Pet Shop Boys Tennant and Lowe go dancing with themselves By Jim Gladstone y radio played songs like 'Tainted Love' " sings Neil _l Tennant. sinister mastermind of Pet Shop Boys, in recounting the start of a musical lifestyle marked by chilled romance, soullessness and alienation. With the emergence of British bands like Soft Cell and Human League in the late '70s. a cold-blooded and virulent strain of pop began coursing its way through the record industry. In nightclubs, more pervasively than on radio, a sort of sleeping sickness has resulted hypnotic, homogenous electronics have replaced human spirit in dance music. Tennant's reference to Pet Shop Boys' musical elder siblings comes in a product (there are no songs on this album) called "I Want To Wake Up." It's a purposefully ironic title, for the piece knowingly drones along in the tranceinducing tradition of its forebearers. actually is an extremely painful album to listen through, an endless sequence of synthesizer effects and deadpan Eurodisco vocals that have been heard thousands of times before. It's also shrewdly self-referential and subversive; Pet Shop Boys know exactly what they're doing. Tennant was a pop reviewer before deciding to manufacture a bit of stardom for himself. Forgive them a lousy record album and credit them a bitterly critical piece of art. Start with the album cover, designed by the Boys themselves. It's almost the same as the cover of their first record. please. A field of white is broken by the title, written in a standard, generic typeface. There's also a small, flat-looking photograph of Tennant and his cohort, Chris Lowe. Both fellows wear formal dinner jackets and their faces are covered in pallid white makeup: the photo tells us to expect music that is stiff and anemic. On the please cover, both Boys stared blankly at record buyers. On actually Tennant openly yawns. This sort of blunt, straightforward record labeling is the stuff of Tipper Gore's dreams. Consumers have been warned: Expect the same old stuff, with a little extra ennui thrown in to deaden things up. The music is mass production par excellence. Fairlight synthesizers and electronic keyboards are used to create percussion, horn and string sounds, as well as the Boys' trademark car crash and street-noise snippets. No other instruments are played. Tennant accompanies strident melodies with his coolly disaffected vocals in odes to isolation, sex as commerce and the banality of the very numbers he's singing. The lyrical cynicism describes specific romances, but also provides vivid pictures of cruelly calculating pop stars' relationships with their fans. "I love you. you pay my rent" is the refrain of "Rent." which ends in a repeated chant of "It's so easy, it's so easy, it's so easy." On "Heart." Tennant's emotional grunts are immediately followed by synthesized versions of the same sounds, which are then repeated ad infinitum. draining away all passion. Staccato Lord, have mercy The Chain discards fuzz; Dumptmck celebrates uncertainty DUMPTRUCK For the Country Big Tim* OnLP, r Dumptmck is part of a tightly knit community of underground guitar bands that stretches from Athens, Ga.. to Boston, Mass. These likeminded bands tour together, use the same recording studios and producers and occasionally even trade personnel. Naturally, a great deal of musical similarity also exists between the bands due to their frequent networking and socializing. Formed in 1983 in New Haven. Conn.. Dumptruck relocated to Boston a year later and gradually grew from a twopiece to a tighter, more profes- 12 / 34th Street October 22, 1987 sional four-piece band. After releasing their debut LP, D Is for Dumptruck, on their own label. Dumptruck enlisted highly acclaimed guitar pop hitmaker Don Dixon (R.E.M.. Marshall Crenshaw. Marti ones) to produce the follow-up, Positively! Dumptruck. The teaming resulted in a wonderful mix of rolling singsongs and introspective studies. Their latest, For the Country. is produced by Hugh (ones (The Saints, Echo and the Bunnymen, That Petrol Emotion). And although the punchy, sharp production is English, the music is still American East Coast. For the Country takes elements from Guadalcanal Diary. Zeitgeist. R.E.M. and even Ry Cooder. and combines them into songs that are wide open, well-crafted and sometimes stark. Lyrically. however, the LP focuses more on themes of isolation, loneliness and losing friendships than its predecessor did. This shift in spirit may. in part, be due to the departure of Kirk Swan, one half of the original songwriting team. The other half. Seth Tiven. now fronts the group and writes most of the material. The songs and the performances are still on target: Tiven's guitar work is laden with wonderful country slides and unexpected grace notes. But this boy seems to have been rather depressed of late, and that's all he sings about. Still. Tiven's not too obvious about his heavy load, and in the subtly infectious rockers "Coing Nowhere." "Island" and "Carefree." Dumptruck joyously celebrates those nagging feelings of uncertainty. Andrew (Jimlkm It's quite evident that not al vocal overdubs are used here and elsewhere to create an air of clone-like insincerity to any sentiment in the lyrics. "Shopping," bound to be a hit with its despicable chorus of "S-H-O-P-P-I-N-G. we're shopping." is a song as much about the marketing of Pet Shop Boys as anything else. Tennant refers to his music-biz expertise when he notes. "It's easy when you've got all the inside information/inside help/no questions in the house." He further muses on the issue of who is really gaining possession of whom when a record is purchased: "There's a big band in the city/we're on the make/our gain is your loss/that's the price you pay." Another tune points out the derivative nature of the Boys' genre of modern dance music. Vocals are laid on top of the bass riff from Art Of Noise's 1986 dance version of "Peter Gunn." the Henry Mancini piece composed in the early '60s. The cut's telling title: "Hit Music." The lyrics: "Hit music on the radio/hit music in the disco/you live a THE JESUS AND MARY CHAIN Darklands Sire On LP, CO. Cassette The Jesus and Mary Chain's second LP signals a major change for this concept band of the '80s. Whereas previous Jesus and Mary Chain releases were characterized by relatively short tunes laced with pervasive feedback and distortion. Daiklands presents 10 longer cuts, all free of a wall of fuzz. This absense is significant, especially for those who considered feedback to be the main staple of The Jesus and Mary Chain concept/fad sound. The live performances that coincided with the release of 1985's Psychocandy helped to foster this image. By nonchalantly cranking out 20-minute concerts of noise, often with their backs to the audience, the band developed a reputation for being spoiled, I of the boys are amused lie." actually's best cut is the brilliantly conceived historical juxtaposition "What Have I Done To Deserve This?" Pet Shop Boys, exemplars of the latest British invasion, recruit Dusty Springfield, their rightful musical mother, to scold her mutant spawn for their absence of passion. Springfield pumped a lot of soul into her "60s pop hits. "I Only Want To Be With You" and "You Don't Have To Say You Love Me," to actually come across as emotionally motivated in her music. Therein lies a major difference between then and now: "You always wanted a lover," sings Tennant, "I only wanted a job." Meanwhile, Springfield laments "How am I going to get through? How am I going to get through?" She doesn't. Springfield bites the dust, obliterated in a building swirl of Boyish electronics. As new music for your collection. actually is irrelevant. But if you're a connoisseur of cultural criticism, the album will cost you less than a Duchamp. adolescent-like performers rather than musicians. With Darklands, the Chain begins to combat the aura that is growing around them. The feedback is stripped away, yet the music sounds almost the same. The glaring difference is that now the lyrics are decipherable. All the lyrics are provided, not just snatches of them as on previous releases. And it is the lyrics, not the lack of distortion, that makes Darklands. The alienation, confusion and emotion once embodied by the barricade of vacuum cleaner distortion is now aired in the predominantly unhappy and cynical lyrical compositions. In the title cut, William Reid sets the tone for the LP by singing. "I'm going to the darklands/ To talk in rhyme/with my chaotic soul." Packed with metaphors for sadness and depression. Darklands utilizes rain, storms, falling and darkness to get its poetic point across. "Sometimes in the summer sunshine/the sky falls down on

27 STREET cma me," )iin Reid sings in "Down on Me." And in "Fall," the Reid brothers sing, "Everybody's falling down on me/and I'm as dead as a Christmas tree." Somehow tied in with this sense of depression is a strong, yet odd, feeling of love. The Reid brothers constantly reverse traditional images of affection by revealing confusion over their emotions. In "April Skies." love and the spring sun take on new meanings: "Under the April sun/sun grows cold/sky gets black." And "Happy When it Rains" drives home the irony of being in love while remaining -quite miserable: "Look at me enjoying/something that feels like pain." The net effect is, ultimately, not detrimental to The Jesus and Mary Chain's music. But by conceding to their critics, the band has lost something other than feedback: it has lost some of its integrity. Chris Adamson THE FLAMING LIPS Oh My Gawd' Restless On LP, Cassette The Flaming Lips have always provided the public: with interesting record packages. Past- releases have featured such unique perks as discs pressed on red-and-white vinyl and album covers featur- ing striking photographic renderings of eye balls, skulls and goofy folks from Oklahoma. The group's latest release. Oh My Gawd!, is no exception. With a cover sporting a psychedelic collage of fire, skulls and crucified pigs, and a record pressed on clear vinyl, the band's newest platter looks pretty darn neat. But another Flaming Lips tradition has been a tendency to carve inconsistent and overblown, neo-psychedelic Muzak into their sound. The group's overextended guitar romps through midly novel, and often boring, ideas are another of its trademarks. And it is this same terminal overkill which plagues Oh My Gawd'.. With the band somehow managing to stretch a few concepts into over nine minutes of lame piano playing and mid-'70s-style guitar, "One Million, Billionth of a Millisecond on a Sunday Morning" is representative of the entire LP. The song is nothing mure than a glorified intro. "Know Your Brain," another piano-fueled rocker, is also typical. Never really gettting started, this limp song's silly lyrics and pseudo-acid rock trip make even the proletarian sincerity of Mr. Piano, Elton )ohn. a welcome listening option. Oh My Gawd! does include some respectable playing and fancy studio tricks, such as drummer Richard English's late-'60s thumps. Mike Ivins' bass plunking and Wayne Coyne's fuzz-and-crunch guitar slashing. "The Ceiling is Bending" features a swirling blob of staccatto thumping drums, bass runs, acoustic and electric guitars, and various tape loops. The rhythmic threading of the various components makes this one of the LP's few standouts. Other songs bring to mind Syd Barrett, The Who and oven Led Zeppelin. But these few interesting moments fail to rescue the majority of the album from its epic dullness. The Flaming Lips remain hindered by their inability to combine the concept of a novelty band with good, solid songwriting. Todd Margasak White dopes on funk Peppers bring hot sound to town By Gerard Babitts When The Red Hot Chili Peppers revealed their latest promo picture to EMI America, the record executives were not too pleased. Featuring each member of the funked-up crew sporting nothing more than their birthday suits and a sock (not on their feet, mind you), the photograph produced an immediate response from label higherups. THE RED HOT CHNJ PEPPERS At the ChMtnut Cabaret 38th and Chestnut Streets Thursday, 10 p.m. According to the band's lead singer and skin flutist, Anthony Kiedis, the EMI executives barked. "Do not use it for anything. Burn the negative." Never ones to listen to their corporate bosses, the Chili Peppers, who will be opening their American tour at the Chestnut Cabaret tonight, decided to sneak a copy of the picture to L.A. Weekly, which ran it that weekend. Most bands would have caught hell from a major label for such an action: however, with these four mofunkers it's just old hat. EMI-America has come to expect this sort of outlandish behavior from (he funkiest band recording today. Playing a revolutionary synthesis of funk, rock, soul and rap. The Red Hot Chili Peppers, in the words of Kiedis, try to be "musical sponges and reproduce our life experience through music and lyrics." These pranksters derive their sound from such eclectic music masters as P-Funk, Gang of Four, Run-DMC, Jimi Hendrix, Black Flag, and Sly and the Family Stone. They inject a party-hardy dose of frantic, goof-ballness to produce the most happening, vulgar grooves since the the Parliament spaceship left earth. Their first LP. True Men Don't Kill Coyotes was produced by ex-gang of Four member Andy Gill and their follow-up platter, Freaky Styley, by none other than the atomic-dog himself. George Clinton. After rubbing elbows with such godfathers of funk, it is apparent that the Chili Peppers are not mere dabbling dilettantes of the dance groove. With their latest release. The Uplift Mofo Party Plan, the Chili Peppers buckle down and inject more of a rock influence into their music. But this harder sound was not necessarily planned. "I think that we were true to the funk." Kiedis says, in telephone conversation from their manager's office in Hollywood. "We're not trying to stray from the funk. Because, you know, we owe our souls to the funk." If so, these boys are heavily in debt. Flea's plunking, popping and twanging bass, Hillel Slovak's James Brown riftfunk guitar and Kiedis' vocals ranging from baritone to tenor make "Funky Crime" and "Special Secret Song Inside" some truely sweet slabs of rhythm and blues funk. If these tunes don't get the listener up off of their thing, then not much will. The Uplift Mofo Party Plan also includes a few tunes that pound home the soul-inspired message of these funk messiahs. "Backwoods," with its repetitive grunge-hick guitar chords, driving bass and low-howling singing, is the closest thing yet written to deal with the true roots of rock and roll: "Someone spilled blood many years ago/someone spilled blood but do you know/that from the backwoods where the Chuck Berrys grow/come your long tall daddies of a rock and roll." "No Chump Love Sucker" 's fast, hardcore/rap delivery and "Fight Like a Brave" 's metal-funk/rap sound prove that these guys can rock out with the best of them. While many will draw surface sound comparisons between Beastie Boys' "Fight for Your Right to Party" and the Chili Peppers' "Fight Like a Brave." it is apparent after a few listenings that The Red Hot Chili Peppers' tune rocks harder These hot, young braves owe more than their soul to the funk and better than the Beasties'. band." And by the end (the thrash That "Brave" has real instruments is section), his love has become nothing enough in itself to give it an edge, but more than "the skin on my flute...my the addition of real-sounding dudes, dick in my hand." instead of whining snots, clearly drives Not all of the band's party-down behahome the point. vior, however, goes unchecked. The "Beastie Boys are completely different lyrics to "Love Trilogy" and "Special than us," Kiedis says. "We are a band Secret Song Inside" were omitted from who don't restrict ourselves strictly to the LP's lyric sheet. And the Chili rap. Rap is a stronghold of the band's Peppers were forced to change the title lyrics and vocal delivery. of "1 Want to Party on Your Pussy" to "The Beastie Boys get up on stage and "Special Secret Song Inside." they play a record and sing over it. It's Kiedis doesn't really seemed bothered really difficult for them to generate any by all of this internal label censorship, sort of awesome energy live," he adds. though. He sweeps the rulings of the "With us, we get up there and make EMI executives aside with the observathese organic vibrations of sound that we tion. "As long as it gets out. that's all create on the spot. So it's always new that matters." and fresh." While the Chili Peppers have received Perhaps the band's unique sound and mixed reviews for their live perforrange of influences can best be heard on mances, Keidis claims the true spirit and "Love Trilogy." The song begins with a energy of band shine through on stage. lilting reggae bassline while Kiedis "We take the party to the stage." he croons about his definition of love. For says. "It's where the maximum stimulathe first third of the song (the reggae tion of the Chili Peppers occurs." section), his love is a strong "sign of my The boys have promised to "make a affection." During the middle (the funky funky thing happen." so don't forget to section), it has become his "love for my bring along a sock for the encore. 34th Street October 22, 1987 / 13

28 STREET EJECg Take this book on the *A Train' A portrait of the artist as a music man By Michael Geszel Duke Ellington, lames Lincoln Collier's biography of the great jazz man. is not so nun li.1 life ^t< 1 v as,in evaluation of Ellington's chant tei and how 1 ii.it < banctcr influenced his work. While tliv musii undoubtedly mirrors the man. Collier sun gests tli.it the two were, lor Ellington, lynonymoua, The book lupins with,1 dis cussion ol Ellington's (Mildhood in Washington, D.C. The Mm.it middle 1 lass parents, Ellington was given almost abnormal attention l>\ Ins mothei The spci 1.1I treatment from her led Ellington to "make his 1 ousins how anil curtsy to him." Collier briefly explains thai while Ellington was manipulative and domineering, he was also loyal and generous. Krom the first pages, the hook is an opinionated account of the mixing of man and music. The author ass.its that Ellington's personality, rather than any extraordinary talent, shaped his music, lie intimates that the jazz idol might even he considered a fraud, and describes him as "a dreadful writer" and "mediocre musician. Collier feels that Ellington did not enter music out of love, but for money, fame and women. The Roaring Twenties saw a rise in the demand for musical entertainment: K11 i n g t o n formed a band. The Washtonians. and headed for New York in Here, the young musician reached the pinnacle of his inmr Hi.limit / ill ^ii swai Is this sophisticated man smiling at a Satin Doll? career while playing at The Cotton Club. He subsequently changed his band's name to The Duke Ellington Orchestra, realizing thai most popular groups of the time, such as Paul Whiteman's. and Benny Coodman's. were named after their leaders. Collier feels that Ellington was not a particularly refined musician. Rather, he had an ear for improvisation that lent itself»fcbl.all V ' «I 10 pm Frl. & S*t p.m. Sun. 1V10 p.m HAVERFORD AVE Phila.. PA (2Vj blocks In from City Line) -- City Lln«Av*. Untf.. d.ls "Just Minutes From Campus' % TB.P.IIT1 11IS 111 well to the "jungle Sound" or as Ellington liked to call it Negro Music, characterized by the growl of a trumpet. Ellington was able to tune himself into the insouciant jazz feel that gave an edge to his music. His specialty was the three minute piece: short, stylized, sassy and poignant. "Ellington was always at his best," writes Collier, "when he was evoking a specific mood. event or circumstance ralher than a long, complex idea or series of episodes. The writer says thai it was Ellington's inability to open up to people lli.it caused the difficult he experienced in writing long pieces with powerful lyrics. The narrative Is considerably slow al times. Collier's analysis ill Ellington's songs, of potential interest to jazz purists, is tedious and drawn out. He exposes the foibles and strengths in the music, just as he tries to do with the man. sometimes calling snn^s "execrable" and "dishonest " Puthermore, his detailed descriptions of how and why each hand member joined the group are superfluous and inconsistent with the mostly sketchy narrative. The book is surprisingly short on revealing anecdotes thai normally attract anil enlighten readers The biographical passages, such as they are. fall flat, while Collier's treatment of Ellington wobbles between aloofness and apology for the man's limitations: "Ellington must be forgiven for his attempts to find hit songs, which he needed to bring in the money to make the whole machine go." If Collier had as much trust in the man as he has in his own Krose technique, such rather eavy-handed conclusions would go down a lot easier. As it is. Collier's sometimes condescending style succeeds oidy in distancing the reader from the subject. He does an adequate job describing the heady atmosphere of the late '20s and early '.'ills. which percolated with talent, gangsters and hot. smoky watering holes. It is in his dlsm us sion of this period that he praises Ellington for his leadership, poise and molding of his band into one of the premier groups in jazz. DUKE ELLINGTON By James Lincoln Collier Oxford University Press $19.95 hardcover 337 pages Collier hints, though, that the i radii Ellington took for writing such classics as "Mood Indigo." "Black and Tan Fantasy" and "Sophisticated Indies" might have been mom fairly divided among several musicians. The author's most controversial conclusion is that Ellington's success and popularity can be attributed to his style, rather than innate talent. Yet even the most revealing passages are brief and far apart. The book never delivers a deep portrait of the artist. Rather, its impact is thin and withering. Collier alludes to Ellington's continuing musical influence but never wholly uncovers its roots. SHALOM... Welcome to under the PALM The PALM'S cusine takes you to a culinary fair around the Mediterranean, tasting the unique authentic dishes and appetizers, would make you feel as if you were sitting at a sidewalk cafe or restaurant in Tel-Aviv or Athens. Our selection includes a wide variety of appetizers, salads and entrees to satisfy the most discriminating taste. To our vegetarian customers - the selection is wide, fresh and exciting. Go wool on Walnut Street until H anda. Make a right on Cobbo Crook Parkway poot Markot Stroot and Ihon maho a left onto HevertonJ Avonuo. Follow Havorlord Avonuo out until approilmatery ono block boloro Crty lino Avonuo. Our rooiauranl toon tha (eft aldo ol iho otroot ao you travel wool up HevefTOfe Avenue. 15% off with Student I.D. Open Daily For Dinner Sat. & Sun. Serving Lunch and Dinner 14 / 34th Street October 22, 1987

29 Bad advice 'Tips' are not to be taken internally By Deirdre Ann Grossman What happens when three very different modern women find themselves in the same local singles bar one lonely night? They scrutinize, criticize and ultimately come together to share their stories of sex, love and modern day hang-ups. Peter Eliot Weiss's Sex Tips for Modern Girls is a comical musical revue in which three women Helen, Dot and Alyss search for the perfect man. Although they each have distinctive personalities, the three women find common bonds in sharing their stories of problematic puberties, disappointing first times and impossible relations with their mothers and men. They discuss everything from the problem of communication between the sexes, to safe sex, rape and abortion. Reliving past experiences and acting out skits about long-lived fantasies, they transform a pickup joint into a flashback movie theater. SEX TIPS FOR MODERN GIRLS At Society Hill Theater Written by Petar Eliot Watte at al. Directed by Stan Hurwltz. Starring Jim Aldan, Barbara Brignola. Suzanne Cloud, Dixie Weisman. But Sex Tips for Modern Girls fails in its presentation of these issues. The characters, meant to represent women of the '80s, are straight out of a comic book, and the crass humor and musical pieces which dominate the show make sex and female sexuality out to be a bad joke. Although a picture of three women laughing over their own insecurities and shared experiences with men could prove refreshing and entertaining, this production's view of the situation is often demeaning and offensive. While.S'ex Tips wants to be a play about women for women, both the script and the direction are blatantly masculine, as well as crass and vulgar. The play is supposedly the product of workshops in which women spoke of their feelings towards men and sex. It reulsts is a script which makes both men and women out to be perverted and emotionally warped. The three women swear in one of their songs never to be "Victims of Normality." yet they embody strictly chauvinistic stereotypes with a touch of the worst kind of vaudeville. Helen (Dixie Weisman) wears a suit, orders white wine from her private table and divorces her husband when he asks her to quit her job. Dot (Suzanne Cloud) has a weight problem, wears frumpy clothing, orders Lite beer with her cigarette and wants men to be her friends, while Alyss (Barbara Brignola) sips her strawberry daiquiri, wears a tight red dress and confesses she prefers men "who speak to her in a language she can't understand." Even The Men (Jim Alden) fluctuates between being a "penis envoy" the prey of the castrating female and the object of desire for all the others. Not once do any of the characters break away from the limits of their stereotypes, which causes their behavior to become as predictable and trite as the cliches which overwhelm this production. The experiences the characters describe match their stereotypes. When discussing their first contacts with sex. Helen describes the pain of her first adventure when she was forced to use a baggie for lack of condoms, while Alyss claims not to recall, as there have been so many. And Dot admits that her first form of real sexual excitement came as a result of "sitting on the washing MI.I- Ripe pickings By Jennifer Beach Anton Chekhov's The Cherry Orchard can be presented as a tragedy, but the author's own subtitle to the text is "A Comedy in Four Acts." Temple University's production of this classic Russian drama proves that it is indeed an effective and excellent comedy. The set is small and very intimate, with the audience seated directly on the main stage. Act One takes place in the Ranevsky nursery, where windows enclose the stage, allowing the audience to feel as though they are peering inside at the action, instead of having it presented to them. Staged as though it is being performed on a normal proscenium stage, the production ignores some of the advantages of the set's intimacy. The blocking detracts from the intimate atmosphere, and forces those seated to the sides of the stage to view the action in profile. The close proximity of the actors to the audience allows them to use subtle and expressive techniques. However, a great many of their more passionate speeches are made while gazing directly into faces in the audience, which becomes annoying after the first act. Ashley lzard gives a standout portrayal of Madame Ranevsky. the destitute aristocrat. She is the epitome of the frivolous noblewoman, planning balls and scattering money she doesn't have. Izard visibly gathers strength as her world collapses around her and she loses her home. She does a lovely job of incorporating all the nuances of this very difficult character. Izard's Ranevsky is flighty, humorous, proud, tragic and very human. Robert Parsons as Lopakhin is a disappointment. Parsons could have done much more with his role as the friend/- enemy of the Ranevsky family; instead he is lukewarm and unappealing. THC CHERRY ORCHARD At Tomttnson Theater oy AfltOfl CfMKhOV. Directed by OugaId MacArthur Starring Robert Paraona. Parsons has the responsibility of delivering the first line of the play, but instead of immediately engaging the audience in the action he leaves STREETUmiiJ Sex Tips' trio is aghast at sex book chine during the spin cycle." With few exceptions, the choreographed scenes by actress Weisman and musical pieces by John Sereda are rarely funny. Such songs as "Up to my Tits in Water," describing women's insecurities with their bodies, and "K-Y Chorale," meant to explain the truths of the female genitalia, are not even creatively sexual, just plain obscene. The set design by Michael J. Hotopp resembles many of the tacky clubs mentioned in the songs, with its modern bar and fake palm trees, yet director Stan Hurwitz's use of space leaves something to be desired. Everything takes place on a central stage, with the audience on both sides. them waiting for things to get started. Lopakhin's near-proposal to Varya (Lisa Reimer) is almost difficult to watch because of the contrast between Reimer's believable and sympathetic portrayal of a young woman on the verge of being an old maid, and Parsons' hesitant performance as her suitor. Floyd Rumohr as Peter Trofimov also gives a manydimensioned performance as "the eternal undergraduate." He is filled with burning purpose while condemning the social system of turn-of-thecentury Russia, yet retains his sensitivity to human weaknesses. The argument between Madame Ranevsky and Trofimov in the third act is one of the play's most riveting scenes. Rumohr and Izard's emotional connection during this scene is intense as both characters examine and attempt to hold onto their ideals in the midst but most of the acting and dancing is directed toward one side only. The audience's imagination is pushed to extremes in trying to relate to time and space changes and. most often, it doesn't work. If an audience exists that finds women calling each other sluts and living with sex on their minds 24 hours a day exhilarating and avant-garde, then this may be a meaningful piece of theater. The idea could have been wonderfully complex and sophisticated, and still have juxtaposed realities with humor, yet.s'ex Tips is neither interesting nor witty and definitely not good advice for modern girls or boys. of social and changes. personal Temple's production is definitely a comedy, and the humorous figures, for the most part, are portrayed with wit and style. Daniel Olmstead, as Cayev, uses a light touch in his portrayal of the longwinded Uncle. Olmstead is so subtle that he never appears clownish in his role, only amusing and sympathetic. There are not many theatrical shortcuts here, but one of them is to the playwright's advantage. In the second act, an orchard that in some productions could be a meek group of scraggly trees set about the stage is instead a shower of silvery green leaves thrown about the playing area. Temple's production succeeds as a comedy. At times it is overly sentimental, but the human qualities the humor and sadness of Chekhov's writing are apparent throughout. 34th Street October 22, 1987 / 15

30 STREET CD33 KVW Philadelphia, PA 3 WPV1 Philadelphia. PA 6 WCAU Philadelphia. PA 10 WHYY Wilmington. DE 12 WPHL Philadelphia. PA 17 WTAF Philadelphia, PA 29 WWSG Philadelphia. PA 57 WEEKDAYS October These listings include the schedule for weekday morning and afternoon programming. 500 am a Morning Stretch Perspective Delaware Valley Forum (TU.TH) Gilligan's Island 5:15 am B (FR) Gilligan's Island 5:30 m o Farm, Home and Garden O AM Philadelphia Richard Roberta > (TU.WE.TH) Cartoon 5:45 am o Before Houra (FR) Cartoon 6:00 am O NBC News at Sunrise O ABC World News This Morning o CBS Morning News B Kid's Cartoon Carnival at Cartoona 6:30 am O 3 Today Jimmy Swaggart Tom and Jerry SheRa 7:00 am B Today Good Morning America Bugs Bunny a Porky Fig B G.I. Joe B Dinoaaucera 7:15 am (B AM Weather 7:30 am S3 Morning Program Sesame Street Jem S Saber Rider 8:00 am B Woody Woodpecker 6 Jetaona S Teddy Ruxpin 8:30 am (B Today's Special B Spiral Zone S Scooby Doo B Heathclitf 9:00 am a Santa Barbara O Donahue ID Dating Game B Sesame Street B PTL Club e My Little Pony B Robert Tllten 9:30 am 03 Split Second S Gilligan's Island 10:00 am B Tim* Out B AM Philadelphia B $25,000 Pyramid B (MO.TU.TH.FR) Miller Rogers' Neighborhood B (WE) Mr Rogers' Neighborhood B 700 Club B Who's the Boss B Bonanza 10:30 am O Sally Jessy Raphael B New Card Sharks B (MO.TU.TH.FR) ITV 6 IWE Not Another Science Show B Mr. Belvedere 11:00 am O Wil Shriner B Jeopardy! CD P'ice Is Right IB (WE) ITV B (WE.TH) Making of Santo Gold B (FR) Love Your Skin B (MO) Alive Skin Care B (JU) Health and Tennis B Bewitched B Maverick 11:30 am a Ryan'a Hope B (TH) Survival Spanish 8 (FR) Reeding Rainbow B (TU) Voyage of the Mlmi B Judge B Laveme and Shirley 12:00 pm OO 03 News B(TH) French Chef B (FR) Kathy'a Kitchen B (MO) New York's Master Chefs B (TU) We're Cooking Now B (WE) Frugal Gourmet B Leave It To Beaver B Divorce Court S Dallas 12:30 pm a High Rollers B Loving B Young and the Restless B (TH) Paint with Pirtard B (FR) Nona's Palette B (MO) Magic of Oil Painting B (TU) Wonderful Wortd of Acrylics B (WE) Joy of Painting B McHale's Navy 8 Divorce Court 1:00 pm a Oaya of Our Lives O All My Children CO(TH) Mystery! B (FR) Science Unlimited B (MO) Wall Street Week B (TU) Legacy of the Hollywood Blacklist B (WE) Houdini a Hogan's Heroea B Supenor Court B Green Acrea 1:30 pm B (TU.WE.TH) Bold and the Beautiful 03 (MO.FR) Bold and Beautiful B (FR) Science Unlimited B (MO) Modem Maturity B (WE) Drive In Blues B Addams Family B (TH.FR) My Favorite Martain B (MO.TU.WE) My Favorite Martian B Meyberry R.F.D. 2:00 pm t) Another World O One Life To Live B As the World Turns B (TH) Masterpiece Theatre B (FR) Nova 8 (MO) Computer Chroniclea B (TU) Mark rjark Russell Comedy Special 8 (WE) Ed Becon B Munsters G He Man O Bionic Su 2:30 pm a (MO) Thia Old Houae (TU) Retuseniks-A Family Divided B (WE) Delaware River, Delaware Bay B Brady Bunch B Transformer* B Heathcliff 3:00 pm a Scrabble a General Hospital a Guiding Light B Contact B Ghostbusters B ThunOercats B Teddy Ruspin 3:30 pm a Super Password 8 Sesame Street 8 Popeye G (TH.FR) Ghostbusters a (MO.TU.WE) Real Ghostbusters B Smurts 4:00 pm a Wheel of Fortune a Oprah Winfrey a Magnum, P.I. a Bravestar B Dinoaaucera 4:30 pm B Newlywed Game S Mister Rogers Neighborhood B Flintstones B DuckTales a Dennis the Menace 5:00 pm a Hollywood Squares a News a Livel On City Lin* B Square On* TV a Silver Spoons 8 Happy Days B Beverly Hills Teens 5:30pm BBB News a Ditfrent Strokes B Three's Company B I Dream of Jeannie THURSDAY October 22 Complete weekday morning and afternoon liatlnga can be found on pag* 16. 6:00 pm BOB New* a MacNeil Lehrer NewsHour (1:00) a Dill rent Strokes B Family Ties a Gimme s Break! 6:30 pm a NBC Nightly News O ABC News B CBS Newt THE BEATLES Abbey Road Let It Be Just in: Billy Joel, the Radiators, Love and Rockets, Sting Depeche Mode, George Harrisson, Dream Academy J Coming soon: INXS, Stevie Wonder, Lloyd Cole Robbie Robertson DISCOVERS 11-7 everyday a Facts of Lit* B Too Close for Comfort B All In the Family 7:00 pm a People's Court a Jeopardy! B Entertainment Tonight Guest' Ann Jillian a Nightly Business Report 8 NBA Basketball B Family Ties B Simon and Simon 7:30 pm a Evening Magazine a Wheel of Fortune B We've Got It Made a Degrassi Junior High Melanie refuses lo iom race when she's teased about her first bra B M'A'S'H 1:00 pm a Th* Cosby Show Theo and Cockroach struggle with Shakespeare's Julius Caesar, a Sledge Hammer! Sledge broadcasts a warning to a terrifying, litethreatenmg caller B Mysteries of th* Rock-Dwelling Predators 11987) Follow the complex. violent mteration in and around Africa's kopjes. a Great Steam Trains Travels with a Outchess part 1 8 MOVIE: See No Evil (197!) A blind girl is victimized by a killer in cowboy boots Mia Farrow. Robin Bailey (1 29) a MOVIE: Th* Sins of Dorian Gray (1983) A beautiful young woman trades her soul to retain youth and beauty. Anthony Perkins. Joseph Bottoms (1:40) 8:30 pm a A Different World Dwayne is caught climbing out of Whitley s window after midnight a Th* Charmings Lillian enthusiastically grooms a girl in witchery. (May be preempted) a Wild America Some curse the coyote as a cold blooded killer, others welcome it Marty Stoutter (0:30) 9:00 pm a Ch**r* Sam hustles to get Carla and Eddie married by a certain time a MOVIE: Best Delense ABC Thursday Night Movie (1964) A luckless engineer stumbles onto lop secret plans (May be preempted) Dudley Moore. Helen Shaver (1 34) a Wls*guy Vinnie searches tor the punk who mugged his mother 8 Cousteau Odyssey Riders of the Wind 9:30 pm a Night Court A tipsy Christine nearly incites a riot in a male strip bar a Facts ol Life 10:00 pm a L.A. Law Woman who buys Arme in an auction wants her money's worth B Knots Landing Abby is shocked that the police do not believe her conlession B Soldiers: A History 01 Men In Settle Cavalry B Hill Street Blues B News B Night Gallery 10:30 pm a M'A'S'H B Night Gallery 11:00pm BBB News B SCTV 10 30) a Barney Miller B Late Show B Odd Couple 11:30 pm a Tonight Show a Nightline a Night Heet CBS Late Night O'Brien and Giambone enter the world ol child pornographers. B Helmet Six thousand men arrive to build the Reichshohenstrasse B MOVIE: Second Hand Hearts (1981) Two down and out losers are given a second chance with each other floftert Blake Barbara Harris (1 37) B All in the Femily 12:00 em a MOVIE: Mechine Gun McCain 11970/ Paroled convict plots a one man heist of a gambling casino John Cassavetes Bntt Aland (1.34) B McMillan and Wife B Koiek 12:30 am a Late Night with David Letterman B MOVIE: The Deedly Triangle CBS Late Movie (7977; A former skier, now a sheriff, investigates the shooting ol a skier Dale Robinette. Taylor Lacher 1:00 am ffl Untouchables 1:30 am a Love Connection 8 Sign Off a Discover S MOVIE: That Kind of Women (I9S9I Two soldiers fall in love with girls with disreputable pasts Tab Hunter Sophia lorn (1 32) 2:00 am a Hour Magazine a Perspective a Nightwatch a Matchmakers B Sign Off 2:30 am a Sign Off a MOVIE: The Great Waltz (1972) Story ol composer conductor Johann Strauss and his rise to greatness. Horst Bucholz Mary Costa (2 15) 3:00 am a Getting In Touch ' 3:30 em a Record Guide m MOVIE: Qrayeagie (1978) Ben John son Iron Eyes Cody 4:00 am O $100,000 Pyramid 4:30 am a Sign Off 4:45 am a Bizarre FRIDAY October 23 Complete weekday morning and efternoon listing* can be found on page 16. 6:00 pm a O B News a MacN*il/ Lehrer NewsHour (1:00) 8 Ditfrent Strokes a Family Ties a Gimme a Break! 6:30 pm a NBC Nightly News O ABC News 8 CBS News a Feet* of Life a Too Close for Comfort B AH in the Family 7:00 pm a People's Court a Jeopardy! a Entertainment Tonight Guest: Madeline Kahn a Louis Rukeyser look* at the new Pennsylvania A look at Pennsylvania a Jefferson* B Family Ti*s B Simon and Simon 7:30 pm a Ev*ning Magazine a Wheel of Fortune B Out of Thia Work) a WKRP in Cincinnati a M'A'S'H 6:00 pm a Rags to Riches A group of parents try to get an off-beat teacher fired O MOVIE: The Flamingo Kid ABC Movie Special ('984i Brooklyn boy is seduced by the good life at a Long Island beach club Matt Dillon. Richard Crenna (1:40) B II'* the Great Pumpkin. Charlie Brown The spirit ol Halloween bewitches the Peanuts gang, especially Linus B DC Weak Rvw. B Best of the National Geographic Specials 8 Halloween Hall of Fame B MOVIE: Donovan'* R**l (1963) A pnm Boston girl shows up and disturbs a peaceful island existence John Wayne Lee Marvin (1 49) 8:30 pm a Garfleld's Halloween Adventure Garfield and Odie are caught in a haunted house on Halloween night B Wall Street Weak (0 30) 9:00 pm a Miami Vice Famous Rastafanan singer's remains have been cryogenically frozen B Dallas Bobby goes on a rampage in a bar full of cowboys. 8 Adams Chronic!** John Adams is drawn into conflict between Britain and the colonies. 8 Best of Netional Geographic S Wonderful World of Disney 10:00 pm a Private Ey* Rock star Billy Ray is found dead at the bottom of a pool. 8 20/20 B Falcon Creat Both Richard Channing and John Remick offer lo help Maggie pay Angela a Adams Chronicle* Adams serves as a delegate to Constitutional Congress in Philadelphia a Friday Night Ringside BNews a National Geographic: On 10:30 pm a M'A'S'H 11:00pm aeanew* a SCTV (0 30) In ilu crispness of early autumn, we realize il can be easy In jus! sil and watch television til the cows come home..uth Street urges its readers to watch tv with care. 16 / 34th Street October 22, 1987

31 STREETEEQ3 IB Barney Miller C Late Snow 0 Odd Couple 11:30 pm a Tonight Show O Nighthne 03 Top of the Pops CBS Late Night Guest stars include Bon Jovi. Pel Shop Boys. Jody Walley and KISS, to MOVIE: Dr. Who: City ot Death Plot to steal the Mona Lisa sends the Doctor on a macabre mission. (1.30) 0 MOVIE: Being There (1979) An innocent gardener becomes the guru of the world's rich and famous Peter Sellers Shirley MacLaine (2 10) O All in the Family 12:00 am O MOVIE: MacGruder and Loud (1985) Officers investigate a crazed couple out to kill MacGruder John Get! Kathryn Hirrotd 0 Columbo Peler Falk (1 30) O Koiak 12:30 am O Late Night with David Letterman (D Night Stalker CBS Late Night Kolchak investigates the apparent suicides of wealthy women. 1:00 am 0B Sign Off O Untouchables 1:30 am O Friday Night Videos Series featuring the best in musical videos by top artists 1:45 am 0 MOVIE: Snatched (1972) Husband of kidnapped wife refuses to pay ransom Howard Dull. Leslie Nielsen (1:14) 2:00 am O MOVIE: Charlie Chan and the Sky Dragon (19491 Chan and his son find murder on a plane. Roland Winters. Keye Luke (1:04) MOVIE: Without a Trace A search for a missing child tests the courage of both mother and cop. Kate Nelligtn, JuddHirsch (200) SB Sign Off 2:1S am 0B Making of Santo Gold 2:30 am 0 Love Connection 2:45 am 09 Matchmakers 3:00 am 0 Hour Magazine 3:15 am O Perspective 03 MOVIE: Trouble Comes to Town (1972) Lloyd Bridges. Pat Mingle (1:14) MOVIE: Tell Me My Name (1977) Arthur Hill. Barbara Barrie (119) 3:30 am O Sign Off 4:00 am 0 Getting in Touch MOVIE: Denver and the Rio Grande (1952) Edmond O'Brien Sterling Hayden (1:29) 4:30 am O Record Guide 4:40 am 83 MOVIE: What Are Best Friends For? (1973) TedBessell. Lee Grant (114) SATURDAY October 24 5:00 am O 1100,000 Pyramid Ask Dr. Ruth 5:30 am OB Delaware Valley Forum 6:00 am O Connections O Perspective CD People Making of Santo Gold 0 Man to Man 0 Temple Football 6:30 am a Vegetable Soup O Perspective Candy Apple News Keys to Success Jimmy Swaggart O.I.C. Funday 7:00 am Courageous Cat Chief Halftown Business Fee Voice of Victory 7:30 am 0 Muppeta a Captain Noah and His Magical Ark Young Universe Business File 700 Club World Tomorrow Kidso TV 1:00 am Gummi Bears Care Bear Family HeHo Kitty's Furry Tele Theater Business of Management Fat Albert 1:30 am a Smurfs O Little Clowns of Happytown O Muppet Bebies James Robison 0 Tom and Jerry 900 am a My Pet Monster SB Sesame Street as Jimmy Swaggart Wonderful World of Disney UWF Wresting 930 am a AN New Pound Puppies am Freggle Rock ~ Little Wizards I Pee Waa'a Playhouse i Nature, (1986)0 I 00) Dr. D. James Kennedy 83 WWF Wrestling Chsllenge 0) P O.W.W. 10:30 sm O Alvin and the Chipmunks O Real Ghostbusters 03 Mighty Mouse: New Adventures 11:00 am 0 ALF O Perspective: Delaware 03 Popaye and Son 03 The Collectors IB Herald of Truth 0 WWF Superstars of Wrestling Si MOVIE: Hesven with a Gun (19691 lenn Ford. Carolyn Jones (1 41) 11:30 am aj New Archies O Perspective: New Jersey 03 Teen Wolf 09 Flower Shop Choices We Face 12:00 pm O Foofur O College Football Doubleheader 03 CBS Storybreak 03 Woodwright's Shop Solid Gold (1:00) 0 Soul Train 12:30 pm O Check It Outl 03 Kidd Video 09 Victory Gerden 1:00 pm aj American Bandstand 03 Fan Club 03 Magic of Oil Painting ffi World Wids Wrestling 59 MOVIE: Invasion 11962) Edward Judd *o Tan (1 20) «) MOVIE: The Last Challenge (1967) Glenn Ford. Angie Dickinson (1.45) 1:30 pm O College Football 09 Joy of Painting 2:00 pm aj MOVIE: The Pleasure Seekers (1965) Ann-Margaret. Tony Franciosa (1:47) 0) Justin Wilson's Louisiana Cookm S Space Movie (1978) Neil Armstrong tzaldnn (1:18) 2:30 pm 09 New York's Master Chef's MOVIE: Voodoo Woman(1957)Maria English. Tom Camay (1-17) 3:00 pm O Motorweek '88 Si MOVIE: Day of the Evil Gun 11968) lenn Ford. Arthur Kennedy (1 33) 3:30 pm O College Football MOVIE: Dr. Who Buadn' Loose 4:00 pm O D.C. Follies New Saa Hunt 0 Buck Rogers 4:30 pm Q Essence B It's a Living 5:00 pm O Heroes: Made in the USA 03 NFL's Grestsst Games II 09 Rod end Reel Star Search (1 00) S New Monkees Fame 5:30 pm O Guinness Records House for All Seasons New Gidgel 6:00 pm OO News This Old House Norm Abram assesses the condition of Weatherbee Farm 03 Silver Spoons Small Wonder 0 MOVIE: Bend ot the River (1952) An outlaw turned scout finds his camp raided by a former comrade James Stewart Arthur Kennedy (131) 6:30 pm O NBC News CBS New* 0 Great Chefs of the West IMS What's Happening Now 7 00 pm Tales from the Darkstde ONews People Frugal Gourmet The frugal gourmet offers recipes tor pumpkin pie and pumpkin soup Webster SStar Trek: The Nest Generation trick Stewart. Jonathan Frakes (1:00) 7:30 pm City Lights O Prime Time Dom DsLuise fa Wild America Some curse the coyote as a cold blooded kimer, others welcome it Marty Startler (0 30) Mama's Family 1:00 pm Fecte of Ufa Natalie ions an ROTC training program in order to write a story B Ohara Ohara and Shaver take time from murder investigation to help a hooker B My Slater Sam Sam gets stuck with a couple ol good Samaritans as housaguesls Nature (1987) Relive the adventures of Dieter Plage and his team on the Galapagos 11 00) Stephen King's World of Horror Part II MOO) Mr. President MOVIE: Sheft (1971) Private eye tracks down the kidnapped daughter of a Harlem kingpin. Richard Roundtree Moses Gum (1-40) 8:30 pm O 227 Brenda and Calvin learn about parental responsibility by raising pig B Everything's Relative After Rae's home is burglarized, she moves in with Julian and Scott Woman In Priaon 9:00 pm 0 Golden Girls Rose. Dorothy and Blanche face their phobias B All-Star Gala at Ford's Theater (1987) Nancy Reagan. Don Johnson and others create an electric celebration B Leg Work Claire tries to prove a woman was killed by her lover not her husband. B Legacy of the Hollywood Blacklist (1987) Examine the impact of anh- Communist sentiment on moviedom and stars Burl Lancaster. B Jefferaons S New Adventures of Beans Baxter 9:30 pm B Amen When Amelia wins a car in the church raffle, she gets gambling fever. «NBA Basketball 63 Second Chance 10:00 pm B Hunter Racial tensions mount as Hunter and McCali investigate a shooting B Hotel A former female acquaintance ol Peter s starts an escort service. B Weat 57th CBS News primetime magazine John Ferrugia. Meredith Vieira B Comedy Tonight Doug Ferrari.Marg Smith Tom Kenny BNewa S WWF Wrestling Spotlight 10:30 pm a Trying Times Woman survives hilariously disastrous encounter with future in-laws. Rosama Arquette. David Byrne Taxi 11:00pm BOB News B Monty Python's Flying Circus The Most Awful Family in Britain Friday the 13th Runaway with the Rich and Famous Robin Leach 11:30 pm B Saturday Night Live B MOVIE: Friday the 13th, Part III (1982) A mad killer stalks a group of friends at a lakeside cottage Richard Brooker. Dana Kimmetl (1 35) B MOVIE: Pray for the Wildcats (1974) Four men take a motorcycle trip down the rugged Baia Peninsula. Andy Griffith. William Shatner (1 32) S3 Blake's 7 Rumors ol Death S MOVIE: Raid on Rommel (1971) Rommel's Panzer Division infiltrates Libya dunng World War II Richard Burton. John Calicos (139) 12:00 am B Oancin' on Air MOVIE: The Mummy (1959) Three archaeologists search lor a tomb ol an Egyptian princess Peter Cushmg Christopher Lee (1 28) 12:30 am 03 Sign Off 1:00 am O Saturday Night Dead Ebony Jet Showcase 1:30 am O MOVIE: The Lost World 11960) A professor leads a group on an expedition in search of lost world. Michael Rermie. Jill St John (1 38) B George Schlatter's Comedy Club SB Hit City MOVIE: Frozen Dead (1967; A scientist must thaw out some Nazis who were frozen since WWII Dana Andrews Anna Palk (1:35) 2:00am B Siskel 8 Ebert 8 the Movies Delaware Valley Forum National Geographic: On Assignment 2:30am O DC. Follies Entertainment This Weak Sign Off 3:00 sm a City Lights 0B Ted Kntght 3:30 em a This N That B ABC News B Charlies Angels a MOVIE: Frankenstein Created Woman (1967) Peter Cushmg. Susan Denoerg (I 32) a Chick It Out) 4:00 am B Sign Off B Ghost Stories 4:30 am a MOVIE: Every Man Needs One (19721 Connie Stevens. Ken Berry (1:14) SUNDAY October 25 5:00 am B Sign Off 8 Cartoons 5:15 am a QMHg.sn's Island S;30 stn a Vegetable Soup 600am a Lome Greene's New Wilderness OPerspeclive a erode m Man to Man B World Vision 6:01 am 0 Charlie's Angels 6:30 am O Wild Kingdom B Perspective B Meking of Santo Gold 8 Jimmy Swaggart 7:00 am B Connections Q Changes 03 Bravol 09 Sesame Street Bizarre a Ever Increasing Faith 7:30 am Q Dialogue 0 Horizona a World Tomorrow S Larry Jones 8:00 am O Sunday Today B Larry Ferrari 09 Sesams Street B Day of Discovery 63 Kidsongs 0 Comic Strip 8:30 sm 0 Mass 0 News Forum 8 Oral Roberta 0 Funtsstic World 9:00 am 0 Puerto Rlcan Panorama 0 CBS Sunday Morning 0 Sessme Street 0 Robert Schuller 9:30 sm o Meet the Preaa O Showcase of Homes 10:00 am 0 MOVIE: The Naked Prey (1966) Cornel Wilde, Gert Van Den Berg (134) O Business World O Wonderworks 11987) Alistair Sim 0 Dr. Jamas Kennedy 10:30 sm O Issues end Answers 03 Facs the Nation 0 Visionaries B Captain Power 11:00 am O This Week with David Brink ley 03 Siskel 8 Ebert 8 the Movies 0 Tony Brown's Journal 0 Jerry Felweil 0 Three Stooges 0 Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling 11:30 em O This Is the NFL a Stste of Pennsylvania Philadelphia Drama Guild ') S 7 Subscribe To Our Knlire Season For Only $29! ' mill il mil nl i III n III I nll-l IIIII -liiilriil -l.il n- x /. ** & <,' *>, * x SEASON Gel Three Plays FREE And The Best Seats! A Joyful StoryXXLove, Romance.mil Sclf-l)iNCOvcr\! yvms h\ Saflsjn Art Vt illutn- (X-l I6-Nm X The Tom Award-Winning Classic! The Miracle Worker hs Vt ilium dibson Mm 27-Det 20 V\ here The Sixties Meet The I-ighties Head < >n' Division Street t» Sieve rcich Jan IS-K-h 7 A Revolutionary New Staging! h> Vtilli.nu Shakespejre Mar II Apr ' A Comedy With Him Star Julie Hagerty! Born Yesterday Its (i.ir-iin K.IIIIM Apr N-MJ> 22 Philadelphia's nukh 1'ioK- mini theatre ZeUetbach Theatre Annenhere ("enter VvKtl Walnut Slrcei PLAY ask ailmtiii siuih iii i*rimi i ih-iu-r.lv l«u! 34th Street October 22, 1987 / 17

32 . STREET EM] pm MMI the Pnu S MOVIE 300 Spartans 1961) Mmi _l» 4HP" "lenarosori (1 54) Buddy Ryan #3 People s Business MOVIE. KM and Kin Again n98h i""---._ «MOVIE: 0»i Menl Oh Womanl 11957/ iy n^ndjf/ On uavfey {1 30) MOVIE. Tarian 12:30 pm NFL Liva NFL Today e Adam Smith s Monay World (0 30) 1:00 pm O NFL Football Doubleheader m NFL Football In Paraon 1:30 pm a McLaughlin Group 2:00 pm a War of tha Star* Tha Conatrtution: That Delicate Haw MOVIE: Up tha Sandboi 11972) Baton Streisand. David Setoy (1 38)! MOVIE: Suddanly (1954) Frank «n. Starling Hayden (117) m MOVIE: Dark of tha Sun i '9681 Rod Taylor fvette Mimieu* (1.37) 2:30 pm o Baal of the War of tha Stara 3:00 pm a Qraat Parformancaa Mikhail Baryshnikot Vaida Setterfieid 3:30 pm O Baakatball Opan 4:00 pm O NFL Football O NFL Wrap-Up B Wonderwork a '98' Ahslair Sim Baat of National Gaographic as MOVIE: Tha Cantarvilla Ghott ' 1986 S<' John Gieigud Andrea Marcovica m MOVIE: Whrta Haat 11949) James Cagney Virginia Mayo (154) 4:30 pm O Eaglas Wrap-Up 5:00 pm O Pann Stale Football 09 Upatain. Downatair* < '987) a Best of National Gaographic 6 00 pm Q Nawa ID CBS Nawa Adama Chrontclai John and his son, John Oumcy represent American interests abroad Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous m Throb MOVIE: Tha Sins of Dorian Gray /19831 A beautiful young woman trades her soul to retain youtn and beauty. F A I* L Ring, ring. Ring, ring, mk B Cood Mornu, \lwncwawin I: AA: I: AA: I: AA: J: AA: Mi lohn, it's stu- Anna. men is over ad a fish. -^^ Jt I need the woai> Thai I can't wait v.nt to loqjklke a person again mite of a.i risn. «- m Associates Let's see Hrfw about startinewi trr*ajabbl>jftfc the newest color crai-e. Red, Red " It will look great wjtjtypur tan. Then while you're processing, a manicure and a peaicure with Diane, then Viola's extra long exquisite shampoo and deep conditioner for that burnt out head of yours and a blow dry How Joes that sound? then a cut Expensive, but worth it. Let's do it I have to look ravishing I want my latest summer romance to last When you hear who he is, you'll scream How's Tuesday at 10 am Cireat, I'll get my real iewelry out of the vault and make dinner reservations at Deia Vu Perfect! He must be something Oh, put me down tor Lisa for mv face I want him to drop dead when he sees me looking like a lady Well drop Maurice Tannenbaum es Call 215-«77-8«o 0 r- v / M a u / 34th Street October c S t A P h i a d a I maybe iiist a t a s p h i a Anthony Perkins. Joseph Bottoms (140) 6:30 pm O Visions 8 News Puttm' on the Hita 7:00 pm o Our Houaa On Halloween like no other, the Witherspoon kids seek ghostly thrills 0 MOVIE: Shaggy Dog, Part 2 Disney Sunday Movie 11959) A teenage misfit is accidentally transformed into a lovable sheepdog Fred MacMurray Jean Hagen (B 60 Minutes 09 Myeteryl 11987) Harriet is cleared of murder but while walking finds a corpse (1 00) 01 Jimmy Swaggarl 8 21 Jump Street 1:00 pm o Family Ties Maiiory reluctantly takes an Internship position where Steven works O Spenser: For Hire Sexual harassment turns to violence and humiliation- (May be preempted) Murder, She Wrote Executive power play results in murder at a country estate 8 Thia Old Houae Architect Mary Otis Stevens describes proposed changes with a model Real to Reel m Werewolf 8 MOVIE: Taraa Bulba H962) Classic story of the Cossacks, depicting their fight for freedom Tony Curtis. YulBrynner (?02) 1:30 pm My Two Oada To please Nicole. Michael starts a relationship with t\9r babysitter, a Frugal Gourmet Jeff prepares oyster corn bread stuffing, and turkey and capers a Jany Faiweil 9:00 pm a MOVIE: Bay Coven NBC Sunday Night at the Movies 11987) Couple suspects their neighbor of belonging to a witches coven Pamela Sue Martin. Tim Matheson O MOVIE: Scarface 11983/ A Cuban hood conquers a cocaine empire (May be preempted) Ai Pacino Michelle Pleitler (2 54) a MOVIE: Family Sins CBS Sunday Movie 11987) Family s incomprehension of nature of their situation breeds tragedy James Farentmo. Jill Cikenberry a Maaterpiece Theatre 11987) Jean and Martha are both smitten with the same man a Tracey Uliman Show 9:30 pm a Delaware Valley Forum a Duet 1000 pm a To The Manor Bom a In Touch Miniatriea a News 10:30 pm a Solo a taxi 1100 pm ee News 8 Trying Times An art history professor decides to learn to drive Teri Garr Ron Silver a Star Trek: The Neat Generation Patrick Stewart Jonathan Frakes (1.00) a Runeway with the Rich and Famous nlomn lajol 11:30 pm a MOVIE: The Big Fix (1978) Private eye searches tor person who is framing a liberal politician Richard Dreytuss Susan Ansoach (1 48) a Sunday Sports Final a Avengers Masterminds a Reverend Port*)* 8 MOVIE White Heat (19491 Ruthless Sangster has a mother complex James tgney Virginia Mayo (1 54) 11:45 pm a CBS Newa 1200 am a Nawa «'rocta N Wav ' T '*" " Pa "* nl a Kenneth Copelend 12:30am a MOVIE: The Priest Kilter f'svi) Killer murders Catholic priests a Sign Off 100 am a Entertain Thia Week Guest Denzel Washington a Sign Off a Jimmy Swaggarl 1:30 am a George Michael's Sport. Macmne 2 00 am a 8 8 Sign Off a MOVIE Draaaed to Kill brier lock Homes is pitted against a female opponent. Hilda Courtney Basil Rathhon^fiatrioa Morison (112) a Nightwatch 4 00 am a Issues and Answers MONDAY October 26 Complete weekday morning and after noon listings can be found on page It 6 00pm OOB News ate;s\ro h k r :. N,w,How,,oo» a Family Ties a Gimme a Breekl 6:30 pm a NBC Nightly Newa a ABC Newa a CBS Newa a Facts of Life S3 Too Close for Comfort O All in the Family 7:00 pm a People's Court O Jeopardy 1 a Entertainment Tonight Guest: Whoopi Goldberg a Nightly Business Report a Jerfersona O Family Tiea a All in the Family 7:30 pm a Evening Magazine a Wheel of Fortune a You Cen't Take It with You Greenhouse Blues a World of Survival Badger a WKRP in Cincinnati G M-A'S"H a NHL Hockey 8:00 pm a ALF ALF takes center stage at the Halloween bash Willie throws B MacGyver A close friend of MacGyver's is murdered during an investigation a Frank'a Piece Hanna has second thoughts about her fiance. Lamar a Delaware River, Delaware Bay a MOVIE: A Change of Seasons 11980) A wife finds her husband is having an affair with one of his students Shirley Madame Bo Derek (1:42) a MOVIE: Max Dugan Ratuma 11983) Dying man suddenly reenters the lives of daughter and grandson Jason Rooards Marsha Mason (1 39) 8:30 pm a The Storyteller A carefree young man has an inability to experience tear John Hurt a Kate 8 Allte Kate sets up her friend Angela with her ex boyfriend 09 Relusemks A Family Divided 9:00 pm a MOVIE: The Seduction of Joe Tynan (1979) A young unior senator seizes the chance for national publicity Alan A/da Barbara Harris (1:47) a ABC Monday Night Football Rams at Browns (L) (Tentative) a Newhart A Halloween party is interrupted by news of an alien invasion a Oil Gadhali sets pace for price rises as OPEC announces increases 9:30 pm a Designing Women Suzanne's ex-husband turns up to announce he's contemplating suicide 10:00 pm a Cagney and Lacey Cagney and Lacey find one of their early cases resulted in injustice a America by Deaign See how farming, strip mining and highways affect shape of the land a Hill Street Blues a Newa 10:30 pm a M'A'S'H a Night Gallery 11 oo pm a a News 8 SCTV (0 30) a Bamey Miller a Late Snow a Odd Couple 11:30 pm a Tonight Show Guest Host Jay Leno a Hunter CBS Late Night A girl strolling through tha park with her boyfriend is killed a Auatln City Limlta (1987) The Legendary Neville Brothers perform. along with Ftockin Sidney. a MOVIE: A Fine Pair 11969) A lovely Italian girl asks a NYC cop to help her regain stolen gems Am* Hudson Claudia Cardinale (1 29) a All In the Family 12:00 am a Newa a Columbo Peter Falk (1 30) 8Ko ak 12:30 am a Late Night with David Letterman a Nightllne 83 MOVIE Mrs R's Daughter CBS Late Movie (1979) True story of mother's battle to bring daughter s rapist to trial Claris Leachman Season hwmry (1:40) B Sign Off 1:00 am a MOVIE: Ten RiMmgton Place Criminal case leads to abolishment of capital punishment in England Richard Attenborough John Hurt (1.51) O Untouchables 1 30 am a Love Connection a Making of Santo Gold a MOVIE: Scorchy ((976. Scorchy undercover agent, declares war on a group of drug smugglers Conm. Stevens William Smith (f 36) 200 am a Hour Magazine 8 Nightwatch a Matchmakers a Sign Off 230am a MOVIE: The Three Musketeers 11939) Three lackeys masquerade as the Three Musketeers fttt wtxftars Don Ameche (1 13) 3:00 am a Getting in Touch 3:15 em a Perapective

33 STREET EFTT1 3:30 am O Record Quid* 0 MOVIE: The Butler Keaton Story (1957) Donald O'Connor Ann Blyth (1:31) 3:45 am Q Sign Off 4:00 am o $100,000 Pyramid 4:30 am O Sign Off TUESDAY October 27 Complete weekday morning and afternoo^lmlnjaeai^yfoundojpageie. 6:00 pm 0 Q Newt 03 MacNeil/ Lehrer NewtHour (1:00) 03 Ditf'rent SlroKes 0 Family Tiet (S Gimme a Break! 6:30 pm O NBC Nightly Newt O ABC Nawa 0 CBS Newa 09 Facte of Life 60 Too Clote for Comfort IB All in trie Family 7 00 pm o People'! Court O Jeopardy (D Entertainment Tonight Michael Landon is profiled 09 Nightly Buaineat Report 09 Jeneraons 0 Family Tiet 0 Odd Couple 7:30 pm o Evening Magaiine O Wheel of Fortune 83 Marblehead Manor Full Oress 09 World of Survival Golden Eagle 09 MOVIE: Montignor (1982) An ambitious young priest must wrestle with moral and human desires Christopher Reeve. Jason Miller (202) 0 M-A'S'H 0 NHL Hockey 8:00 pm 0 Mattock Mattock defends a Washington columnist accused of killing her source. O Who's the Boas? Tony tries to fix up Samantha with the new kid In town. O Top Flight Celebrate the 40th anniversary of the U S. Air Force 09 Nova Nova profiles modern day inventor Stanlord Ovshinaky. 0 MOVIE: The Deep (1977) Young couple on a Bermuda holiday stumble upon mysterious treasures. Robert Shaw Jacqueline Bisset (2:03) 8:30 pm O Growing Pains Mike lands the lead in his school play, hoping to score points 9:00 pm O J.J. Starbuck Phony children s book author turns his ghostwriter into a real ghost O Moonlighting David makes a shocking confession he was once married. (R) 03 Jake and the Fatman The Fatman plays cat and mouse with a serial murderer The Ring of Truth 11987) Look at the experiments proving matter Is equivalent to energy 10:00 pm o Crime Story O thirtytomething An evening out for Michael and Hope degenerates into a shouting match. OX The Law and Harry McGraw Murder disrupts a high stakes poker game with a legendary gambler. The Story of Engllah 11986) Trace the Scottish influence from Northern Ireland to America 09 Hill Street Bluet 0 Newt 10:30 pm 0 M-A'S'H 0 Night Gallery 11:00 pm O O 03 Nawa 01 SCTV 0 30) Barney Miller 0 Late Show O Odd Couple 11:30 pm O Tonight Show Guest Host: Jay Leno O Nightline 03 Night Heat CBS Late Night Major drug bust turns sour. O'Brien suspects a cop of complicity (R) 0 Oil (1987) Gadhafi sets pace for price rises as OPEC announces increases. MOVIE: Fighting Mad (1976) A young man finds his lather being pressured to sell the family ranch Peler Fonda. Lynn Lowry (1 28) 0 AH In the Family 12:00 am a MOVIE: Minnie and MotkowrU (1971) A lifted Protestant woman and a hippy type Jewish man share a romance. Gena Rowlands. Seymour Cassel (1:54) McCtoud Dennis Weaver 0 Kojak 12:30 am Late Night with David Letterman Guests Richard Lewis; Dave Mason O MOVIE: Fire on the Mountain CBS Late Movie (1981) Crusty old timer refuses when the Army asks him to vacate his ranch Ron Howard Buddy Ebsen (1.40) 09 Sign Off 1:00 am 3t Untouchables 1:15 am 09 Contumer Challenge 1:30 am 09 Love Connection 1:45 am 09 Matchmakers 2:00 am O Hour Magaiine 83 Nightwatch 03 MOVIE: Monkey Miaaion Private eye is hired to recover a British family's priceless antique Robert Blake Keenan Wynn (1 36) 0 Sign Off 2:15 am Q Perspective MOVIE: Tortilla Flat (1942/ Story depicting the Mexican peasants life and poverty in California. Spencer Tracy. Hedy Lamarr (1:45) 2:30 am O Sign Off 3:00 am O Getting in Touch 3:30 am a Record Guide 4:00 am 0 TBA S MOVIE: That Certain Feeling Bob Hope. Eva Marie Saint (1 43) 4:30 am 0 Sign Off 0 Aak Dr. Ruth WEDNESDAY October 28 Complete weekday morning and after noon llatlnga can be found on page 16. 6:00 pm 0 O O Newa 0 MacNeil/ Lehrer NewtHour (1:00) 0 Ditf'rent Strokat 0 Family Tiet 0 Gimme a Breakl 6:30 pm 0 NBC Nightly Newt 0 ABC Newa 83 CBS Newa 0 Facta of Ufa 0 Too Clote tor Comfort 0 All in the Family 7:00 pm 0 People't Court O Jeopardy! O Entertainment Tonight Dennis Ouaid discusses his new movie 0 Nightly Butineaa Report I Family Tiet 0 Simon and Simon 7:30 pm O Evening Magazine O Wheel of Fortune 0 She'a the Sheriff Max Moves In 09 World of Survival trumpeter Swan O WKRP in Cincinnati 0 M'A'S'H 8:00 pm O Highway to Heaven A boy is separated from r-'s sister while trick or treating O Pa-fect gara Larry discovers Balki and 'or sneaking around behind his UOCK 0 The Oldest Rookie Routine case turns up witness who links powerful developer to murder O The Infinite Voyage See through the eyes of science what is beyond everyday experience 0 MOVIE: Halloween (197ft An escaped psychotic murderer stalks three young babysitters. Donald Pleasence. Jamie Lee Curtis (1 34) 0 Return of the Titanic 0 MOVIE: The Creature 11985) Astronauts revive a monster that eats human brains. Stan War Wendy Schaal (1:37) 8:30 pm o Head of the Claaa Oarlene and Sarah vie lor the attentions of a cute new guy 9:00 pm 0 A Year in the Life A visit from a former flame rekindles Anne s romantic feelings O Hooperman Hooperman enlists the aid of a psychic to identity a murder victim 0 Magnum, P.I. Hired to solve a routine case. Magnum is frustrated by an impediment 0 Firing Line Candidate Special The first joint appearance of the Republican presidential candidates 9:30 pm o Slap Maxwell Story Slap reveals a streak of sensitivity when he saves a newsboy's life. 10:00 pm 0 SL Elaewhare Craig performs his first artificial heart transplants.on sheep 0 Dynatty Adam and Dana face a major difficulty as newfyweds 0 The Equalizer When McCall is kidnapped, friends and foe team up to find him. 0 Hill Street Bluet Km 0 Night Gallery 10:30 pm 0 M'A'S'H 0 Night Gallery 11:00 pm o O 83 Newt O SCTV Barney Miller Late Show 0 Odd Couple 11:30 pm O Tonight Show Guest Host Jay Leno O Nightline 0 Adderty CBS Late Night When ISI headquarters are bugged. Adderly thinks it s a diversion (H) O Nova Nova profiles modern day inventor Stanlord Ovshmsky. O MOVIE: Killer by Night 1197II Doctor battles to stop a dipthena outbreak Robert Wagner. Diane Baker (1 40) 0 All In the Family 12:00 am o MOVIE: The Meduaa Touch (1978) A detective inv^s'i^es an attack on a mn '.a.akinetic powers /»'-"»" Lino Ventura (150) 0 Columbo i '30) O Kojak 12:30 am O Late Night with David Letterman Guests Art Buchwaid. Jami Gertz 0 MOVIE: Looking To Get Out CBS Late Movie 11982) Two likeable losers flee New York after welching on a $10,000 debt Jon Votqhl. Ann Margaret (120) O Sign Off 1:00 am o Untouchablea 1:30 am o Love Connection 0 Weight Control 0 MOVIE: Devil's Eight (1969) A federal agent goes undercover to rescue six convicts on a road gang. Christopher George Fabian (1:37) 2:00 am 0 Hour Magazine 0 Nightwatch 0 Matchmakera 0 Sign Off 2:30 am O Perspective 0 MOVIE: The Philadelphia Story ff94ft Story of Philadelphia family and Its concern for daughter s marriage Katharine Hepburn James Stewart (1:52) 2:45 am O Sign Off 3:00 am O Getting In Touch 0 MOVIE: The Model and the Marriage Broker (f95?; Jeanne Cram. Scott Brady (1:43) 3:30 am 0 Record Guide 4 00 am O TBA 4:30 am 0 Sign Off V< \ 4 \ ffimt ;s %r\* &* F*E FOO awi TOKII&S/ izffsj.a COSTWMC/A wee* BAKtV.'.' oae#>. COMMONS I d«w**«--fo»-2.,d.44 ' \v 34th Street October / 19

34 STREETHEE3 J i The film guide Is effective Friday. BABY BOOM A Hop ol a feminist manifesto lakes off when Diane Keaton goes lo work (Sam's Place, 19th and Chestnut Sts ) BIG SHOTS Calling Steven Speilberg. come in Mr SpeilDerg (AMC Palace 18I2 Chestnut St ) DANCERS BarysnnikO'. Ml own toes by embellishing un a him version of Giselle (which is nol Swan Lake ) REVIEW. PAGE 6 (Samenc Cheslnut St ) DIRTY DANCING It's not exactly the American Ballet Theatre, but it's not mashed potatoes either (Eric Rittennouse Walnut St ) ENEMY TERRITORY Who's Ray Parker Jr gonna call this lanw BIRDSONGS OF THE MESOZOIC w/willie ALEXANDER Boston-based outfit, leatunng an exmember of Mission of Burma, performs an eclectic collection ol odd and avant-garde rock Thursday (Bacchanal South Si.. 545*983) PHILADELPHIA ORCHESTRA Hans Vonk. chiel conduclor of the Dresden Staatskapelle. makes his Philadelphia debut with Hayden's "Symphony No 82," Sessions' 'Concerto lor Orchestra'' and Schuman's "Symphony No 2." Thursday through Tuesday. (Academy ol Music. Broad and Locust Sts, ) RED HOT CHILI PEPPERS w/faith NO MORE Funk/rap/hardcore crews kick out some heavy-duty grooves Don't forget your lingerie And remember, put a sock on it INTERVIEW. PAGE 13 Thursday (Chestnut Cabaret 38th and Chestnut Sts ) SCHOOLY D 52nd and Parkside s favorite son mumbles out the hardest and delest rhymes around Thursday (Revival. 22 South Third St ) CELIBATE RIFLES * THE BIG THING Five lads from the land down under crank out melodic, punk-grunge the likes of which haven't been heard since 1977 Friday (Revival. 22 South Third St ) PHILADELPHIA SINGERS Choral group kicks off its season with performances of Persichelti's Flower Songs." PetrassTs "Nonsense" and Gmastera s "Lamentations " Friday (Holy Trinity Church Rittennouse Square ) TOOTS ANO THE MAYTALS Reggae legends let the Pressure Drop while taking a musical trp through Funky Kingston Friday and Saturday (Chostnut Cabaret. 38th and Chestnut Sts ) URBAN FALL w/the WISHNIAKS Young locals are on their way lo bigger and better things Complimentary soda will nol be served Friday (Khyber Pass. 56 S Second St ) LOUIE BLUIE ARMSTRONG AND TED BOGAN 20 / 34th Street October 22, 1987 time? (AMC Midlown Cheslnut St ) FATAL ATTRACTION People magazine says it can happen lo you. so believe it. Beware of crazed, knife-wielding ex-mistresses (AMC Olde City Cinema, Second and From Sts ) HELLO MARY LOU: PHOM NIGHT 2 Possession is rune-lenths of the law. so when Mary Lou makes a comeback. watch the heck out (Eric's Place Cheslnut St ) HEY BABU RIBA It's Yugoslavian. Wop boba lu bop a wop bam boom. (Ritz V. 214 Walnut St ) IN THE MOOD He's 'in the mood' lor love. simply because older women are near him lunny but when they're near him he's in the mood' to elope (Eric Ritlenhouse Walnut St, ) I VE HEARD THE MERMAIDS SINGING And you thought U2 was a religious experience Toronto newcomer Patricia Rozema makes a splash (Rilz V. 214 Walnul St, ) THE KILLING TIME Keiler Sutherland didn't shoot the sheriff, but he might've killed the deputy (AMC Walnut Mall, 3925 Walnut St ) LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON Like Freaky Friday on testosterone (Eric 3 On the Campus. 40th and Walnut Sts ) A MAN IN LOVE France's Diane Kurys produces another sexy, cosmopolitan film (Ritz V, 214 Walnut St, ) MATEWAN Look lor the union label when you are buying a ticket for John Sayles' latest opus (Rilz V, 214 Walnut St ) MAURICE The makers of A Room with a View produce another elegant English film, this time about sexual repression in British society REVIEW NEXT WEEK (Rilz V. 214 Walnul St ) NIGHTFLYERS The spaceship s moving but there's no one al the wheel REVIEW NEXT WEEK (Samenc Chestnut St, ) JONATHAN RICHMAN AND THE MODERN LOVERS The oldest living twerp hooks up wilh Pablo Picasso for a wild ride with a Road Runner Tuesday (Cheslnut Cabaret, 38th and Chestnut Sis ) One of the few remaining black string bands, the duo will perform a variety of high-spirited jigs, reels, waltzes, rags and minstrel/medicine show material Saturday (International House Chestnut St ) ERNOIDS w/tim BRITTON Cherry Tree Music Co-op presents a unique hybrid ol traditional Irish and various world rhythms. Sunday (St Mary's Church, 3916 Locust Walk ) HEART Two sisters go searching for barracudas and dreams Sunday (Spectrum. Broad St and Pattison Ave ) SONIC YOUTH w/live SKULL and VAN GOHS EAR Critically acclaimed noise'' bands from the Lower East Side torture their instruments to get oul some ol the most interesting sounds around Warning Falling asleep to a Sonic Youth record may result in dreams about car accidents Sunday (Cheslnut Cabaret. 38th and Chestnut Sts ) WINOBREAKERS w/yo LA TENGO and BOBBY SUTLIFF Enjoyable West Coasl rockers play a classical style ol college/pop music Sunday (JC Dobbs. 304 South St, ) CONCERTO SOLOISTS CHAMBER ORCHESTRA Music Director Marc Mostovoy leads the soloists through Telemann's "Don Ouixote Suite." Zelenka's "Capprico No 1 in D Major" and Bach's "Brandenburg Concerto No 4 in G Major " Monday (Walnut Street Theatre. 825 Walnut St ) ROYAL CRESENT MOB w NIXON S HEAD Celluloid recording artists successlully mix the sounds of Ohio Players-style lunk and hard rock guitars Monday (JC Dobbs. 304 South St ) FLEETWOOD MAC w/cruzados Rumours that (he band, sans Lmdsey Buckingham, is back in lorm are nothing but a Mirage Wednesday (Spectrum. Broad St and Pattison Ave, ) CLAUOIA SCHMIDT Highly acclaimed woman with the voice ol a rainbow defies pigeon holing Wednesday (Painted Bride. 230 Vine St ) NO MAN S L AND Going from Vietnam to vice. Charlie Sheen resurfaces as a high-class car thief REVIEW NEXT WEEK (AMC Midlown, 1412 Cheslnut St ) PRINCE OF DARKNESS John Carpenter, the man who brought you Halloween, celebrates the season by bringing you another surprise REVIEW NEXT WEEK (AMC Walnut Mall, 3925 Walnut St, ) THE PRINCESS BRIOE A kissing movie smacks into a screwball comedy (Eric 3 On the Campus, 40th and Walnut Sts ) THE PRINCIPAL James belushi. the principled principal, looks lor control in an out-ol-hand high school (Eric 3 On the Campus. 40th and Walnut Sts ) THE SICILIAN In hopes of rebounding Irom the Heaven's Gale debacle. Michael Cimino returns wilh a film version of the Mario Puzo novel REVIEW NEXT WEEK (Samenc 4, 1908 Chestnut St, ) SOMEONE TO WATCH OVER ME In Ridley Scott's very grown-up adven tures in babysitting, Queens cop Tom Berenger protects socialite Mimi Rogers (AMC Olde City Cinema, Second and Front SIS ) SUSPECT Courtroom shenanigans provide a confusing backround for the stellar pairing ol Cher and Dennis Quaid REVIEW, PAGE 6. (Eric 3 On the Campus, 40th and Walnut Sts ) REPERTORY AND VIDEO ROXY SCREENING ROOM THEATER ONE Oriane A younq woman unravels the mystery of her maiden aunt in this Venezuelan/ French production that won the Camera D'Or (Best First Film) at Cannes in 1985 THEATER TWO: The Pornographers Shohei Imamura's acclaimed 1966 black comedy about Japan's X-rated film industry stands the test of time In Japanese (2021 Sansom St ) TEMPLE CINEMATHEQUE FRIDAY, SATURDAY & MONDAY: Sinbad and Targets TUESDAY The Wandering Jew WEDNESDAY 4 THURSDAY The Private Lives ol Elizabeth and Essex (1619 Walnut St ) THEATER! ART THE BARBER OF SEVILLE See Figaro and the Count vie lor the affections of fair Rosina. while at the same time working against the ambitions ol the aged Dr Barlolo Through this weekend (Pennsylvania Opera Theater, 1345 Chestnut St., ) THE CHERRY ORCHARD Tragedy blends with comedy, not unlike real lile, with some line performances to boot REVIEW. PAGE 15 (Tomlinson Theater. 13th and Norris Sis ) LADY DAY Musical on the lite ol legendary singer Billie Holliday kicks off the resurrection season ol TLA REVIEW NEXT WEEK (Theatre ol Living Arts, 334 South St ) MACBETT Fair is loul, foul is lair, even according to the asbsurd theater of lonesco (Wilma Theater, 2030 Sansom St ) NOISES OFF This oil-beat and silly British comedy details the lives ol an acting troupe as they take their show on the road Opens Oct (Walnut Street Theatre. Ninth and Walnul Sts ) NUNSENSE Still Hying high after all these years (Society Hill Playhouse. 507 S Eighth Si 923*210) RAP MASTER RONNIE Trudeau show locuses on the agin' administration and greatest mistakes ol the Greal Communicator himsell (On Stage Theater Sansom St. SEX TIPS FOR MODERN GIRLS Sexist and stereotypical show examines, in an often sexually explicit manner, the state ol women in the '80s as they supposedly see themselves For the real stuff, stick with Cynthia Heimel REVIEW. m^rs'r."'" Playhou5e S" 7 S 8th St. SONG ANO DANCE Melissa Manchester fills Bernadette Peters role well, but this Andrew Lloyd Webber show ust doesn 1 live up to the hype (Forrest Theater, 1114 Walnut Si ) ART IN SPACE Catch a sneak preview ol the first nonscientific payload scheduled for Ihe space shuttle, and other pieces by sculptor Lowry Burgess. (Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts. Broad and Cherry Sts ) DUCHAMP CENTENNIAL EXHIBITION The centennial ol the artist's birth is celebrated in this informative took (Philadelphia Museum ol Art, Parkway at 26th St ) HALLOWEEN Yes, the big holiday will soon be here, and with it. the opening ol "Mascaras" Dance Masks From Mexico and Guatemala (Indigo, 107 S 22nd St., ) RAPE Using a variety ol artistic media. 19 contemporary artists display their reactions lo and comments on the crime. Many of Ihe artists are victims. (Philadelphia An Alliance. 251 S 18th St ) COMEDY WORKS This week's features: New York Mike Reynold. Talk 900s Lee Fielding and David Sayh (Comedy Works. 126 Chestnut St. WACKY-97) MARXISM IN THE USA Prolessor Paul Buhle autographs copies of his new book after a discussion of his views on the future of American radicalism Tonight (House ol Our Own Bookstore, 3920 Spruce SI, ) WILLIAM PENN The Historical Society presents two show ings ol 1942s The Courageous Mr. Penn. described as The Rocky Horror Picture Show of the William Penn cult Wednesday (Historical Society ol Pennsylvania Locust St ) AMBASSADOR KEYES Deputy Assistant Secretary ol State lor International Organization Affairs speaks on The False Equation Israel and South Africa." November 3 (Jewish Community Center ol Greater Philadelphia. 401 South Broad St )

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