PIANOMAN * SKAGIT * WATERSHED WATCH STORM WARNING. Michael Kaeshammer's limitless talent, P.18 ALPS ALERT

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1 THE GRISTLE, P.06 + FREE WILL ASTROLOGY, P.24 + CAMBER, P.30 c a s c a d i a REPORTING FROM THE HEART OF CASCADIA ISLAND COUNTIES ISSUE:46 V.12 WHATCOM * SKAGIT * WATERSHED WATCH State of the Sound, P.08 STORM WARNING Blessings of a blowdown, P.14 PIANOMAN Michael Kaeshammer's limitless talent, P.18 ALPS ALERT Sing-A-Long Sound of Music, P.15

2 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 2 c a s c a d i a Curtis Salgado will headline a Legends of the Blues V concert Sat., Nov. 18 at Arlington s Byrnes Performing Arts Center THURSDAY [ ] ONSTAGE The 39 Steps: 7pm, Sehome High School Little Theatre Little Women: 7pm, Ferndale High School Peter and the Star Catcher: 7pm, Squalicum High School Romeo, You Idiot!: 7:30pm, Heiner Theater, WCC Fools: 7:30pm, Mount Baker High School Good, Bad, Ugly: 8pm, Upfront Theatre The Project: 10pm, Upfront Theatre MUSIC Jazz Walk: 6-11pm, five locales throughout downtown Bellingham Jansen Jazz Band: 7:30pm, Jansen Art Center, Lynden FOOD Eat for the Arts: 8am-11pm, throughout downtown Bellingham VISUAL Home for the Holidays: 5-9pm, Ferndale Events Center FRIDAY [ ] ONSTAGE The 39 Steps: 7pm, Sehome High School Little Theatre Little Women: 7pm, Ferndale High School Peter and the Star Catcher: 7pm, Squalicum High School Stock up on locally procured Thanksgiving fixings at Holiday Farmers Markets happening Sat., Nov. 18 in Bellingham and Mount Vernon, and Nov in Anacortes Romeo, You Idiot!: 7:30pm, Heiner Theater, WCC Fools: 7:30pm, Mount Baker High School Betty Desire: 7:30pm, Lincoln Theatre, Mount Vernon The Big Short: 7:30pm, McIntyre Hall, Mount Vernon Backyard Brawl: 8pm and 10pm, Upfront Theatre DANCE Bellingham Rep s Emerge: 7:30pm, Firehouse Performing Arts Center New Music, New Dance: 7:30pm, Performing Arts Center, WWU ThisWeek A glance at this week s happenings MUSIC Uncle Bonsai: 7:30pm, Fairhaven Library WWU Symphony Orchestra: 7:30pm, Performing Arts Center, WWU FOOD Hamster Ball: 6:30-10:30pm, Bellingham Cruise Terminal VISUAL Home for the Holidays: 9:30am-9pm, Ferndale Events Center Holiday Festival of the Arts: 10am-7pm, daily through Christmas Eve Holiday Market: 12-9pm, NW Washington Fairgrounds, Lynden SATURDAY [ ] ONSTAGE The 39 Steps: 7pm, Sehome High School Little Theatre Little Women: 7pm, Ferndale High School Peter and the Star Catcher: 7pm, Squalicum High School Romeo, You Idiot!: 7:30pm, Heiner Theater, WCC Fools: 7:30pm, Mount Baker High School The Big Short: 7:30pm, McIntyre Hall, Mount Vernon Backyard Brawl: 8pm and 10pm, Upfront Theatre DANCE Contra Dance: 7-10:30pm, Eagles Hall Bellingham Rep s Emerge: 7:30pm, Firehouse Performing Arts Center New Music, New Dance: 7:30pm, Performing Arts Center, WWU MUSIC A Light in the Darkness: 7pm, Church of the Assumption Michael Kaeshammer: 7:30pm, Mount Baker Theatre Legends of the Blues: 7:30pm, Byrnes Performing Arts Center, Arlington COMMUNITY Winterfest: 10am-4pm, Van Zandt Community Hall GET OUT Turkey Trot: 9am, Squalicum Creek Park FOOD Harvest Market: 10am-2pm, Carnation Building, Mount Vernon Bellingham Farmers Market: 10am-3pm, Depot Market Square Holiday Farmers Market: 10am-4pm, Port of Anacortes Event Center Cheese Fest: 10am-6pm, Everybody s Store Skagit Wine & Beer Festival: 3-8pm, Eaglemont, Mount Vernon VISUAL Holiday Bazaar: 9am-3pm, Hillcrest Chapel Home for the Holidays: 9:30am-5pm, Ferndale Events Center FishBoy Holiday Show: 2-9pm, FishBoy Gallery SUNDAY [ ] ONSTAGE Peter and the Star Catcher: 2pm, Squalicum High School Fools: 2:30pm, Mount Baker High School Way North Comedy Showcase: 7pm, Farmstrong Brewing, Mount Vernon DANCE Bellingham Rep s Emerge: 5pm, Firehouse Performing Arts Center MUSIC A Musical Thanksgiving: 2pm, McIntyre Hall Whatcom Symphony Orchestra: 3pm, Mount Baker Theatre Ruthie Dornfeld, John Miller: 7pm, YWCA Ballroom FILM Sound of Music Singalong: 1pm, Lincoln Theatre, Mount Vernon FOOD Holiday Farmers Market: 10am-4pm, Port of Anacortes Event Center Cheese Fest: 10am-6pm, Everybody s Store

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4 THISWEEK CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 4 According to the powders that be at the Mt. Baker Ski Area, it s time to take a snow day. At press time, the white stuff was falling fast and a Thurs., Nov. 16 opening day had been announced. All three lodges will be open for business, and six chairlifts will be operating. See you on the mountain! Views & News 04: Mailbag 06: Gristle & Views 08: Watershed watch 10: Last week s news 11: Police blotter, Index Arts & Life 12: Murder most foul 14: Storm warning 15: Alps alert 16: Creative gifting 18: Unseasonal sounds 20: Clubs 22: Art imitates art 23: Film Shorts Rear End 24: Bulletin Board, Free Will 25: Wellness 26: Crossword 27: Advice Goddess 28: Comix 29: Slowpoke, Sudoku 30: Camber 2017 CASCADIA WEEKLY (ISSN ) is published each Wednesday by Cascadia Newspaper Company LLC. Direct all correspondence to: Cascadia Weekly PO Box 2833 Bellingham WA Phone/Fax: Though Cascadia Weekly is distributed free, please take just one copy. Cascadia Weekly may be distributed only by authorized distributors. Any person removing papers in bulk from our distribution points risks prosecution SUBMISSIONS: Cascadia Weekly welcomes freelance submissions. Send material to either the News Editor or A&E Editor. Manuscripts will be returned if you include a stamped, self-addressed envelope. To be considered for calendar listings, notice of events must be received in writing no later than noon Wednesday the week prior to publication. Photographs should be clearly labeled and will be returned if accompanied by stamped, self-addressed envelope. LETTERS POLICY: Cascadia Weekly reserves the right to edit letters for length and content. When apprised of them, we correct errors of fact promptly and courteously. In the interests of fostering dialog and a community forum, Cascadia Weekly does not publish letters that personally disparage other letter writers. Please keep your letters to fewer than 300 words. NEWSPAPER ADVISORY GROUP: Robert Hall, Seth Murphy, Michael Petryni, David Syre Contact Cascadia Weekly: Editorial Editor & Publisher: Tim Johnson ext 260 cascadiaweekly.com Arts & Entertainment Editor: Amy Kepferle ext 204 cascadiaweekly.com Music & Film Editor: Carey Ross ext 203 cascadiaweekly.com Production Art Director: Jesse Kinsman kinsmancreative.com Design: Bill Kamphausen Advertising Design: Roman Komarov cascadiaweekly.com Send all advertising materials to Advertising Sales Manager: Stephanie Young cascadiaweekly.com Distribution Distribution Manager: Erik Burge cascadiaweekly.com Whatcom: Erik Burge, Stephanie Simms Skagit: Linda Brown, Barb Murdoch Letters SEND LETTERS TO CASCADIAWEEKLY.COM COVER: Pianist and vocalist Michael Kaeshammer will perform a Sat., Nov. 18 concert at Mount Baker Theatre. FREED FROM JAIL A hardy thank you to everyone who stood tall in opposition to the now-defunct jail tax Proposition You did not stand down, it was not a done deal, the ship had not sailed, the train is still in the station and it was not a waste of our time. The voters said no, with an even greater margin again! I like to give credit where credit is due, so this is also an acknowledgement of Mayor Jon Mutchler, who voted to run the jail tax on the 2017 ballot. Without Mutchler s disparaging comments about seven council members who did not follow the leader, I would not have known to acknowledge their bold actions. Last week, we journeyed to three local government councils to acknowledge the seven council members. In Ferndale, we acknowledged Cathy Watson and Teresa Taylor. In Bellingham, April Barker and Dan Hammill. In Whatcom County, Ken Mann, Barry Buchanan, and Todd Donovan. The Lummi Nation is also doing great work in keeping their citizens out of the jail with new programs and policies. Lynden Mayor Scott Korthuis indicated he did not know who Vera Institute of Justice is and had not read their report to Whatcom County about how we can reduce our jail population by at least 30 percent. If other council members had bothered to read mail TOC LETTERS STAFF this report they may have voted differently. The Vera report totally validated the work of Restorative CommUnity Coalition. In 2015, our president, Joy Gilfilen, ran for Whatcom County Executive and was the only candidate who openly opposed the jail tax educating the public, creating enough doubt for voters to turn it down. Our County Council formed the Incarceration Prevention & Reduction Task Force and soon after hired the Vera Institute, renowned researcher, to investigate our justice system, which produced a scathing condemnation of our policies and procedures. Unlike Mayor Korthuis, go educate yourself. Don t play blind man s bluff and be led down a dark hole of disaster for our county. If their jail plan were implemented, over time it would bankrupt this county. If you want to know how we can reduce the jail population, which I believe has been kept artificially overcrowded, see Bellingham s report on their new practices and savings to their city. Irene Morgan, Restorative CommUnity Coalition GAMBLING FOR THE THRILL OF THE KILL A month later, the authorities, despite great efforts, have been unable to unearth a motive for the horrendous slaughter in Las Vegas. Investigators may still discover an explanation that provides some acceptable narrative for

5 that onslaught. It might be comforting to discover the killer was an ISIS agent or an atheist out to slay Christian country music fans or a gambler avenging his losses. We would then know whom to hate. The shooter seems not to have been on a suicide mission. He only shot himself to avoid apprehension. It seems he hoped to escape and continue his assault at yet another site. So, why did he undertake to kill so many people he did not know? The reason for that deadly rampage may be far more frightening. The answer may lie right before our eyes. Consider: An individual, having gone to extraordinary lengths and untold expense to acquire an arsenal of deadly assault weapons, may have long fantasized about using them to carry out an historic event, either heroic or heinous. What if Stephen Paddock had simply wanted to experience the thrill of the kill? On a hitherto unheard of scale? We know one other fact about the shooter: He was an avid gambler. Maybe he was setting up the ultimate highstakes bet. Could he massacre vast numbers in his extended sniper attack and get away with it? That is not an unprecedented phenomenon. In 1924, in the Crime of the Century, a case that riveted the attention of the whole country, Nathan Leopold, Jr. and Richard Loeb, two wealthy college students in Chicago, killed 14-yearold Bobby Frank just for the thrill of it. Their admitted objective was to prove their intellectual superiority by having committed the perfect crime. Since that time there have been periodic killings done by individuals who afterward explained they had wanted to experience what it felt like to kill. Several recent murders of homeless individuals have been so explained. Such bloodlust, deliberately targeting random, innocent victims is especially difficult to contemplate. There is no way to protect oneself from such attacks. When mass killings are associated with some political agenda, we immediately label them terrorist attacks. Without such association, they still evoke unmitigated terror among us. Perhaps we should describe events like the Las Vegas mayhem as terrorism for the thrill of it attacks. Tom Goetzl, Bellingham SEND US YOUR LETTERS Make them 300 words or fewer. Send to or mail to P.O. Box 2833, Bellingham, WA DEC 2, 3 pm & 7:30 pm First Congregational Church 2401 Cornwall Avenue, Bellingham TICKETS: $ 5 - $ PEP PER SIST ERS COOKING OUTSIDE THE BOX SINCE 1988 Open Nightly Except Monday 1055 N State St B ham Nothing has changed at Rainbow Auto. Same friendly professional service for 31 years. $53 00 $81 50 CIGARETTES AND SMOKELESS TOBACCO TO Per Carton Includes Tax! ALL MAJOR BRANDS & GENERICS CASINO RESORT On I-5 Exit 236 theskagit.com EXPRESS DRIVE-THRU OPEN 7AM-9PM 7 DAYS A WEEK *Price at time of printing. Limit five cartons/rolls per customer per day. Must have valid ID. Cigarettes are not legal for resale. Prices subject to change. No Returns. The Skagit Casino Resort and U.S.I.T. Tobacco Shop owned by Upper Skagit Indian Tribe. SURGEON GENERAL S WARNING: Quitting Smoking Now Greatly Reduces Serious Risks to Your Health. CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 5

6 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 6 THE GRISTLE NAPKIN PLAN: While late ballots were flooding in countywide on Election Day, outgoing Port of Bellingham Commissioner Michael McAuley used one of his last opportunities to cast a different kind of vote a vote of no confidence in a flawed process that has produced a startlingly different vision for Bellingham s central waterfront than the vision promised. This isn t even close to what we ve been showing the public, McAuley noted at the regular meeting of the commission. I m not necessarily upset there is a new plan, but there is no way, he said, that I m going to advocate for this plan. The waterfront master development agreement was approved in 2013 by the port commission and Bellingham City Council after extensive public review. It was understood the 2013 plan could change when the master developer arrived. Harcourt Developments, the Irish development firm, issued their plan modifications in McAuley explained that for more than a year the public had been shown a plan that calls for green space along the edge of Whatcom Waterway coupled with a serpentine park through the center of the waterfront site that would create connectivity through the downtown to parks and trails to the south. The commission advocated for this earlier plan. We have shown the earlier design with the serpentine park at almost every meeting for about a year, McAuley said. Then, with zero public input nobody knows who was in the room when this new design was proposed, I don t know who was in the room came this new plan. My initial response was this is a very interesting concept, and I think I was polite when I saw this, but upon reflection I actually started to get a little bit angry, he admitted. We had a developer that had agreed to something in In one work day, it was completely erased and replaced with something we ve never seen before. Years late on completion of the Granary, late on the submission of a design for a second building in the waterfront district sub-area, Harcourt last year brushed all that aside with a proposal to begin work on an elaborate hotel and conference center. A year later, Harcourt returned with another plan to build student housing and an assisted living project. Each housing project, based on the sophomoric site sketches submitted by Harcourt last month, would be the size of a stadium each building larger in scale than the entire Fairhaven urban center. In early 2017, the cash-strapped Irish developer refinanced nearly $100 million in bank loans with companies involved in the development of its Belfast Titanic Quarter redevelopment. A quick sale of the Bellingham waterfront to the developer of lucrative specialized housing for students and the elderly could yield Harcourt additional working capital. This alternative plan was driven by large niche market corporations D2 Architects, developers of assisted living complexes, and Valeo, developers of student housing. Under the proposal, Harcourt which by contract can purchase the property at submarket rates could flip parcels to these firms for easy cash flow. This may assist a financially stressed Harcourt but it appears to abandon much of what was desirable in the vision originally presented to the public. The projects do not roar economic development or living-wage job creation, McAuley complained. BY SEN. KEVIN RANKER LAST WEEK, with the election of Manka Dhingra, Democrats gained control of the Washington State Senate and we finished building the Blue Wall between California, Oregon, and Washington. Today, we begin implementing an agenda that truly represents our core values. We will now block Trump along the entire West Coast. We will not only protect the rights of all people LGBTQ, immigrants, women, children, the poor but we will also support them. We will develop and pass policies that support mental health, homeless, education (both higher and K-12) and the environment. Today is an incredible day one I have dreamed of for five years, but was overwhelmed by since the election last November. This incredible accomplishment happened because thousands of you did more than you have ever done in so very many ways. You are incredible. I am so very proud to get to represent so many wonderful, special, caring people. I sincerely thank you for empowering me to do more! Take some time to reflect upon this remarkable accomplishment. Celebrate and enjoy the people around you. Build your energy and recognize your part in this, whether directly supporting the special election of Manka that flipped the Washington State Senate, or joining the Women s March or another protest or writing postcards, making phone calls or giving money, your part in this Resistance is beginning to make very real and powerful progress. It is very important to recognize VIEWS EXPRESSED ARE NOT NECESSARILY THOSE OF CASCADIA WEEKLY views YOUR VIEWS THE GRISTLE Big Blue Wall ELECTION BRINGS NEW, POWERFUL OPPORTUNITIES and celebrate accomplishments take a moment to recognize yours. We must also, however, remember we are not done. We need to build our strength and begin the focus on We must work to build our majorities in the state Legislature and we must focus on Congress. We must take our country back and ensure that all of our leaders are motivated by kindness and love. That our laws protect and celebrate diversity, community and raise each of us to have healthy and happy lives. On the eve of this election, I found myself reflecting upon the conversation I had with Stella, the incredibly brave trans girl who inspired much of my Hope and Action talk I gave early this year around the state about what we can do to make a difference. She left me with something I shared during those KEVIN RANKER LIVENS UP TO THE CROWD talks that is even more powerful and appropriate today. If you see anything on Facebook or Twitter that advocates for anything that you support, she wrote, do it. Show up and support that cause. Also any sort of protest, I would say, go do it. Fight for what you know and think is right. And do it not only for the people you know, but do it for yourself. Support business, organizations and people who also believe in the same values. Use your voice. Stand up for others. Most of all be kind, to yourself and others. Most of all, be kind to yourself and others. Let us all be motivated by Stella s words as we advance our agenda in the coming year. Kevin Ranker is the senate representative of the 40th Legislative District.

7 OF FUN AT NORTHWOOD! The first 200 Winners Club Members starting at 6pm get a free Northwood 10th Anniversary T-shirt. WIN FROM 2X TO 10X POINTS NOVEMBER 21! FOOD 30 B-BOARD 24 FILM 2 2 MUSIC 18 ART 16 # DO IT 2 Winners Club Members pick an envelope before playing, and win from 2X to 10X Reward Points on all their play, the rest of the day! STAGE 15 COME CELEBRATE GET OUT 14 GET A FREE 10TH ANNIVERSARY T-SHIRT ON NOVEMBER 20! WORDS 12 NORTHWOOD! CURRENTS 8 EVERY DAY AT VIEWS VIEWS 6 PLAY A BETTER WAY TO JUST TWO TURNS OFF THE GUIDE MERIDIAN MODERN COMFORTS AND OLD FASHIONED HOSPITALITY 99 ALDERGROVE 15 BRITISH COLUMBIA, CANADA 8 AVE BLAINE 9750 Northwood Road Lynden WA N DRAYTON HARBOR GUIDE MERIDIAN RD BIRCH BAY 5 E BADGER RD LYNDEN NORTHWOOD RD CASCADIA WEEKLY And they do not roar anything residents might expect in a revitalized urban center, and it all comes at the cost of the loss of connectivity which is a vital part of the waterfront the community was promised. This new design is not even close to what the public asked us to provide, McAuley commented. What I see instead of a park is a plaza in front of a six-story assisted living complex which doesn t provide a lot of new jobs, and the ones that typically are created are not the sort of highpaying jobs that the public has asked the port to pursue, McAuley observed. Commissioner Bobby Briscoe supported McAuley s concerns, and Port Executive Director Rob Fix apologized for the cartoony appearance of the recent site sketches. Yet Director Fix had earlier admitted he d seen plans such as these weeks before they were shown to the commission. Which is it, a careful and incremental plan months in the making? Or something crudely sketched on a paper cocktail napkin a few hours before it was enthusiastically cheered by port and city planners? Look: The entire purpose of seeking a global master developer was to take advantage of private working capital for expedited world-class outcomes. It appears we may have instead a distressed developer who seeks to milk the Bellingham waterfront as a cash cow for other projects. Why support this? In the days following the election, Michael Shepard moved ahead of incumbent Commissioner Dan Robbins in late returns. Shepard has continued to increase his lead in successive counts as ballots poured in from Bellingham districts. Shepard was unique among the candidates for suggesting that the very remoteness of the developer, their lack of an office or a representative agent in Bellingham, their lack of connectedness to the community, could be issues moving forward. He was clear that the community needs to continue to control the vision for waterfront redevelopment. Together with Ken Bell s win in the District 2 position, a change-up creates an almost entirely new commission, with not a single member responsible for the misguided, inverted plan for Bellingham s central waterfront. With the arrival of two new commissioners perhaps comes a more circumspect approach to that plan. Let s hope new brains and renewed diligence will continue to echo McAuley s concerns. MAIL 4 THE GRISTLE 7

8 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 8 PHOTO COURTESY OF PUGET SOUND KEEPERS currents NEWS POLITICS FUZZ BUZZ INDEX State of the Sound PROGRESS IN WHATCOM COUNTY, BUT POOR MARKS FOR THE SALISH SEA BY TIM JOHNSON As the number of endangered Southern Resident orca whales continues to decline and Puget Sound Chinook salmon remain threatened, officials say the need to save the two species is becoming dire. A leading theory is the whales are starving because they cannot find enough Chinook salmon, the endangered fish that the resident orcas eat almost exclusively. Concerns are increasing that the iconic whales are on a path to extinction. The leadership council for the state s Puget Sound Partnership passed a resolution last week recognizing the connection between the fish and whales, and committed to accelerating the recovery of both species. The Puget Sound Partnership is the state agency leading the region's collective effort to restore and protect the Salish Sea. The Partnership also released last week a 2017 State of the Sound report that for the first time acknowledges that the goals the state Legislature laid out when it formed the partnership 10 years ago will not be met by the target of The seven-member council includes representatives from throughout the Puget Sound region and is the governing body of the state agency. The report calls for expedited action to continue working toward a healthy Puget Sound beyond Policymakers thought they were being realistic but tough when they set the recovery target goal when the former director of the state Dept. of Ecology, Christine Gregoire, was governor. Now that goal looks to be unrealistic, even naive. Puget Sound Partnership Leadership Council Chair Jay Manning told the Skagit Valley Herald he believes the expertise of local organizations will be key in moving salmon and orca recovery forward, and in achieving the larger goals of Puget Sound recovery. Manning was the director of Ecology during Gregoire s administration. I think that question is going to be asked: What can and should be done locally? Manning said. I m very eager to have that conversation with the local folks. They know the watershed best, and I know they care about Chinook and orca recovery. The report urges Puget Sound residents to support state and local efforts as they go about the extraordinarily difficult task of preventing projects and activities that will harm the Sound. Recovering a large, complex estuarine system is a complicated business, leadership council authors acknowledge in their report. We have done many good things, but the system has not yet responded positively. LOCAL SUCCESSES As one of the organizations working to prevent pollution from harming the Sound, RE Sources agrees with the report s fundamental message. Restoration alone isn t enough, said RE Sources clean water program manager Ann Russell. The need to identify and stop sources of pollution are critical, and will become even more important as our region continues to grow. The report notes that an estimated 1,000 people every week are moving into the Puget Sound basin. At the same time, RE Sources was heartened that the report called out several projects in Whatcom County that have made a positive difference. The report specifically cites the reopening of shellfish beds in Drayton Harbor and efforts to

9 use natural infrastructure to filter polluted stormwater runoff entering Lake Whatcom, Bellingham s drinking water source. RE Sources played a role in these successful projects. For decades, Drayton Harbor provided ideal growing conditions for shellfish and created jobs for many in the local community. But by 1995, much of Drayton Harbor was classified as prohibited for shellfish harvesting because fecal bacteria from livestock, on-site sewage systems, boats and marinas, and the local sanitary sewer system were contaminating the shellfish beds. After 25 years of community-led hard work and dedication, 810 acres of shellfish beds in Drayton Harbor were reclassified as approved for shellfish harvest. Harvests resumed for the first time in 22 years. For Lake Whatcom, three projects noted in the report reduced the pollution carried by stormwater runoff. we know from experience that when the people of Whatcom County work together to stop pollution, we get results. ANN RUSSELL, RE SOURCES CLEAN WATER PROGRAM MANAGER These projects restored a stream channel to naturally filter out pollution and involved building swales, stormwater vaults, and rain gardens to slow the water and remove pollution. Stormwater runoff was treated for 150 acres. This was a joint stormwater retrofit program between Whatcom County and the City of Bellingham and was funded in part by an Ecology stormwater financial assistance grant. RE Sources clean water program championed these efforts. It s a tough challenge, Russell said. And we know from experience that when the people of Whatcom County work together to stop pollution, we get results that everyone who cares about the Salish Sea can own and be proud of. GLOBAL CONCERNS In 2007, the state legislature found that the degradation of and risk to the Puget Sound ecosystem warranted the formation of an entity focused on restoring and protecting the Sound. The formative statute of the Puget Sound Partnership notes that it is the goal of the state that the health of Puget Sound be restored by Ten years after the statute was enacted, the region has succeeded in forming regional and subregional plans and management systems to make recovery happen. Thousands of projects have been successfully completed and more are underway. Unfortunately, our collective efforts have been insufficient, Leadership council authors admit. While we are making important progress in some areas, many key indicators of ecosystem health are not showing improvement. Worse yet, some key indicators, such as resident orca and Chinook salmon populations, remain in a perilous state. Despite the efforts of so many, it is time to admit that we will not recover Puget Sound to good health by 2020 the goal that was set 10 years ago when the Partnership was created. This is obviously disappointing, the authors note, and we need to examine our program to identify needed improvements. We must be willing to conduct an honest, clear-eyed review of where we are and where we are headed. Course corrections must be identified and implemented soon to get Puget Sound on an acceptable recovery trajectory. Of nearly two dozen metrics that gauge the health of Puget Sound, only three are on or near their 2020 targets, according to the report. These noted successes include slowing the rate of forest loss to development and shoreline management to discourage the erosion of bluffs. Areas of alarming declines include chinook salmon and herring populations, and the impacts on food web to dependent indicator species like orcas. As of September 2017, the Southern Resident killer whale population has only 76 individuals; recovery depends on increasing its main prey, chinook salmon; reducing the load of toxins entering Puget Sound; and minimizing the impacts and risks of vessel traffic. Pacific herring, small schooling fish that are important prey for salmon and other species, continue to show signs of decline. Marine scientists suspect the rate of decline in orca population exceeds the slow improvements to the Puget Sound ecosystem, making the extinction of Southern Residents inevitable without improved action. If we lose Southern Resident orcas, we will have failed in our job, Todd Hass, a conservation biologist who serves on the Partnerhsip s leadership council, stated. We need to bring the orcas back to stable numbers and to do that we need to bring Chinook salmon back to stable numbers. The leadership council resolution recognizes the connection between the fish and whales, and committed to accelerating the recovery of both iconic species. HUNDRED NORTH GENUINE SEASONAL CUISINE Menu featuring ALL ORGANIC PRODUCE from small local farms Extensive wine list Craft cocktails Wild sustainable fish Weekend brunch Tuesday 20% INDUSTRY DISCOUNT Wednesday (360) N. Commercial Street Reservations HundredNorth.com $20 POT ROAST & PINT An Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM) from Industrial CU offers these great benefits: *APR = Annual Percentage Rate. Subject to credit approval. Maximum total loan-to-value (LTV) = 80%. Rate dependent on borrower s credit score. No prepayment penalty. Rate valid only for 15/1 Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM). Rate subject to change without notice. For example: On a $350,000 mortgage at 3.52% APR and 35-year term, the principal & interest payment = $1, per month. CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 9

10 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD MONDAY More than 170 women including lobbyists and lawmakers have signed a letter calling for a culture change at the state Capitol when it comes to dealing with sexual harassment. Their letter follows a turbulent week in Olympia where two former lawmakers faced accusations of sexual misconduct, and a host of women at the Capitol said they often experience sexist or inappropriate behavior, ranging from unwanted comments and touching to groping or harassment. Often, the women said, they believe the current structure for reporting issues is inadequate, prompting legislators and others to call for change. The letter was delivered to legislative leadership. [NPR] TUESDAY LAST WEEK S NEWS NOV06-14 BY TIM JOHNSON as The collapse of an Atlantic salmon net pen in August wasn t the first trouble the facility had. A report to state regulators says the collapse of the net pen off Cypress Island last August was preceded by a serious breakdown less than a month earlier in which nearly half of its anchor lines snapped. The Seattle Times reports the owner of the net pen, Cooke Aquaculture, has filed a chronology of the collapse that spewed more than 160,000 adult Atlantic salmon into Puget Sound. More than 100,000 of those fish are still unaccounted for. [Associated Press] The Wild Fish Conservancy files a citizen suit against Cooke Aquaculture with the goal of holding the company responsible for the negligent release of farmed Atlantic salmon into public waters. The escape event off of Cypress Island violated the federal Clean Water Act, the suit alleges, posing a dire threat to already imperiled wild fish populations, beloved marine mammal species, and the fragile Puget Sound ecosystem. [WFC] Lily Elkjaer Giesecke LMP License # W. Holly St, Suite G-2 Bellingham, WA First massage is Specializing in Deep Tissue, Neuromuscular Massage, Trigger Point Therapy & Ashiatsu Deep Feet Therapy Half price specials all month long! evergreenbellingham.com WThe Week that PHOTO COURTESY OF THE CITY OF BELLINGHAM The City of Bellingham hosted a groundbreaking ceremony for the newest road and park projects on the central waterfront this week. Work is underway on the Granary Avenue and Laurel Street project, which will include new public and franchise utilities, bicycle and pedestrian facilities, parking, landscaping and street lighting, as well as street access to the waterfront. "We are very excited that these projects are moving forward to provide much needed public access to our waterfront," Mayor Kelli Linville said THURSDAY A Bellingham man is sentenced to more than 10 years in prison for beating his roommate to death. Travis Marshall and David Williams were drinking together one night last March when they began arguing. The Bellingham Herald reported Marshall severely beat Williams and left him to die. [Bellingham Herald] MONDAY The Trump administration makes its debut at a United Nations conference on climate change by giving a full-throated defense of fossil fuels and nuclear energy as answers to driving down global greenhouse gas emissions. The forum the only official appearance by the United States delegation during the annual two-week climate gathering of nearly 200 nations illustrated how sharply the administration s views are at odds with those of many key participants in the climate negotiations. Audience members shouted down and mocked White House officials who attempted to explain away President Trump s stated view that global warming is a hoax. [NYT] 601 WEST HOLLY ST BELLINGHAM Posole November Soup Bock on Tap & in Bottles! NORTHWEST PASSAGES The Lummi Nation elected Jay Julius as the new chairman and welcomed new council members. New members include Cheryl Sanders, Celina Phair, and Freddy Lane. The Lummi general election was held Nov. 4. Gov. Jay Inslee and other members of the U.S. Climate Alliance joined with leaders from Mexico and Canada to create the North American Climate Leadership Dialogue today in Bonn, Germany. The U.S. Climate Alliance, a bipartisan coalition of 15 U.S. Governors, stand together in a strong commitment to combat climate change and support clean growth across North America. This is the first instance of the Alliance working directly with other national governments on climate. [Office of Governor] TUESDAY Search continues for two snowboarders from Bellingham missing near the Mt. Baker Ski Area since Sunday. Searchers looked for the men in very hazardous weather and avalanche conditions and were assessing whether it would be safe enough to continue the search on Tuesday. [KGMI] HIGGINS AIRPORT WY BURLINGTON Kaffee Dunkel Lager on Tap! Taking Reservations for Holiday Parties!

11 FUZZ BUZZ HAT TRICK On Nov. 3, a man had his hat stolen in a strong-arm robbery near Western Washington University campus. Bellingham Police later arrested a 21-year-old on charges of first-degree robbery, felony harassment and third-degree malicious mischief. Police reported the victim had been walking on High Street near Laurel Park when he was sucker punched and assaulted. His hat was stolen. The hat was valued at $25. The Bellingham Herald reported the 21-year-old faces up to 12 years in prison for the assault and theft. MAIL FAIL On Nov. 11, a Mount Vernon woman plead guilty to 18 felonies for identity theft. Police said they found several garbage bags containing opened and unopened mail addressed to others, documents state. Police also found counterfeit checks, driver s licenses and Social Security cards in her home. The Skagit Valley Herald reported a postal inspector believed Ryann Garner had taken roughly 300 pieces of mail addressed to 275 people at about 190 different residences. CAMPUS CREEP, CTD. On Nov. 9, a woman in Sunnyland neighborhood observed a man looking through her living room window. Bellingham Police are uncertain if the incident is linked to a rash of voyeurism, prowling and lewd conduct near Western Washington University and surrounding neighborhoods. About two dozen similar incidents have been reported this year. NEW CAR MARRED On Nov. 6, an eager teen was being shown the family s new car when it was inadvertently put into drive and shot through the neighbor s fence. No one was injured, Bellingham Police reported. DOOBIE DON T BE On Nov. 2, an off-duty patrol officer observed a man yelling and smoking what appeared to be marijuana behind the old Blaine city hall. An officer arrived and spoke to the man, who was still actively smoking marijuana next to the police department parking lot. The man was issued a civil infraction for the offense. JUST SAYING HELLO On Nov. 5, a 54-year-old man head-butted another man in downtown Bellingham, knocking a tooth loose. On Nov. 5, a man reported damage to his car after two miscreants threw icy snowballs at it, scratching the paint. On Nov. 1, a woman in Bellingham s Lettered Streets neighborhood arrived home to find her front door kicked in. Nothing had been taken from the home. On Oct. 29, a man set some papers on fire and shoved them through the mail slot of the Swillery on Holly Street in downtown Bellingham. The Swillery is undergoing renovations. On Nov. 10, a homeless man was reported yelling at Bellingham Police. SOUR MILK On Nov. 12, a mother told Bellingham Police someone had poured sour milk on her baby stroller. RED RIDING HOOD On Nov. 11, a Bellingham woman told another person she was going to kill her grandmother. PEOPLE WITH ISSUES On Oct. 23, a woman called Blaine Police department to report a man in the roadway who was yelling and causing a ruckus. Police spoke to the man, who is known to police to have mental health issues, and explained that he needed to calm down. The man apologized and stated he understood before hopping on the bus and embarking to Bellingham. On Nov. 9, Bellingham Police checked on a man reported to have been punching himself in the face and yelling nonsensically. POOCH PATROL On Nov. 5, Blaine Police assisted a pooch in a sticky situation. The fella was involved in a high-speed pursuit of another critter, which ended abruptly when the chasee escaped under a porch and the chaser got stuck, police reported. Officers assisted with the digging out of the doggie. No animals appeared to be seriously injured during the event. On Oct. 24, a woman called to report that a husky and lab were running around near Peace Portal and Bell Road in Blaine. A helpful citizen was able to contain the duo and locate the owner before police arrived. On Oct. 9, a Blaine resident called the police to report a hound showed up on his property and he does not know who the owner is. An officer took custody of the animal and determined owner information through its embedded chip. An attempt will be made to contact the owner, police reported. index 58.6 Percent by which Whatcom County Proposition , concerning the construction of a new jail, failed countywide in final returns Percent by which Whatcom County Proposition failed in Bellingham precincts. Several Bellingham precincts logged 86 percent disapproval. Percent by which Whatcom County Proposition passed in Lynden precincts. No Lynden precinct logged more than 67 percent approval. 36 Percent of voter turnout statewide in last week s general election. Whatcom County recorded elevated turnout at 45.5 percent, among the highest in the state Percent of Washington Democrats who say firearms priorities should be to control violence. Percent of Washington Republicans who say gun rights are the paramount concern Percent of Washington Democrats who say racial biases are why people of color have a difficult time getting ahead. Percent of Washington Republicans who say people of color are responsible for their own conditions Percent of Washington Democrats who blame poverty on economic circumstances. Percent of Washington Republicans who say poverty is due to a lack of effort by the poor. SOURCES: National Highway Safety Administration (NHSA); State Farm Insurance; Washington Dept.of Fish and Wildlife; City of Bellingham CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 11

12 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD REVIEWED BY CHRISTINE PERKINS Magpie Murders A MYSTERY WITHIN A MYSTERY words COMMUNITY LECTURES BOOKS ANTHONY HOROWITZ NOW THAT there s been snow in the lowlands of Whatcom County and the sun sets before 5pm, it s time to flip on the gas fireplace and cozy up with a stack of mysteries from the library. Anthony Horowitz s latest thriller is just the thing to take your mind off the weather and distressing news headlines. The tale begins in the London flat of Susan Ryeland, longtime editor of the Atticus Pund detective novels. She s just received the manuscript of Magpie Murders, Alan Conway s latest, and though she s never cared for the difficult author, she s always been a fan of his books. But she begins with a warning: This book cost her her job, many friends, even her home. Reader, beware! Magpie Murders is a book within a book, and it works on both levels. First, you get the manuscript, in its entirety, which follows Atticus Pund s investigation of the murder of Mary Blakiston. Mary, a cranky village busybody, was found dead at the foot of the stairs of Pye Hall, the local manor house. In typical whodunit fashion, we meet a cast of suspects, each with their motive for wanting Mary dead. There s Blakiston s son Robert, who loudly argued with his mother just days before her demise. Or Dr. Emilia Redwing, who discovered the body. And don t overlook the Reverend Robin Osborne and his wife Henrietta, who were on holiday when Mary Blakiston died but have mysterious latenight doings in the woods of the Dingle Dell. It s not until a second murder occurs in sleepy Saxby-on-Avon that Pund takes the case in earnest. Despite a recent terminal diagnosis of his own, Pund agrees to help his colleague Inspector Chubb investigate the death of Sir Magnus Pye, beheaded with a sword from an antique suit of armor. If this seems like familiar territory, it is. GET IT HOW: The options for enjoying Magpie Murders are plentiful: it s available from the Whatcom County Library System and Bellingham Public Library as a book, large print book, audiobook on CD, Playaway, ebook, and downloadable audiobook. Visit to place a hold on a copy, or www. bellinghampublic library.org if you live within the city limits of Bellingham. MORE: Don t miss Horowitz s other novels: The House of Silk and Moriarty (both based on Sherlock Holmes), as well as the TV series Midsomer Murders and Foyle s War. All can be found at your library. Author Alan Conway (and by extension, Anthony Horowitz) clearly draws from the tradition of Dame Agatha Christie, less the racial slurs and antisemitism that marred Christie s beloved bestsellers. There are red herrings, British manners, and even recurring nursery rhyme themes to move the plot along. But Magpie Murders really gets interesting when Susan Ryeland arrives at the end of the manuscript only to discover the ending is missing. Two days later, Alan Conway is dead. And Susan has a real-life mystery on her hands. Did Alan suspect that someone was out to get him? Did he insert clues into his last manuscript? What happened to the final pages? Horowitz keeps the pacing taut, the clues clever, and the twists surprising. Readers who enjoy playing armchair detective will not be disappointed. Christine Perkins is the Executive Director of the Whatcom County Library System. She s read all 66 Agatha Christie mysteries (available at your library) and looks forward to watching Murder on the Orient Express on the big screen. WORDS WED., NOV. 15 OPEN MIC: Sign up to read your poetry and prose or play music or simply listen in at a Creekside Open Mic starting at 6:30pm at Sudden Valley s South Whatcom Library, 10 Barn View Court, Gate 2. Entry to the monthly event is free. (360) HISTORY ON TRIAL: Holocaust historian and author Deborah Lipstadt will present History on Trial: My Day in Court with David Irving at 7:30pm at Western Washington University s Performing Arts Center Mainstage. She will recount the story of her libel trial in London against right-wing extremist David Irving, the basis of her 2005 book of the same name. Lipstadt had called Irving a Holocaust denier, and by the end of the five-year trial, the judge found on Lipstadt s behalf and labeled him not only a denier but a racist, a falsifier of history, and an anti-semite. Entry is free and open to the public; tickets are required. THURS., NOV. 16 A SPLINTERED STEP: Marian Exall will read from her latest Sarah McKinney mystery, A Splintered Step, at 7pm at Village Books, th St. In the book, Sarah s plan for a cozy vacation with her lover turns toward terror when she travels to London for the holidays, and becomes embroiled in the search for a link connecting apparently random deaths. FRI., NOV. 17 BOOKS AND BITES: Bring your lunch if you d like and join the lively conversation about Kazuo Ishiguro s Never Let Me Go at a Books and Bites meeting from 1-2:30pm at the Blaine Library, 610 3rd St. (360) FAMILY STORY NIGHT: Bellingham Storyteller s Guild members will lead an hour of coaching and an introduction to the craft at 6pm at the Fairhaven Library, th St. At 7pm, Family Story Night will commence. Entry to both events is free. WRITERS ON THE FLY: Readings from Cameron K. Scott, James Hepworth, Nathaniel Riverhorse Nakadate, Steve Duda, and Amanda Monthe will be part of a Writers on the Fly tour stop at 7pm at the Mountain Room at Boundary Bay Brewery, 1107 Railroad Ave. In addition to enjoying an evening of fly-fishingfocused literature and art, the event will also include beer, raffles and shenanigans for all. Tickets are $10. NOV USED BOOK SALE: Find something for everyone at a Used Book Sale taking place from 10am-5pm Friday and Saturday behind People Bank across from the Everson Library, 104 Kirsch Dr. Proceeds benefit the Friends of the Everson Library. (360) doit SAT., NOV. 18 LYNDEN BOOK CLUB: Discuss Madeleine Thien s Do Not Say We Have Nothing: A Novel at an Award-Winning Book Club meeting taking place from 10:30am-12pm at the Everson

13 doit Acclaimed author Tom Robbins will be joined by Washington State Poet Laureate Tod Marshall and others to read from their works in the WA 129 poetry collection at a free event taking place Sat., Nov. 18 at La Conner s Maple Hall Library, 216 4th St. Even if you didn t finish the book, feel free to attend. (360) WRITER S BLOCK: Attend a Conquering Writer s Block workshop from 2-4pm at Sudden Valley s South Whatcom Library, 10 Barn View Court. At the hands-on event, Kent Sisco will demonstrate the free software tool Speare, which can assist writers with the three big decisions they face what to say, how to say it and in what order. Attendees should bring a smartphone, tablet or laptop. (360) INDIE PUBLISHING: Local author Susan Colleen Browne will chat about the independent publishing process and how to get started as an indie author at a NaNoWriMo and Indie Publishing presentation from 3-4:30pm at the Everson Library, 104 Kirsch Dr. Having produced two published books from NaNoWriMo drafts, she ll also share tips about preparing for NaNoWriMo and ways to persevere with your story. (360) WA 129 POETRY READING: Washington State Poet Laureate Tod Marshall, acclaimed author Tom Robbins, and others will share their works from WA 129 at a free poetry reading at 6pm in La Conner at Maple Hall, 104 Commercial St. The book is a collection of works by poets from around the state and includes amateur poets alongside writers such as Sherman Alexie and Robbins. The anthology features one poem for every year of Washington statehood (hence 129 ). WELCOME HOME: Cake, stories and more will be part of a Welcome Home Celebration for Village Books cofounder Chuck Robinson at 7pm in the Readings Gallery at the Fairhaven bookstore at th St. Robinson recently returned for a mammoth cross-country fundraising bike adventure. SUN., NOV. 19 THE 25TH HOUR: Dr. Karen McLean Dade shares ideas from Christopher Donaldson, Jr. s The 25th Hour at 4pm at Village Books, th St. With one out of 100 people incarcerated in the United States, it is likely that many of us on the outside are connected in some way to those imprisoned. The 25th Hour builds on that connectedness in sharing the poetry of a young incarcerated black male who beckons readers of his poetry to recognize the human connection between us all thus the need for those on the outside to work for greater justice for those on the inside. MON., NOV. 20 POETRYNIGHT: Those looking to share their creative verse as part of Poetrynight can sign up at 7:45pm at the Bellingham Public Library, 210 Central Ave. Readings start at 8pm. Entry is by donation. TUES., NOV. 21 BOOKS ON TAP: Deming Library staff Erin Suda and Katrina Carabba will helm a Books on Tap discussion from 7-8:30pm at the North Fork Brewery, 6185 Mt. Baker Hwy. This month s read is I Am Malala by Malala Yousafzai. (360) COMMUNITY WED., NOV. 15 BELLINGHAM AT HOME: Learn more about Bellingham at Home at an informational meeting from 1-3pm at the Bellingham Senior Activity Center, 315 Halleck St. Membership and volunteering will also be discussed. (360) HOUSING DOC: Attend a Don t Ballardize Bellingham presentation at 7pm at the Garden Street Methodist Church, 1326 N. Garden St. Attendees at the free event can view a 40-minute documentary Donate items such sleeping bags, blankets, hats, gloves, tents, hand warmers, tarps, socks and more for a Homeless Summit and Cold Weather Giveaway taking place Sat., Nov. 18 at Maritime Heritage Park detailing how the Ballard neighborhood in Seattle has been bulldozed and overbuilt. A discussion will follow. Please RSPVP if you plan on showing up. SAT., NOV. 18 CLIMATE REALITY: Join the League of Women Voters for a Climate Reality: Hope Through Action event from 10am-12pm at the downstairs lecture room at the Bellingham Public Library, 210 Central Ave. Two award-winning speakers and graduates of Al Gore s Climate Reality training will include portions of Gore s presentation and help participants develop their own action plan to effect change for the environment. SOUTH FORK WINTERFEST: Live music by Mockingbird, arts and crafts, unique holiday gifts, refreshments and more will be part of the South Fork Winterfest taking place from 10am-4pm at Deming s Van Zandt Community Hall, 4105 Valley Hwy. Admission to the all-ages event is free; donations are welcome. HOMELESS SUMMIT: Attend a Homeless Summit and Cold Weather Giveaway being hosted by HomesNOW! Not Later from 3-5pm at Maritime Heritage Park, 500 W. Holly St. MON., NOV. 20 ROCKS AND GEMS: Join the monthly meeting of the Mt. Baker Rock & Gem Club at 7pm at the Bloedel Donovan Community Building, 2214 Electric Ave. A rock-focused show-and-tell, a silent auction, door prizes, refreshments and a short business meeting will be part of the night s events. EBT 60 Rare & Delectable Cheeses Local Berry & Fireweed Honey Alpaca & Yak Wool Blankets Local Organic Ground Lamb EBS Grown Leeks, Kale, Apples Sausages, Sandwiches, Wine Licorice, Chocolate, Spicy Jam Festival Nov. 18 * Great Deals Highway 9 Van Zandt FREE EVENTS at Village Books in Fairhaven Marian Exall A Splintered Step A Sarah McKinney Mystery Thursday, November 16, 7pm Dr. Karen Mclean Dade will present The 25th Hour Poetry by Christopher Donaldson Jr., an incarcerated black male who beckons us to recognize the human connection between us all. Sundday, November 19, 4pm 2 ANNIVERSARY LYNDEN Celebration Join us in welcoming the bestselling author of the international phenomenon THE MARTIAN ANDY WEIR Tickets $5 Games! Prizes! Demos! Cake! at Bellingham High School He ll introduce his latest book, ARTEMIS Don t miss out Sunday, November 19, 11am - 5pm 430 Front St., Downtown Lynden An irresistible new science-fiction thrill ride! Wednesday, November 29, 7pm available at Village Books & brownpapertickets.com Proceeds will benefit Bellingham High School s PTSA. Receive one ticket FREE with each pre-event purchase of ARTEMIS - out Nov. 14th. VILLAGE BOOKS & PAPER DREAMS th St, Bellingham & 430 Front St, Lynden VILLAGEBOOKS.COM CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD Read more at villagebooks.com

14 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD PHOTO BY BERNARD REGIER BY AMY KEPFERLE outside HIKING RUNNING GARDENING Storm Warning BLESSINGS OF A BLOWDOWN WHEN A limb from a century-old tree hits a house, it feels like it s been rammed by a Humvee. I know this because during a gnarly windstorm in mid-october, the stately maple that has been gracing the second lot of my front yard since long before I moved to Bellingham s York neighborhood in the winter of 2000 succumbed to the elements. I was vacuuming the basement when the tree attacked the roof, but I still heard the reverberating boom. As I rushed upstairs, I took note of a jagged branch hanging from the side of the house and the furnace chimney lying in pieces on the ground. I opened the front door just in time to see more limbs breaking free from the trunk. In the blink of an eye, the yard was full of leaves and long lengths of wood as was part of my next-door neighbor s yard, the sidewalk and the street. Phone lines were compromised, the garden gate was obliterated, and an ornamental cherry tree and lilac bush were buried beneath the debris. The destruction was breathtaking, but in the hours and days following the Big Blowdown of 2017 I d come to see that things could ve been much, much worse. In fact, I d eventually feel thankful. Above all, I was thankful that no humans were injured, and that my 117-year-old Victorian wasn t obliterated (although it s going to need some roofing work, among other things). I was also grateful that no vehicles were damaged, our chickens were safe, and we didn t lose power. Among the numerous blessings I m counting as Thanksgiving nears is that the accident brought me closer to the community from the neighbors who called the authorities to report the damage, to those who stopped by to tell me stories about how the iconic tree impacted their lives, to the woodworker who requested a chunk of the maple to craft a bowl for us. When Public Works came to clear the woody debris from the street and sidewalk, two of the knuckles they carted away weighed in at 9,000 pounds. They were likely so heavy because they were waterlogged; the tree that had survived the Depression had grown in such a way that the crotch of the maple held rainwater, rotting the trunk from the inside out. If you have a seemingly healthy tree near your house, keep an eye on it. If a limb breaks, check it for brown or black colors in the center, indicating rot. Have a certified arborist give it a once-over, and make sure it s pruned correctly. Check for mushrooms on the trunk or at the base of the tree, as they can also indicate decay. The contractor who ll be helping restore the parts of the domicile that were damaged told me that he s seen a house ripped in half by a fir tree falling on it. I m thankful every day that I escaped this fate, and I want you to avoid it, too. WED., NOV. 15 TREKKING PERU: Robert and Daisy Kunstaetter, trail-tested authors and adventurous expats, share stories and slides from Trekking Peru: A Traveler s Guide at 7pm at Village Books, th St. THURS., NOV. 16 TRAVEL TALK: Take an armchair journey with Katie Storrs from 7-9pm at Whatcom Museum s Old City Hall, 121 Prospect St. Paraguaype, Jaha! Peace Corps Service in the Heart of South America will be the focus of the presentation. Suggested donation is $5. NOV GARDEN PARTY: Help the Nooksack Salmon Enhancement Association winterize, fertilize and organize its native plant nursery at an Open House Garden Party taking place from 12-4pm Wednesday through Friday at 3057 E. Bakerview Rd. Tools and gloves will be provided. FRI., NOV. 17 WILD THINGS: Kids, adults and adventurers can join Holly Roger of Wild Whatcom for a Wild Things Community Program from 9:30-11am every Friday in November at Cornwall Park. Suggested donation is $5. SAT., NOV. 18 TURKEY TROT: Join the Greater Bellingham Running Club for its annual Turkey Trot starting at 9am at Squalicum Creek Park, 1001 Squalicum Way. Entry to the 5K run and walk is $8 per person or $20 per family; 100 percent of the proceeds will be donated to the Bellingham Food Bank. WORK PARTY: Join the Nooksack Salmon Enhancement Association for a Work Party to help improve salmon habitat along Landing Strip Creek from 9am-12pm starting at Acme Elementary School, 5200 Turkington Rd. Bring sturdy shoes, weather-appropriate clothing, friends and family. Tools, gloves, coffee and snacks will be provided. CHRISTMAS IN THE WOODS: Expect surprises and fun throughout the day as organizers showcase holiday gifts and evergreens at a Christmas in the Woods Open House happening from 9am-5pm at the Garden Spot Nursery, 900 Alabama St. Entry is free. Call, come in or sign up on the nursery s website to register. doit FALL GARDENING: WSU Whatcom County Extension Master Gardeners will show you how to protect and enhance your garden soil through cover crops, mulch, drainage strategies, soil tests, crop rotation and more at a Late Fall Gardening Tips for Spring Success workshop from 10-11:30am at the Lynden Library, 216 4th St. Entry is free. (360) FALL CLEANUP: Blaine C.O.R.E. (Community Orchards for Resources and Education) hosts a Putting Your Garden to Bed (Or Not) presentation from 10am-12pm at the Blaine Library, 610 3rd St. Learn about dividing perennials, digging bulbs, storing dahlias, top-dressing beds, and more. You ll also learn about winter gardening and hoop houses. Entry is free. (360) SALMON SIGHTING: Celebrate the return of Pacific salmon by joining Nooksack Salmon Enhancement Association naturalists for a Salmon Sighting event from 12-3pm along Haynie Creek near Custer s Dakota Creek Golf Course, 3258 Haynie Rd. The free, family-friendly event will feature activities, prizes, information about successful project sites, hot beverages and more. TUES., NOV. 21 PUMPKIN PIE PUSH: Staff and volunteers are always on hand to guide the way at the weekly All- Paces Run starting at 6pm every Tuesday at Fairhaven Runners, th St. Entry is free. Tonight s Pumpkin Pie Push run will feature Brooks demos, post-run pie and prize giveaways, and more. Headlamps or flashlights are required. WAXING BASICS: Base preparation, structure and minor repair will be covered at a free Ski and Snowboard Waxing Basics clinic at 6pm at REI, th St. Register in advance OR WAKE MEETING: Don Cheyette, director of Seattle Adventure Sports, will lead an Expeditioning Made Easy presentation at Whatcom Association of Kayak Enthusiasts monthly meeting from 6:30-9pm at the lower level of the Bellingham Public Library, 210 Central Ave. The former Bellingham resident will help you consider all the details, large and small, that make any trip into an unforgettable experience. THURS., NOV. 23 TURKEY TROT: Burn off some calories before sitting down to your Thanksgiving feast by taking part in the 11th annual La Conner Turkey Trot starting at 8am at La Conner High School, 307 N. 6th St. Entry to the 5K is $20-$30. Prizes will be available for the top three overall finishers, and costumes are encouraged.

15 BY AMY KEPFERLE Alps Alert GETTING IN ON THE ACT stage THEATER DANCE PROFILES ATTEND WHAT: Sound of Music Sing-A-Long WHEN: 1pm Sun., Nov. 19 WHERE: Lincoln Theatre, Mount Vernon COST: $15-$20 INFO: www. lincolntheatre.org LAST WEEK, my officemate and I spent a few minutes of our deadline countdown belting out verses from My Favorite Things. It may not have been the appropriate time or place to croon about raindrops on roses and whiskers on kittens or bright copper kettles and warm woolen mittens, but once we started singing the hit from The Sound of Music, it was difficult to stop. Truth be told, I could ve sung the entire canon from the 1965 Academy Award-winning musical starring a dewy-eyed Julie Andrews and stern-to-soulful Christopher Plummer. I ve seen the film approximately 1,000 times, went on a themed tour when I visited Salzburg in my late teens, and have spent many Christmases with the movie playing in the background while the feast was being prepared. I ve even gotten in on the act. A couple of summers ago, I attended a Sound of Music Singalong at the multiplex with a couple of theatrically minded gal-pals who were equally enamored of the story about a wannabee nun in Austria who falls in love with a widowed naval officer after signing up to be a governess to his seven children. Along the way, the new family heals their various psychic wounds through the power of music, escapes the Nazi takeover of their beloved homeland and sings a whole lot of memorable songs. Being a part of the action was a liberating experience. Instead of having to bite our tongues during songs such as Maria, I Have Confidence, Climb Ev ry Mountain, The Lonely Goatherd, and Edelweiss, we were able to express ourselves both loudly and dramatically. In case we missed a phrase, subtitles were provided to get us back on track. At the annual pre- Thanksgiving Sing-A- Long Sound of Music taking place Sun., Nov. 19 at Mount Vernon s Lincoln Theatre, the event moves the audience interaction a step further. In addition to providing the subtitles during the screening not that you ll need them hosts Don Wick and Dave Cross will also lead participants through a vocal warmup and give a comprehensive guide to the accompanying actions and use of an interactive fun pack that will be provided to all ticket-holders. Additionally, costumes are encouraged, as is dancing in aisles. At past iterations of the cinematic collaboration with the Children s Museum of Skagit County, attendees have dressed up as anything and everything represented in the film, whether it s Mother Abbess, Liesl, a goat herder, Alps or Captain Von Trapp. An ensuing costume parade has been known to send audiences into a frenzy, and those who are liberated from the typical constraints of attending a movie make the most of their time in the spotlight, whether they re singing about a few of their favorite things or yodeling their hearts out. STAGE WED., NOV. 15 VAUDEVILLINGHAM: Attend the Bellingham Circus Guild s monthly uncensored variety show, Vaudevillingham, at 7pm and 9pm performances at the Cirque Lab, th St., suite #102. Expect to see everything from aerial performances to dance, comedy, magic, juggling, burlesque and more. Suggested donation is $5-$10. THURS., NOV. 16 GOOD, BAD, UGLY: Watch The Good, the Bad and the Ugly at 8pm every Thursday at the Upfront Theatre, 1208 Bay St. At 10pm, stick around for The Project. Entry is $5-$ OR NOV THE 39 STEPS: Alfred Hitchcock s The 39 Steps concludes this week with 7pm performances Thursday through Saturday at the Sehome High School Little Theatre, 2700 Bill McDonald Pkwy. Tickets are $8-$10. LITTLE WOMEN: Northwest Washington Theatre Group presents performances of the musical version of Louisa May Alcott s Little Women this week at 7pm Thursday through Saturday at Ferndale High School, 5830 Golden Eagle Dr. Tickets are $12-$15. ROMEO, YOU IDIOT!: The comedic Romeo, You Idiot! shows at 7:30pm Thursday through Saturday at the Heiner Theater at Whatcom Community College, 231 W. Kellogg Rd. Tickets are $3. NOV FOOLS: Neil Simon s comedic fable, Fools, concludes this week with performances at 7:30pm Thursday through Saturday, and 2:30pm Sunday at the Mount Baker High School auditorium, 4936 Deming Rd. Tickets will be $6-$8 at the door. (360) OR PETER & THE STAR CATCHER: Squalicum High School Drama presents showings of Peter and the Star Catcher at 7pm Thursday through Saturday, and 2pm Sunday at the school s Forum space, 3773 E. McLeod Rd. Tickets to the musical are $5-$10. BELLINGHAMSCHOOLS.ORG FRI., NOV. 17 BETTY DESIRE: Attend Betty Desire: Coming Home at 7:30pm at Mount Vernon s Lincoln Theatre, 712 S. First St. The iconic drag queen will spend the evening singing, dancing, bantering with doit the audience and sharing stories about being a tireless warrior for equality. Tickets are $20. NOV THE BIG SHORT: Watch three student-directed contemporary plays at performances of The BIG SHORT One-Act Festival at 7:30pm Friday and Saturday at Mount Vernon s McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way. Tickets are $2-$12. BACKYARD BRAWL: Two members of the audience will be chosen to act as team captains at performances of Backyard Brawl at 8pm and 10pm Friday and Saturday at the Upfront Theatre, 1208 Bay St. Tickets are $10-$12. SUN., NOV. 19 COMEDY SHOWCASE: Four of the Pacific Northwest s best comics will perform at the WAY North Comedy Showcase at 7pm at Mount Vernon s Farmstrong Brewing, 110 Steward Rd. An open mic will follow. Entry is free; please be 18 or over. DANCE THURS., NOV. 16 FOLK DANCE: The Balkan Folk Dancers meet from 7-9:30pm Thursdays at the Fairhaven Library, th St. Dances are taught, and mentoring is available. Suggested donation is $5. (360) NOV NEW MUSIC, NEW DANCE: Audiences can witness the collaboration between local choreographers and composers at the annual New Music, New Dance performances at 7:30pm Friday and Saturday at Western Washington University s Performing Arts Center. Entry is free. NOV BELLINGHAM REP S EMERGE: Expect to see debut performances of new works by nationally acclaimed choreographers when Bellingham Repertory Dance presents showings of Emerge at 7:30pm Friday and Saturday, and 5pm Sunday at the Firehouse Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris Ave. Entry is $12-$20. SAT., NOV. 18 CONTRA DANCE: Vermont-based band Pete s Posse will provide live tunes at the Bellingham Country Dance Society s Contra Dance taking place from 7-10:30pm at the Eagles Hall, 1125 N. Forest St. Entry is $10-$15. COUNTRYDANCE.ORG CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 15

16 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD BY AMY KEPFERLE Creative Gifting HOLIDAY HELPERS, TAKE TWO visual GALLERIES OPENINGS PROFILES IN AN era when it s possible to knock items off a holiday shopping list without even having to get out of your bathrobe and leave your domicile, it s refreshing to find that there still remains a plethora of choices for those who are still willing to step away from the computer screen to focus on creative gifting. For those on the lookout for options about what to get art-lovers in their lives, read on for details about a few events taking place this coming weekend that will help fulfill that goal. At the annual FishBoy Holiday Show taking place Sat., Nov. 18 at painter RR Clark s studio and home in the Sunnyland neighborhood, a couple of things are to be expected. The first is that the amount of color you ll be confronted with when you walk through the door is sure to soothe any seasonal chill. The second item to take note of is that it will be difficult to depart. Those of age will inevitably be offered a glass of wine, and before you know it, an hour will have passed and the genial host will have filled you in about where his nickname comes from, the latest pieces of reclaimed wood he scored, and how the painting you re interested in originated. Another warning: you may fall in love with an image of a yellow bird sitting on a blue dog, and decide you want to keep it for yourself. If that s the case, you have permission to purchase it, then have someone else wrap it up and stick it under the tree. When: 2-9pm Sat., Nov. 18 Where: 617 Virginia St. Info: That same day, the 27th annual Small Works Show, Honey, I Shrunk the Art, will open with a party and potluck at Camano Island s Matzke Fine Art Gallery & Sculpture Park. The seasonal exhibit and sale comes with a tagline of great art at a shrunken price, meaning that the diminutive pieces by the 40 artists working in glass, ceram- ics, sculpture and painting are a lot more affordable than usual, and are perfect for the gift-giving season. Arrive a little early to stroll the grounds and peruse the outdoor sculptures located throughout the 10-acre venue. The show and sale takes place weekends through Jan. 14, so if you can t make it today, you still have time to get in on the artistic action. When: 4-9pm Sat., Nov. 18. Where: 2345 Blanche Way, Camano Island Info: Those who wend their way to the second weekend of the Rexville Grange Holiday Art Show will be treated to scenic scenes in a variety of manners whether it s via witnessing a field full of trumpeter swans making themselves at home in the Skagit Valley fields on the drive to the venue, or in the canny combination of paintings, pottery, glass art, photography, jewelry, fine crafts, weaving, woodwork and more to be found in the largest grange hall in Washington state. With something for just about everyone on your nice list whether it s one-of-a-kind scarves, fine soaps, fused glass, jewelry, oil paintings of the verdant valley, stained glass art with a local focus or fine art photography we dare you to leave empty-handed. When: 10am-5pm Sat.-Sun., Nov Where: Rexville Grange Rd. Info: doit UPCOMING EVENTS WED., NOV. 15 THREADS TALK: As part of the Coded Threads exhibit currently showing at Western Washington University s Western Gallery, Bowbased sculptor Sheila Klein will talk about her work at 4:30pm at the school s Miller Hall 138. Entry is free. NOV HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS: Seasonal decor, distinctive gift items and gourmet foods can be purchased at the 36th annual Home for the Holidays from 5-9pm Thursday, 9:30am-9pm Friday, and 9:30am-5pm Saturday at the Ferndale Events Center, 5715 Barrett Rd. FRI., NOV. 17 HIDDEN NARRATIVE: Educators will facilitate discussions on select works of art from the permanent collection at a Hidden Narrative tour using Visual Thinking Strategies (VTS) from 3:30-4:30pm at La Conner s Museum of Northwest Art, 121 First St. Entry is free. SKEIN: Get an intimate glimpse into an creative human s psyche when author and multimedia artist Christen Mattix shares stories from Skein: The Heartbreaks & Triumphs of a Long-Distance Knitter at 7pm at Village Books, th St. The book focuses on the half-mile line Mattix knit from an abandoned bench to Bellingham Bay, opening up a world of interaction with her quirky Fairhaven neighbors. NOV CRAFT BAZAAR: Attend an annual Craft Bazaar from 9am-5pm Friday and Saturday at Sedro-Woolley s American Legion Post #43, 701 Murdock St. Lunch will be served from 11am-2pm both days. CIDER & ART: Painter Ben Man will host Hot Cider & Cool Art from 10am-4pm every Friday and Saturday through December at his third-floor space in the Morgan Block Studios, 1000 Harris Ave. HOLIDAY MARKET: More than 50 craft, vintage, repurposed and gift vendors will show and sell their creative wares at a Red Barn Handpicked Holiday Market taking place from 12-9pm Friday, and 10am-4pm Saturday in the Expo Building at Lynden s Northwest Washington Fairgrounds, 1775 Front St. Admission is $3. NOV FESTIVAL OF THE ARTS: More than 100 local artists and craftspeople will show and sell their creative wares as part of Allied Arts 38th annual Holiday Festival of the Arts starting this week and continuing from 10am-7pm daily through Christmas Eve (closed on Thanksgiving) at 4145 Meridian St. Live music, artist demos and workshops and family art projects will also be part of the festive fun. SAT., NOV. 18 HOLIDAY BAZAAR: Local artists and crafters will show and sell their wares at Gardenview Montessori s 11th annual Holiday Bazaar taking place from 9am-3pm at Hillcrest

17 doit Chapel, 1400 Larrabee Ave. A silent auction, a bake sale and activities for children will be part of the fun. Entry is free. ARTIST TALK: Attend an artist talk focusing on David C. Kane s 37 Little Enigmas and Victor Sandblom s Still Listening for the Sound at 3:30pm at Edison s i.e. gallery, 5800 Cains Court. ARTIST TALK: Skagit Valley artists Jane Alynn, Margaret Davidson, and Natalie Niblack will talk about their work in the exhibit Otherwise at 4:30pm at Edison s Smith & Vallee Gallery, 5742 Gilkey Ave. The show will be up through Nov SUN., NOV. 19 NELSON RECEPTION: Attend a reception for painter Terry Nelson s exhibit focused on natural elements of the Pacific Northwest from 5-7pm at Mindport Exhibits, 210 W. Holly St. ONGOING EXHIBITS ACME: Brian Cypher s Entrances, Exits and Entropy etchings will show through November in Anacortes at ACME Creative, 705 Commercial St. ALLERY: View Mary Jane Maute s dynamic paintings through November at the Allery Fine Art, 1319 Cornwall Ave., #104 (entrance is in the alley). ALLIED ARTS: View figurative works by painters Frank Frazee and Shawna Morris, as well as stone sculptures by Ruth Mueseler, at a Who s There? exhibit showing through Nov. 25 at Allied Arts, 1418 Cornwall Ave. ARTWOOD: View a vast selection of wood gifts through November at Artwood Gallery, 1000 Harris Ave. COOPER LANZA GALLERY: Group classes, private lessons, life drawing, long-pose sessions and more happen on a regular basis at Cooper Lanza Gallery and School of Fine Art, th St. DEMING LIBRARY: View Women s Works through Nov. 30 at the Deming Library, 5044 Mt. Baker Hwy. 360) FOURTH CORNER: Pop Culture: Posters, Playbills, and Paraphernalia is on display through Nov. 25 at Fourth Corner Frames & Gallery, 311 W. Holly St. GALLERY PEGASUS: View Abstract Interpretations through Dec. 31 at Gallery Pegasus, 301 W. Holly St. The exhibit features works by Yvette Neumann, Gregory S. Walsh, and Alek Kargopoltsev. GOOD EARTH POTTERY: Soda Sisters will be highlighted through November at Good Earth Pottery, 1000 Harris Ave. HONEY SALON: Sara Holodnick s Sweet/ Nothing is currently on display at Honey Salon & Gallery, 310 W. Holly St. The multimedia collection features poetry, oracle cards and intricately designed altars by the Bellinghambased artist and writer. IDEAL: Check out custom-made products using primarily materials found in nature at the 10th annual ReMade exhibit and sale through Nov. 17 at Ideal, 1227 Cornwall Ave. JANSEN ART CENTER: A Fall Juried Exhibit, Whatcom Weavers Guild s Fibers & Beyond, Illusions and Other Still Life: Paintings by Rob Gischer, and Holding Space can be viewed through Dec. 2 at Lynden s Jansen Art Center, 321 Front St. LUMMI GALLERY: Peruse seasonal exhibits at the Lummi Island Gallery at the Village Point Marina, 4232 Legoe Bay Rd. MAKE.SHIFT: Cutaway shows through November at Make.Shift Art Space, 306 Flora St. MODERN CLASSICS: Mining the Stillness of Stone shows through December at Modern Classics Furniture + Art Studio, 203 Prospect St. (360) MONA: Choices, featuring works by Portlandbased sculptor and painter Mel Katz; glass sculptor Raven Skyriver s Submerge; and Hidden Narratives a display of permanent collection paintings can be viewed through Jan. 7 at La Conner s Museum of Northwest Art, 121 N. First St. PERRY AND CARLSON: Fiona McGuigan s Reference: Deconstructed Memories and Exploration of Place can be viewed through November in Mount Vernon at Perry and Carlson Gallery, 508 S. First St. SKAGIT MUSEUM: In the Valley of Mystic Light shows through Feb. 4 in La Conner at the Skagit County Historical Museum, 501 S. 4th St. SMITH & VALLEE: Otherwise can be seen through Nov. 26 at Edison s Smith & Vallee Gallery, 5742 Gilkey Ave. WESTERN GALLERY: Coded Threads: Textile and Technology shows through Dec. 8 at Western Washington University s Western Gallery. The exhibit brings together 14 well-known artists integrating textiles with technology. WHATCOM ART MARKET: Works by Whatcom Art Guild members can be perused Wed.-Sun. at the Whatcom Art Market, th St. WHATCOM MUSEUM: Art of the American West: Highlights of the Haub Family Collection from the Tacoma Art Museum, People of the Sea and Cedar: A Journey Through the Tribal Cultures and History of the Northwest Coast, Back at the Park: Vintage Views from the Photo Archives, and John M. Edson Hall of Birds can currently be viewed on the Whatcom Museum campus. Law Offices of Alexander F. Ransom Experienced. Effective. Exceptional. Compassionate Criminal Defense Attorney Fighting for Your Rights 119 NORTH COMMERCIAL ST. SUITE #1420 OFFICE: (360) Surf & Turf Just $23.95! Sunday - Thursday Sunday thru Thursday we re pleased to offer a selection of Surf and Turf dinners, featuring our Snake River Farms Wagyu beef paired with your choice of one of our seasonal seafood specialties from Anthony s Seafood Company. #7 Bellwether Way Bellingham (360) CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 17

18 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD BY CAREY ROSS Unseasonal Sounds SAY NO TO CHRISTMAS CREEP music SHOW PREVIEWS RUMOR HAS IT AMIT PELED CHRISTMAS CREEP is real. This year, I saw my first Christmas display the day after Halloween. I walked into a store in downtown Bellingham expecting to see marked-down candy and costumes and instead walked smack into Kris Kringle. I m unabashedly infected with the spirit of the season every year, but even so, I was like, Go home, Santa. It s November 1. No one wants to see your bowl full of jelly just yet. Which explains why I ve spent the past few weeks thinking Thanksgiving was just around the corner. That surprise early snowfall did not help clear up my calendar confusion. Imagine my surprise when I realized we still have some musical miles to go before we sleep off our turkey dinners and wake up to haul out the holly. The Mount Baker Theatre is always a hotbed of holiday action, but before the Nutcrackers get cracking, Charlie Brown trims his sad tree, and Christmas Town can be saved, some nontraditional musical fare must first be served. Nontraditional is certainly a good word to describe pianist, composer and vocalist Michael Kaeshammer. He was born in Germany, lives in Canada and plays rollicking boogie-woogie music inspired by New Orleans. He s been described as technically brilliant, a charismatic virtuoso and a great piano man, but he refers to himself as just a piano player. He s not being self-effacing after 20 years and a couple of Juno Awards, he has no need to downplay his skills but says that he finds labels to be limiting. Generally, when an artist says that it s because they don t want the audience to pigeonhole them. For Kaeshammer, it s more of an internal guide, a reminder not to limit himself, and to follow his curiosity and creativity and go where the music takes him. Kaeshammer s freewheeling spirit extends to his live performances as well. With two decades spent as a professional musician and a penchant for dabbling in whatever genre or musical influence that strikes his fancy, his repertoire is vast. When combined with his preference for playing sans set list, his concerts exhibit the same freedom he brings to all his endeavors. Plus, at one point in his life, he was ATTEND WHO: Michael Kaeshammer WHEN: 7:30pm Sat., Nov. 18 COST: $ $ WHO: Whatcom Symphony Orchestra w/amit Peled WHEN: 3pm Sun., Nov. 19 COST: $15-$49 WHERE: Mount Baker Theatre, 104 N. Commercial St. INFO: theatre.com performing in Reno as an amateur magician (my hand to Wikipedia, I swear this is true), so he could very well pull a rabbit from his hat at any moment. Also falling into the vein of nontraditional music is the Whatcom Symphony Orchestra s Harmony from Discord series, which showcases works created in the face of oppression, emphasizing the power of music to transcend even the darkest of human experience. The venerable arts organization does not shy away from exploring weighty topics with their series, and their Sun., Nov. 19 concert features the talents of cello player Amit Peled, who will assist the symphony in interpreting a piece by Sharon Farber that was inspired by the story of Holocaust survivor Curt Lowens, who saved the lives of 150 Jewish children during World War II. That will be followed by Symphony No. 3 in E-flat major, Op. 55, which is far more well known by its much shorter name, Beethoven s Heroic. After that, comes Thanksgiving (finally), ushering in a program of seasonal delights at the Mount Baker Theatre. But there s plenty of music on the schedule before then to help stave off the Christmas creep. rumor has it TO KNOW WILD Buffalo owner Craig Jewell is to know a man who is constantly up to something. These things that he gets up to are never bad and are nearly always in pursuit of fun, which means that once you have him in your life, you become witness to his ongoing parade of delightful surprises. It also means that when you wake up from a text from him that just says, I DID IT, whatever he s done could be almost anything. I actually believe he could tell me he d found a unicorn, befriended it, learned its magical ways and can now travel through time and dimensions and I d be all, Sounds about right. In this case, the thing that he did was just shy of that. He booked George Clinton and Parliament Funkadelic for a March 25 BY CAREY ROSS show at the Wild Buffalo. Don t ask me how it happened. All I know is it took six months and probably just shy of eleventy jillion pleading s from Craig and possibly some of that unicorn magic I mentioned. If you re wondering to yourself whether this is the biggest show Craig has ever booked during his decade with the Wild Buffalo, the answer is a resounding hell yes. If you re wondering whether tickets will be pricier than your average cover charge, the answer is duh, but $65 to see Parliament at a tiny venue (relative to the band s legendary status) like the Wild Buffalo is the deal of the century, as far as I m concerned. If you re wondering when tickets will go on sale, the answer is last week and they re selling exactly as fast as you d think. If you think I m dying to know what s in George Clinton s rider, you d be absolutely correct. Now that we ve dispensed with all the things you re wondering about re: Craig Jewell, George Clinton and unicorn magic, I should probably mention that many, many shows will happen at the Wild Buffalo between now and March 25, and you should probably go to at least all of those too. When he s not playing in Beats Antique, David Satori teams up with two other Bay Area musicians to play in Dirtwire, a band that sounds like it could score a season of Westworld while making a stop in Ennio Morricone s neighborhood on the way. When he s not running sound at the Wild Buffalo, Rich Canut can often be found doing the same while on tour with Beats Antique. See Dirtwire when they play Nov. 16 at the Wild Buffalo and you can watch David and Rich have a tender reunion, if you re into that kind of thing. If that doesn t flip your proverbial pancakes, there s always Thunderpussy (Nov. 25), Jai Wolf (Nov. 30, sold out), Tha Dogg Pound (Dec. 1), MarchFourth Marching Band (Dec. 31), and so much more.

19 THURS., NOV. 16 JAZZ WALK: A plethora of live bands will share their talents when Whatcom Jazz Music Arts Center (WJMAC) hosts its inaugural Jazz Walk from 6-11pm at six locales in downtown Bellingham including the Sylvia Center, Make. Shift Art Space, Bayou on Bay, the Black Drop Coffee House, the Honey Moon, and Caffe Adagio Tickets are $15-$25; funds raised benefit the organizations Jazz Education Program, which helps young musicians. JANSEN JAZZ BAND: Listen to the sounds of the Jansen Jazz Band when the community collaborators helmed by Steve Herrick perform at 7:30pm at Lynden s Jansen Art Center, 321 Front St. The performance will include a special vocal performance by Bonnie VanderYacht, and popular favorites along with tunes new to the band such as Attack Of The Killer Tomatoes, Standing On Shaky Ground, Shiny Stockings, and I Love Lucy. Tickets are $10. FRI., NOV. 17 UNCLE BONSAI: The popular acoustic folk-pop trio known as Uncle Bonsai will host a CD release concert for their ninth album, The Family Feast, from 7:30-9:30pm at the Fairhaven Library, th St. Entry is $12-$15. WWU SYMPHONY: Western Washington University s Symphony Orchestra will open its new season with an international program of music from composers such as Arturo Marquez, Maurice Ravel, and Joseph Haydn at 7:30pm at the Performing Arts Center Concert Hall. Entry is free and open to the public. SAT., NOV. 18 LIGHTS IN DARKNESS: Listen to choral music that reflects varied themes of inspiration when Western Washington University s Concert Choir performs at A Light in the Darkness: Songs of Hope & Comfort at 7pm at the Church of the Assumption, 2116 Cornwall Ave. Tickets are $8-$ OR RUACH CONSORT: Come enjoy an evening of Bach, Corelli, Monteverdi, Locke, Jenkins, and a haunting ancient Icelandic hymn when Ruach Consort performs at 7pm at St. Paul s Episcopal Church, 2117 Walnut St. Entry to hear the ensemble is by donation. doit GIVING FROM THE HEART: Attend a music, art and community-focused benefit for the family of Chris Terrell the heart of the Heart of Anacortes at a Giving from the Heart event from 7-10pm at the city s Depot Art Center, 611 R Ave. In addition to tunes by Broken Banjo and the Naughty Blokes, there will be works of art for purchase, Anacortes Brewery beer, food by Arbua Pizza, and more. Entry is by donation. BLUES LEGENDS: Ben Hunter and Joe Seamons will open for headliner Curtis Salgado at the Arlington Arts Council s Legends of the Blues V concert at 7:30pm at the city s Byrnes Performing Arts Center, Crown Ridge Blvd. Tickets are $15 in advance, $20 at the door (if available). SUN., NOV. 19 MUSICAL THANKSGIVING: Members of the Skagit Community Band and the Skagit Valley College choirs will present A Musical Thanksgiving from 2-4:30pm in Mount Vernon at the school s McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way. Entry is $10-$14. MILLER & DORNFELD: Violinist Ruthie Dornfeld will join guitarist John Miller in an instrumental duo that specializes in the finest of cafe music from around the world at a 7pm concert at the YWCA Ballroom, 1026 N. Forest St. Expect to hear Venezuelan waltzes and merengues, Brazilian choros, French musette waltzes, Finnish polkas and schottishes, as well as a generous helping of Ruthie and John s original compositions. Tickets are $15. OR TUES., NOV. 21 MVHS FALL GALA: The celebrated Mount Vernon High School instrumental music department will open its season with a Fall Gala Concert at 7pm at McIntyre Hall, 2501 E. College Way. Entry is by donation. WED., NOV. 22 DYNAMIC DRUMMING: The skills of Whatcom Jazz Music Art Center founder and musician Julian MacDonough will be on display when the dynamic drummer leads a trio including pianist Blake Angelos and bassist Michael Glynn from 7-9pm at the Sylvia Center for the Arts, 205 Prospect St. Entry to give thanks for all the live jazz the city gets is $5-$10. Masks and mayhem are on the musical menu when Daikaiju makes its way to Bellingham for a Fri., Nov. 17 show at the Shakedown. World Day of Remembrance Saturday, Nov. 18, 2017 Bellingham Farmers Market 1100 Railroad Avenue 12:00 pm: Gather at Farmers Market 12:10 pm: Speakers 12:30 pm: Walk of Remembrance JOIN US for a walk of remembrance to honor our loved ones who have died on Whatcom County roads. The Nutcracker Friday November 24 at 7:00pm MOUNT BAKER THEATRE Purchase tickets at mountbakertheatre.com or call Group discounts available With Xuan Cheng and Brian Simcoe Principal Guest Artists from Oregon Ballet Theatre. Celebrate the holiday season with your favorite family tradition! Artistic Director Stephanie Harper N Saturday ovember 25 at 7:00pm presents CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 19

20 musicvenues CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD See below for venue addresses and phone numbers Alternative Library Artists' Open Stage Silent Disco Classroom: Consent and Accountability Anelia's Kitchen & Stage The Sky Colony Prozac Mountain Boys Boundary Bay Brewery Aaron Guest Brown Lantern Ale House Acoustic Night w/ditrani Bros. Open Mic Bob Fossil Commodore Ballroom Ibeyi, themind Barenaked Ladies, Ron Sexsmith Barenaked Ladies, Ron Sexsmith Conway Muse Ditrani Bros. Swindler Corner Pub Culture Cafe at Kombucha Town Knut Bell and the 360s Nick Vigarino's Back Porch Stomp Bellingham Girls Rock Camp Community Celebration Spirit of Canada: A Benefit for John Mann Aireeoke Jeremy Elliott, Ryan Sandholm Open Mic Eat Restaurant and Bar Orb Trio Tyler Morgan Clarke Trio Edison Inn WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY Curtis McMurtry (early), Peter Green Frog Head for the Hills The Novel Ideas Mulvey (late) interacting $ $49.50* Sun, Nov 26 3:00pm THANKSGIVING WEEKEND Sponsor The King and the Queen of the banjo! Jasmine Greene Band Buckman Coe (early), GrooveBot (late) MELISSA MICKELSON/ Nov /Skagit Casino Resort Slow Jam (early), The Burying Ground (late) Piano Night Open Mic (early), Guffawingham (late) Paul Klein Death From Above, The Beaches Soul Night WITH MOUNT BAKER THEATRE In the Spotlight Experience in concert the 2016 Grammy winners for Best Folk Album: fifteen-time Grammy winner and international star Béla Fleck and his singer-songwriter wife Abigail Washburn. Celebrate the holiday weekend with music that is both familiar and innovative. Tickets still available! Mostly Magic Enjoy live family entertainment for less than the movies with MBT s resident magician John Walton and special guest magician Kerry Pollock in Mostly Magic. Three showings December 9, all just $7*! Taking the Stage COMMUNITY EVENTS SUN, NOV 19 WHATCOM SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: Beethoven s Heroic FRI, NOV 24 & SAT, NOV 25 HARPER&I DANCE CENTER: The Nutcracker SAT, DEC 2 & SUN, DEC 3 OPUS PERFORMING ARTS: Winter White SAT, NOV 18 MOUNT BAKER THEATRE: Michael Kaeshammer *Plus applicable fees Season Sponsor BOOK NOW: MountBakerTheatre.com Mount Baker Theatre is a 501(c)(3) non-profit dedicated to the performing arts.

21 musicvenues See below for venue addresses and phone numbers Greene's Corner WEDNESDAY THURSDAY FRIDAY SATURDAY SUNDAY MONDAY TUESDAY Acoustic Wednesday w/greg Pitsch H2O DJ Clint Westwood Harp Attack Karaoke Honey Moon Open Mic w/pace Rubadeau WJMAC Jazz Walk Fritz and the Freeloaders Meghan Yates and The Reverie Machine Irish & Folk Monday w/ James Higgins Myron Brown and Margaret Wilder Jan and Sam and Laura Hotel Bellwether Steve Rudy Steve Rudy Alicia Dauber Quintet Christian Casolary Trio Kulshan Brewing Co. Daddy Treetops The Devilly Brothers Loco Billy's Wild Moon Saloon Livin' The Dream Cowgirls Gone Wild Knut Bell & the Blue Collars Lovitt Restaurant Ditrani Bros. Half Six Make.Shift Jazz Walk Youngblood, Maiah Manser, more Main St. Bar and Grill JP Falcon Acoustic Showcase Arcade Cowboys Jack Benson Old World Deli Rockfish Grill Wayne Hayton Andrew Norsworthy Rainy Day Ramblers Royal Dance Party Karaoke DJ Jester DJ Jester Karaoke Rumors Cabaret The Shakedown Silver Reef Hotel Casino Spa Trivia & Talent Show w/dj ShortStak DJ Intermix Flashback Friday Partylicious Saturday Fetish Night Trashy Tuesday Mad Science, Surfer Yeti, Eastsound Daikaiju, Kurly Something, Slacks In the Company of Serpents, Goya, Serial Hawk Blue Oyster Cult (Event Center), Midlife Crisis (Lounge) Skagit Casino Resort Melissa Mickelson Melissa Mickelson Skylark's Walt Burkett & Vocals Telefonic Bill MacDonough Trio Stones Throw Brewery Broken Bow Stringband Gallowglass Singin' Sam Halbert and Company The Underground DJ B-Mello DJ B-Mello The Village Inn Jam Night Karaoke Wild Buffalo 90s Night w/boombox Kid Dirtwire, Michael Manahan Typhoon, The Fourth Wall Shook Twins, The Sky Colony Lil Debbie, Raven Felix, more CURTIS MCMURTRY/Nov. 17/Green Frog Punch Up Comedy Open Mic SHOOK TWINS/Nov. 18/Wild Buffalo Lip Sync Battle Traffic, Bmoe, more Alternative Library 519 E. Maple St Anelias Kitchen & Stage 513 S. 1st St., La Conner (360) Bellewood Acres 6140 Guide Meridian, Lynden (360) Boundary Bay Brewery 1107 Railroad Ave Brown Lantern Ale House 412 Commercial Ave., Anacortes (360) The Business 216 Commercial Ave., Anacortes (360) Chuckanut Brewery 601 W. Holly St Commodore Ballroom 868 Granville St., Vancouver (604) Conway Muse Spruce/Main St., Conway (360) Corner Pub Allen West Road, Burlington Culture Cafe at Kombucha Town 2010 E. Chestnut St. Eat Restaurant & Bar 1200 Cornwall Ave The Green Frog 1015 N. State St. Edison Inn 5829 Cains Ct., Edison (360) H 2 0, 314 Commercial Ave., Anacortes (360) Honey Moon 1053 N. State St Kulshan Brewery 2238 James St Loco Billy s Wild Moon Saloon nd Ave. NW, Stanwood Make.Shift Art Space 306 Flora St. Main Street Bar & Grill 2004 Main St., Ferndale (360) McKay s Taphouse 1118 E. Maple St. (360) The Redlight 1017 N. State St. Rockfish Grill 320 Commercial Ave., Anacortes (360) The Royal 208 E. Holly St Rumors Cabaret 1119 Railroad Ave The Shakedown 1212 N. State St. Silver Reef Casino 4876 Haxton Way, Ferndale (360) Skagit Valley Casino Resort 5984 N. Darrk Lane, Bow (360) Skylark s Hidden Cafe th St Swillery Whiskey Bar 118 W. Holly St. Stones Throw Brewery 1009 Larrabee Ave. Swinomish Casino Casino Dr., Anacortes (888) Temple Bar 306 W. Champion St The Underground 211 E. Chestnut St Underground Coffeehouse Viking Union 3rd Floor, WWU Village Inn Pub 3020 Northwest Ave Vinostrology 120 W. Holly St The Waterfront 521 W. Holly St. Wild Buffalo 208 W. Holly St. To get your live music listings included, send info to Deadlines are always at 5pm Friday. CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 21

22 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD REVIEWED BY PETER RAINER Loving Vincent ART IMITATES ART film MOVIE REVIEWS FILM SHORTS LOVING VINCENT is billed as the world s first fully painted feature film, and I have no reason to doubt the claim. The Vincent in the title of this very strange movie is the great Dutch artist Vincent van Gogh, and you would think he already had more than his share of biopics. The most famous, of course, is Vincente Minnelli s very fine Lust for Life, starring Kirk Douglas in one of his best seething performances. Maurice Pialat s Van Gogh has its adherents, as does Paul Cox s Vincent, which makes great use of the painter s canvases and letters to his brother and benefactor Theo. There s also Akira Kurosawa s Dreams, featuring a segment with Martin Scorsese as Van Gogh still my favorite piece of miscasting in all of cinema. Best, perhaps, is Robert Altman s rarely seen Vincent & Theo, starring Tim Roth as Van Gogh, one of the very few movies that demonstrates, without any romanticizing, the ferment that can underlie great artistry. It has some of the same tumultuous emotionality as Van Gogh s paintings. Loving Vincent, co-directed by Hugh Welchman and Polish animator Dorota Kobiela, is framed as a kind of Citizen Kane-style detective story focusing on Van Gogh s frenzied final months in Auvers-sur-Oise, France, where, in 1890, he fatally shot himself. (The film s title is derived from Van Gogh s signoffs to his beloved brother in his letters Your loving Vincent. ) Before we get into the substance of the film, attention must be paid to how its imagery came to be. (In a sense, style and substance in this movie are synonymous.) I always feel a little guilty about criticizing animated features because the painstaking work that goes into creating even a bad animated movie is so often staggering. Loving Vincent took seven years to complete and involved 125 artists hand-painting some 65,000 frames of film. About 130 of Van Gogh s paintings are dynamically reproduced in the flow of images using this method, in which everything is first filmed as live-action and then rotoscoped with animation. The scenario, if not the imagery, is fairly straightforward. Upon hearing the news of Vincent s death, Armand Roulin (voiced by Douglas Booth), at the request of his postmaster father, Joseph (Chris O Dowd), is tasked with delivering the last letter from Vincent (the Polish theater actor Robert Gulaczyk) to Theo. Armand reluc- Loving Vincent took seven years to complete and involved 125 artists handpainting some 65,000 frames of film tantly complies, only to discover that Theo, too, has died. He decides to stay in Auvers-sur-Oise and uncover what really happened to Van Gogh in the end. (Armand also acts as the film s narrator.) In the course of his detective work, he encounters various villagers who all seem to have their own theories about the artist s demise. Some even believe he was murdered. (This theory was actually put forth, without any definitive proof, in a celebrated recent biography by Gregory White Smith and Steven Naifeh.) As the townspeople take turns offering up their version of events, we recognize some of their faces from Van Gogh s famous portraits, including Marguerite Gachet (Saoirse Ronan) and her father, Dr. Paul Gachet (Jerome Flynn), who treated Van Gogh in his last days. The filmmakers resort to multiple flashbacks of Van Gogh s life, which, unlike the present-day imagery, are exclusively in black and white a mistake, I think, because the grayed-out effect drags down the look of the entire film, which is otherwise almost riotous with color. But what exactly are we getting with this vast swirl of colorations, these 65,000 frames of rotoscoped reproductions? It s kind of kicky to pick out all the paintings as the story ensues: The Night Café, Wheatfield with Crows, Starry Night, and many others. But in the end, we are viewing, at best, deft and at worst, kitschy renderings of great paintings. The reproductions can t possibly match the originals emotional fervor. How could they? There s another problem here, which is especially typical of movies about great, tortured artists. The filmmakers want us to understand Van Gogh s mind through his work, and while this approach certainly has its pop psych fascinations, it s ultimately too glib. The correlation between how an artist lives his life, and the work he produces in that life, is too complicated, perhaps too unknowable, for such one-to-one connections. Still, the fact that this movie, with its 65,000 painted frames, was even attempted, is daunting. It s the kind of folly that demands a measure of respect, for the effort, if not altogether for the result.

23 Jane: The amazing life and groundbreaking work of Jane Goodall and her beloved chimps, of course are examined in this documentary featuring footage culled from more than 100 hours of never-beforeseen film hidden away in the National Geographic Jigsaw: Remember back in 2010, when we were told that Saw 3D would be the final film of this franchise? Torture porn never dies. H (R 1 hr. 32 min.) Murder on the Or ient Express: Kenneth Branagh dons the most magnificent mustache ever seen on the big screen to play Agatha Christie s Hercule Poirot, who must solve the author s most famous mystery amid a cast that includes Johnny Depp, Penelope Cruz, Willem Dafoe, Michelle Pfeiffer, and the inimitable Judi Dench. HH (PG 2 hrs. 7 min.) Justice League: If Hollywood rumors are to be believed, Gal Gadot has reportedly told Warner Bros. that she will only return to play Wonder Woman in the sequel to this summer s breakout blockbuster if producer Brett Ratner, who has been accused of sexual assault, is booted from the project. Who cares about the rest of the Justice League (except you, Jason Momoa)? Gadot is hero enough for them all. HHH (PG-13 1 hr. 50 min.) Let There Be Light: Kevin Sorbo used to be television s Hercules, but he now evidently devotes his acting energy to starring in conservative Christian movies about atheists who have near-death experiences and spoiler alert! find God. I liked him better when he played a god on TV rather than making movies trying to prove the existence of God. H (PG-13 1 hr. 40 min.) Only The Brave: On June 30, 2013, 20 members of the elite Granite Mountain Hotshot firefighting team walked into the woods to fight the Yarnell Hill Fire. Only one walked out. This is their story, told via a top-notch cast Josh Brolin, Miles Teller, Jennifer Connelly, and Jeff Bridges and some sweat-inducing special effects. HHHHH (PG-13 2 hrs. 14 min.) The Square: This unusual Swedish film has been referred to as a slapstick tragedy and has critics delighted and confounded in equal measure. Part satire of the art world, part commentary on altruism and the human condition, it comes from Swedish director Wonder: It s been a minute since Julia Roberts has made a movie that reminds us of her status as America s Sweetheart, but she s back with the heartwarming story of Auggie (in another remarkable turn by Room s Jacob Tremblay) a boy with congenital facial deformities who is learning to find his way in the world. HHHH (PG 1 hr. 53 min.) B-BOARD 24 FILM 2 2 MUSIC 18 ART 16 WORDS 12 Lov ing Vincent: See review previous page. HHHH (PG-13 1 hr. 34 min.) Showtimes Regal and AMC theaters, please see Pickford Film Center and PFC s Limelight Cinema, please see CURRENTS 8 Happy Death Day: This is the Groundhog s Day of horror movies in which a young coed (because it s always a young coed) is killed over and over again until presumably she figures out who is doing the murdering and dispatches him/her accordingly only to have them rise again for at least two or three more sequels. HH (PG-13 1 hr. 36 min.) archives for more than half a century. HHHHH (PG 90 min.) VIEWS 6 Geostorm: This sci-fi action movie reminded me that Gerard Butler still exists, so that s something. H (PG13 1 hr. 49 min.) WONDER MAIL 4 The Flor ida Project: With Tangerine, we were introduced to director Sean Baker and what an introduction it was. He s back with another insightful, big-hearted look at life on the margins as seen through the eyes of 6-year-old Moonee, who lives in the low-income shadow of Florida s Magic Kingdom. This has been dubbed the movie of the year by many a critic, so see it now before it is nominated for a million Oscars and you re lamenting the fact that you missed it. HHHHH (R 1 hr. 55 min.) DO IT 2 Daddy s Home 2: The unlikely comedy team of Mark Wahlberg and Will Ferrell are back to bring you seasonal cheer (already?) and they re bringing Mel Gibson with them. Remember when Gibson was the most problematic man in Hollywood? Boy, that really seems like a simpler time. H (PG-13 1 hr. 38 min.) Thor: Ragnarok: So much of the enormous success of the Marvel Cinematic Universe can be tied to savvy hiring practices. From taking a huge risk in choosing Robert Downey Jr. to anchor the franchise as Iron Man to tapping Joss Whedon to helm its first two Avengers movies, Marvel knows how to find and foster superheroes. They re back at it again, picking What We Do in the Shadows Taika Waititi to take some of the Shakespearean starch out of Thor and give him the sense of humor he s been sorely lacking. HHHHH (PG-13 2 hrs. 10 min.) Blade Runner 2049: It s finally here and it is brilliant. I know. I m shocked too. HHHHH (R 2 hrs. 44 min.) #46.12 A Bad Moms Chr istmas: Stay away from me with your Christmas creep, Hollywood. I m not ready for it yet. HH (R 1 hr. 57 min.) STAGE 15 The Star: I asked Hollywood for fewer sequels and remakes and more original content and got this animated version of the Nativity story (you know, no room at the inn, the Star of Bethlehem, etc.) as told from the perspective of the animals involved, notably an adventure-seeking donkey named Bo. Touche, Hollywood. HH (PG 1 hr. 26 min.) CASCADIA WEEKLY FILM SHORTS GET OUT 14 Ruben Ostlund, the man behind 2014 s Force Majeure. HHHH (R 2 hrs. 22 min.) BY CAREY ROSS FOOD 30 film showing this week 23

24 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD MIND & BODY Learn how to use the new Foundation Directory Online (FDO) to find grant money for your nonprofit at a free "Finding Funders for Your Nonprofit" class from 1-2:30pm Thurs., Nov. 16 at the Bellingham Public Library, 210 Central Ave. The FDO is a searchable collection of profiles of 140,000 grant-makers and foundations. You can create searches to find grantmakers who care about the services your nonprofit provides and the populations you serve. Class includes handson practice. Please register in advance. More info: (360) or Find out more about "Stretching for Health and Fitness" when licensed massage therapist and physical trainer Susan Guttzeit leads a workshop on the topic at 6:30pm Thurs., Nov. 16 at Mount Vernon's Skagit Valley Food Co-op, 202 S. First St. Entry is free. Register in advance. More info: www. communityfood.coop Reiki practitioners from all lineages, teachers and methods, and guests, can attend a "Reiki Share" from 5-6:30pm Mon., Nov. 21 at Wise Awakening, 314 E. Holly St. This is an opportunity for each "giver" to get a chance to be a "receiver." Entry is $5 for practitioners, $10 for guests. The event takes place the third Monday of every month. More info: Attend a Healing Hour from 5:30-6:30pm every Wednesday at Simply Spirit Reading & Healing Center, 1304 Meador Ave. Drop in anytime during the hour to receive an aura/ chakra healing. Entry is $5. More info: "Chair Tai Chi" takes place at 3pm Thursdays through November at the SkillShare Space at the Bellingham Public Library, 210 Central Ave. Chair Tai Chi uses all of the concepts and flowing choreographed movements of standing Tai Chi except it is performed in a seated position. Entry is free. More info: (360) Attend "Yoga for Limited Mobility" from 10-11:30am Thursdays at the Lummi Island Library, 2144 S. Nugent Rd. Kathleen Gallagher leads bulletinboard 200 MIND & BODY the free gatherings. More info: (360) Attend Gam-Anon meetings (for family and friends of individuals with a gambling disorder) from 7-8:30pm Fridays in Mount Vernon at the First Lutheran Church, 2015 Blackburn Rd. Entry is free. More info: Co-Dependents Anonymous meets from 7-8:30pm most Mondays at Peace- Health St. Joseph's Community Health Education Center, 3333 Squalicum Pkwy, conference room B. Entry is 200 MIND & BODY by donation. More info: (360) Abby Staten leads "Yoga for Multiple Sclerosis" classes from 10-11am Tuesdays and 11am-12pm Fridays at Christ the Servant Lutheran Church, 2600 Lakeway Dr. The weekly events are free for people with MS, and no registration is required. Please bring a blanket or yoga mat. More info: com or com Sex Addicts Anonymous (SAA) meets at 7pm Tuesdays LOOKING FOR A PLACE TO CALL HOME? WE CAN HELP REACH YOUR REAL ESTATE GOALS! Free Home Inspection with Consultation Call Jerry Swann For Details! Best Choice R E A L T Y Broker# MIND & BODY and Thursdays and 9am Saturdays at the Bellingham Unitarian Fellowship, 1207 Ellsworth St. More info: (360) or A Grief Support Group meets at 7pm every Tuesday at the St. Luke's Community Health Education Center, 3333 Squalicum Pkwy. The free, drop-in support group is for those experiencing the recent death of a friend or loved one. More info: Attend Zumba classes from 5:30-6:30pm Tuesdays at the Lynden Library, 216 4th St. No experience is necessary; join instructor David Renteria for the free class and bring a water bottle, comfortable clothing and shoes. More info: (360) Join Lynne to prevent 25 pounds of greenhouse gas at lunch. More info: (360) Wondering about the nuts and bolts of the homebuying process? Check out our FREE Homebuyer Education classes. Held monthly & open to the public. Register at , x2 BY ROB BREZSNY FREE WILL ASTROLOGY ARIES (March 21-April 19): "Many people go fishing all their lives without knowing that it is not fish they are after," observed Henry David Thoreau. The spirit of Thoreau's observation is true about every one of us to some extent. From time to time, we all try to satisfy our desires in the wrong location, with the wrong tools, and with the wrong people. But I'm happy to announce that his epigram is less true for you now than it has ever been. In the coming months, you will have an unusually good chance to know exactly what you want, be in the right place at the right time to get it, and still want it after you get it. And it all starts now. TAURUS (April 20-May 20): I predict that during the next 10 months, you will generate personal power and good fortune as you ripen your skills at creating interesting forms of intimacy. Get started! Here are some tips to keep in mind. 1. All relationships have problems. Every single one, no exceptions! So you should cultivate relationships that bring you useful and educational problems. 2. Be very clear about the qualities you do and don't want at the core of your most important alliances. 3. Were there past events that still obstruct you from weaving the kind of togetherness that's really good for you? Use your imagination to put those events behind you forever. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You may be entertaining an internal dialog that sounds something like this: "I need a clear yes or a definitive no...a tender revelation or a radical revolution...a lesson in love or a cleansing sex marathon but I'm not sure which! Should I descend or ascend? Plunge deeper down, all the way to the bottom? Or zip higher up, in a heedless flight into the wide open spaces? Would I be happier in the poignant embrace of an intense commitment or in the wild frontier where none of the old rules can follow me? I can't decide! I don't know which part of my mind I should trust!" If you do hear those thoughts in your brain, Gemini, here's my advice: There's no rush to decide. What's healthiest for your soul is to bask in the uncertainty for a while. CANCER (June 21-July 22): According to storyteller Michael Meade, ancient Celtic culture believed that "a person was born through three forces: the coming together of the mother and father, an ancestral spirit's wish to be reborn, and the involvement of a god or goddess." Even if you don't think that's literally true, the coming weeks will be a favorable time to have fun fantasizing it is. That's because you're in a phase when contemplating your origins can invigorate your spiritual health and attract good fortune into your life. So start with the Celtic theory, and go on from there. Which of your ancestors may have sought to live again through you? Which deity might have had a vested interest in you being born? What did you come to this earth to accomplish? Which of your innate potentials have you yet to fully develop, and what can you do to further develop them? LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I predict that starting today and during the next 10 months, you will learn more about treating yourself kindly and making yourself happy than you have in years. You will mostly steer clear of the mindset that regards life as a numbing struggle for mere survival. You will regularly dream up creative ideas about how to have more fun while attending to the mundane tasks in your daily rhythm. Here's the question I hope you will ask yourself every morning for the next 299 days: "How can I love myself wth devotion and ingenuity?" VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): This may be the most miscellaneous horoscope I've ever created for you. That's apropos, given the fact that you're a multifaceted quick-change artist these days. Here's your sweet mess of oracles. 1. If the triumph you seek isn't humbling, it's not the right triumph. 2. You may have an odd impulse to reclaim or recoup something that you have not in fact lost. 3. Before transmutation is possible, you must pay a debt. 4. Don't be held captive by your beliefs. 5. If you're given a choice between profane and sacred love, choose sacred. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The next 10 months will be an ideal time to revise and revamp your approach to education. To take maximum advantage of the potentials, create a master plan to get the training and knowledge you'll need to thrive for years to come. At first, it may be a challenge to acknowledge that you have a lot more to learn. The comfort-loving part of your nature may be resistant to contemplating the hard work it will require to expand your worldview and enhance your skills. But once you get started, you'll quickly find the process becoming easier and more pleasurable. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): "Everything that can be invented has been invented." - Charles H. Duell, Director of the U.S. Patent Office, "Heavierthan-air flying machines are impossible." - Lord Kelvin, President, Royal Society, "All the music that can be written has already been written. We're just repeating the past." - 19th-century composer Tschaikovsky. "Video won't be able to hold on to any market it captures after the first six months. People will soon get tired of staring at a box every night." - filmmaker Darryl F. Zanuck, commenting on television in I hope I've provided enough evidence to convince you to be faithful to your innovative ideas, Scorpio. Don't let skeptics or conventional thinkers waylay you. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Of all the signs in the zodiac, you Sagittarians are most likely to buy a lottery ticket that has the winning numbers. But you're also more likely than everyone else to throw the ticket in a drawer and forget about it, or else leave it in your jeans when you do the laundry, rendering the ticket unreadable. Please don't be like that in the coming weeks. Make sure you do what's necessary to fully cash in on the good fortune that life will be making available. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In the game of basketball, if a player is fouled by a member of the opposing team, he is given a "free throw." While standing 15 feet away, he takes a leisurely shot at the basket without having to deal with any defenders. Studies show that a player is most likely to succeed at this task if he shoots the ball underhanded. Yet virtually no professionals ever do this. Why? Because it doesn't look cool. Everyone opts to shoot free throws overhand, even though it's not as effective a technique. Weird! Let's invoke this as a metaphor for your life in the coming weeks, Capricorn. In my astrological opinion, you'll be more likely to accomplish good and useful things if you're willing to look uncool. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In 1991, Aquarius rock star Axl Rose recorded the song "November Rain" with his band Guns N' Roses. It had taken him eight years to compose it. Before it was finally ready for prime time, he had to whittle it down from an 18-minute-long epic to a more succinct nine-minute ballad. I see the coming weeks as a time when you should strive to complete work on your personal equivalent of Axl's opus. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Thomas Edison was a prolific inventor whose work led to the creation of electric lights, recorded music, movies, and much more. When he was 49 years old, he met Henry Ford, a younger innovator who was at the beginning of his illustrious career. Ford told Edison about his hopes to develop and manufacture low-cost automobiles, and the older man responded with an emphatic endorsement. Ford later said this was the first time anyone had given him any encouragement. Edison's approval "was worth worlds" to him. I predict, Pisces, that you will receive comparable inspiration from a mentor or guide or teacher in the next nine months. Be on the lookout for that person.

25 & FOOD 30 healthwellness Stacey Sova, Master Esthetician Certified in PCA Skin chemical peels. 60 min. facial for $55 ($85 value) Lash lift $40 ($70 value) Locally owned, private treatment room, passionate about skincare and helping people achieve their skincare goals Rimland Drive, Suite 301 # FILM 2 2 BREATH AS A PATH TO FREEDOM - Sat. Sept. 23rd BODY FREEDOM AS A PATH TO CONSCIOUSNESS - Sat. Oct. 21st SUBTLE ENERGY AND THE BODY ELECTRIC - Sat. Dec. 2nd MUSIC 18 20% off 2 or more gift certificates Breath, Body, and Energy Workshops To RSVP, for more info, and private sessions: energenesis.net or ART 16 10% off 1 gift certificate Cheerful Healthy Massage GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 Chinese Service, Open 7 days, 9am - 10pm 1530A Birchwood Ave (Park Manor Shopping Center) WORDS 12 Foot Massage: $20/30min ~ $30/60min Combo Massage: (30min body + 40min foot) $60/70min Full Body Massage: $60/60min ~ $85/90min Swan Bender LMT Injury Recovery & Stress Relief CURRENTS 8 $10 off 1st 60 minute massage! VIEWS 6 JESSICA PERRY, MS, LAC BELLINGHAMORTHOPUNCTURE. COM 1111 W EST H OLLY S T, S UITE G1 B ELLINGHAM Mind - Body - Spirit Specializing in Deep Tissue, Neuromuscular Massage, Trigger Point Treatment and Ashiatsu Deep Feet Therapy Intuitive Deep Tissue Massage Health - Beauty - Fitness - Spirituality Good health and a happy spirit are gifts everyone seeks. Your business can join our services directory for as little as $20 * You ll help support one of the most looked at sections of Cascadia Weekly, and in turn your business will be seen by thousands of readers each week. Contact us at or * minimum 13 weeks, some restrictions apply got pain? Bill L. Lampman, LMP MAIL ONLINE SCHEDULING DO IT North State St. Suite 318 Bellingham, WA Easy online scheduling SwanBenderLMT.com Results Based Acupuncture Licensed Massage Practitioner Lily Elkjaer Giesecke LMP License # W. Holly St, Suite G-2 Bellingham, WA evergreenbellingham.com Riverflame Transformation SPECIALIZING IN DEEP TISSUE THERAPY By appointment (360) Insurance not accepted Results unmatched IntuitiveDeepTissue.com GET RELIEF! Erika Rado, LMT(lic#5222) Medical Massage Art Readings Holistic Intuitive Healing Healing people, pets & groups in person & remotely Spirit Bird Intuitive Arts Call for appointment: Free Massage! Buy 3, get 1 FREE! #46.12 For more information visit or call Downtown Location PRESENTS CASCADIA WEEKLY JANUARY 12 - APRIL 29, 2018 Energenesis Institute John W. Davis 200 HOUR VINYASA YOGA TEACHER TRAINING B-BOARD B-BOARD TO PLACE YOUR AD OR 25

26 rearend "Ate by Ate" it does not make 64 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 Across 1 One who saves the day 5 vu 9 Pricey violin, for short 14 It has pressing work to do 15 Bus. boss 16 Type of twisted wit 17 Rock, in rockpaper-scissors 18 Ceremony 19 Flaxen fabric 20 Warring with words 23 Camera or eye part 24 Binary digit 25 Bat symbol in the night sky, e.g. 28 Maggie's big brother 30 P.I., slangily 33 Start of a rhyming fitness motto 34 Timbuktu's country 35 Orange pool ball number 36 Like some raisins and pretzels 39 Took the bus 40 Crowning point 41 Creator of Winniethe-Pooh 42 Mom on the farm 43 Gripe 44 Soft stroke THE FASHION INDUSTRY IS THE 2 ND LARGEST INDUSTRIAL POLLUTER IN THE WORLD YOU CAN MAKE A DIFFERENCE Buy Thrift Extend the life of existing garments & reduce demand for new consumer goods 30 WEAR Be Selective Apply the Wear 30 Rule: only buy garments you know you ll wear at least 30 times Upcycle Learn to sew, mend, and creatively reinvent your wardrobe This ad was funded through a grant from the Washington State Department of Ecology. While these materials were reviewed for grant consistency, this does not necessarily constitute endorsement by Ecology. 45 "Yes" indication 46 Stereotypical reactions to fireworks 47 "Ignore the critics," in modern parlance 55 Pearl Jam's debut single 56 Eager 57 Graph line 58 Fixes, as a piano 59 Suspense novelist Hoag GOP running mate Jack 61 Stylish 62 It may go downhill near the end of the year 63 Garden in Genesis Down 1 Old audio system 2 " Brockovich" (Julia Roberts film) 3 Civil rights icon Parks 4 In a risky situation 5 Throw off course 6 Interstate driver's options 7 Ballet leap 8 Breezed through a test 9 Like some initial P's 10 Large family group 11 "Class Reunion" author Jaffe 12 Work without (be daring) 13 Small unit of force 21 Muse of love poetry 22 Order of Greek architecture 25 Bolivia's constitutional capital 26 "This We Do It" (1995 R&B hit) 27 Crystal-centered rock 28 "Disjointed" star Kathy 29 The "A" in A-Rod 30 Book cover info 31 2, 4, 6, 8, e.g. 32 Gives up 34 GPS displays, often 35 Reasonable treatment 37 Glorifies 38 Warren Buffett's city 43 Wooded area 44 Frank 45 When to look a gift horse in the mouth 46 "Astro Boy" genre 47 Roles, proverbially 48 Reunion attendee 49 "Proud Mary" singer Turner 50 Gangsters' heaters 51 Horse track shape 52 Canned 53 End-of-exam announcement 54 Channel that debuted in 1979 Last Week s Puzzle 2017 Jonesin Crosswords 26 (360) N Forest St. ragfinery.com

27 BY AMY ALKON THE SCIENCE ADVICE GODDESS REIGN OF TERRIER I know humans are typically your subject, but this is a relationship question, so I hope you ll consider answering it. I have a new puppy (an 8-pound terrier mutt). I eventually want her to sleep in bed with me. However, she s not toilet-trained yet, so I crate her at night in the laundry room (in a small dog cage). She cries all night. It s heartbreaking. Please help! Sleepless In Dogtown We call dogs man s best friend and treat them just like our human best friends if at 11 p.m. you say to your BFF, Wow wouldja look at the time, gently remove her beer from her hand, and usher her to her cage in your laundry room. Crate training, recommended by vets, breeders, and the American Kennel Club, involves confining a dog to a den a cage or gated-off area with her bed and her favorite toys to dismember. However, the crate is not supposed to be used for punishment as a sort of Doggy San Quentin but, say, for times you can t watch her to keep her from using the $3,000 leather couch as a chew toy or the antique Persian rug as an opulently colored hand-knotted toilet. The problem you re experiencing in crating your dog at night comes out of doggy-human coevolution. Anthrozoologist John W.S. Bradshaw explains that over generations, we humans bred dogs to be emotionally dependent on us. Not surprisingly, dogs miss their owners, sometimes desperately, when they are separated from them and other dogs don t seem to fill the emotional void. In one of Bradshaw s studies of 40 Labrador retrievers and border collies well over 50 percent of the Labs and almost half of the collies showed some kind of separation distress when left alone. Fortunately, puppies can be trained to understand that your picking up your car keys isn t human-ese for Goodbye forever! Bradshaw s advice in Dog Sense : Pick up keys, go to door, praise dog. Next: Pick up keys. Go out door. Come right back in. Praise dog. Next: Go out for increasingly longer intervals and go back a stage (timewise) if the dog shows anxiety. And good news for you: You probably don t have to spoon with your dog to keep her from feeling separation distress at night. My tiny Chinese crested now sleeps (uh, snores like a cirrhotic old wino) on my pillow, resting her tiny snout on my neck. However, back before she had her bathroom business under control, I went through the crying-at-night-in-the-crate thing (actually a gated alcove by my office). I felt like the second coming of Cruella de Vil. Then I remembered something about dogs: They have a sense of smell on the level of superhero powers. Maybe my dog didn t have to be in bed; maybe near bed would do. I snagged a big see-through plastic container (maybe 4 feet long and 3 feet high) that my neighbors were tossing out. At bedtime, I put it next to my bed and put my dog in it with her bed and a pee pad. She turned around three times, curled up, and went to sleep after giving me a look I m pretty sure said, Hey, next time you re gonna throw me in the hole, gimme some notice, and I ll menace the mailman and chase the neighbors bratty children with a sharpened Nylabone. FUR WHEELIN I keep seeing men pushing dogs in baby strollers and carrying dogs as women do. What's going on? An epidemic of sissified men? If I ever did this, I d hope my family would have me committed. Disturbed Release the hounds! does lose some of its punch when it s followed by as soon as you can unzip them from their polka-dot stroller. Thankfully, the Centers for Disease Control lists no reports of an outbreak of Pomeranians poking their little heads out of man purses. However, you re right; dog strollers are increasingly becoming a thing. As for why this is, think Field of Dreams : If you build it and sell it at Petco, people will buy it so they won t have to leave their old, tired, and/or disabled doggy home alone. As for what pushing a doggybuggy says about a man, anthropologists and zoologists would call this a costly signal. This is an extravagant or risky trait or behavior that comes with a substantial price which suggests that the quality being displayed is for real. An example of this is conspicuous waste signaling vast wealth by using $100 bills as birdcage liners. Accordingly, it takes a man with masculinity to burn to not fear putting off all those women who previously announced to their friends, We want sensitive men! though not, you know, put their Shih Tzu in a baby stroller sensitive. 2017, Amy Alkon, all rights reserved. Got a problem? Write Amy Alkon Let s talk turkey! 5 0 % o f f S e l ect paraphernal i a 2 5 % o f f S e l ect flower in store now! CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 27

28 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD November 18th FEATURING Linde Husk & Whitney Buckingham at Hadrian Stone Design Studio & Gallery 1 pm - 6 pm Regular Store Hours Open Wed. - Sun. 1-5 pm Closed Mon. & Tue. FREE PARKING! 5717 Gilkey Ave, Bow, WA LOVING VINCENT (PG-13) 107m "Loving Vincent is gorgeous. It's a film of immersive beauty." Globe and Mail Fri: (4:10), 6:30, 8:45; Sat: (2:30), 4:45, 7:00, 9:15 Sun: (10:45AM), (1:00), (3:15), 5:30, 7:45; Mon: (4:10), 6:30, 9:30 Tue: (4:10), 8:45; Wed & Thu: (1:50), (4:10), 6:30, 8:45 THE FLORIDA PROJECT (R) 115m - - ENDS TUESDAY Warm, winning, and gloriously alive, Sean Baker s The Florida Project is poignant look at childhood with a career-best by Willem Dafoe. Fri: (3:30), 6:15, 9:00; Sat: (12:45), 3:30, 6:15, 9:00 Sun: (2:30), 5:15, 8:00; Mon: (3:30), 9:00; Tue: (3:30), 6:15, 9:00 THE FLY (1955) (NR) 94m - Rocket Sci-fi Matinees A scientist has a horrific accident when he uses a teleportation device. Sat: (Noon) - Only $3 admission, Introduction by Steve Meyers LA BOHEME (NR) 215m - Royal Opera House Irresistible in its witty, passionate blend of comedy and tragedy, the opera focuses on a group of young artists on the bohemian fringes of Paris. Sun: 11:00AM - Tix: $16 PFC Members / $20 General Admission / $10 Students BAILEY. (NR) 128m - The story of a student dealing with Huntington's Disease by local filmmakers + WWU grads Penelope Kipps & Tristan Olson. Mon: (6:30) - Your ticket includes a champagne reception, Q+A to follow FERRARI 312B: WHERE THE REVOLUTION BEGINS (NR) 85m The story of one of the most ground-breaking, beautiful Ferraris ever made. Tue: 6:30 LADY BIRD (R) 115m - The film is a dazzling collaboration between two of the most impressive art-house actresses of the past decade: Greta Gerwig & Saoirse Ronan. Wed & Thu: (1:35), (3:55), 6:15, 8:35 October by Linde Husk Before the Fire Beechie by Whitney Buckingham NOW PLAYING Fri, November 17 - Thu, November 23 PICKFORD FILM CENTER 1318 Bay St Doktoberfest Bier now on tap! Enjoy a drink while you watch. Mary's Happy Hour: M-F, 4-6pm $1 off Beer + Wine PFC S LIMELIGHT CINEMA: 1416 Cornwall Ave. Parentheses ( ) denote bargain pricing JANE (PG) 90m - Drawing from over 100 hrs of never-before-seen footage, director Brett Morgen tells the story of Jane Goodall, a woman whose chimpanzee research challenged the male-dominated scientific consensus and revolutionized our understanding of the natural world. Fri: (4:00), 6:15; Sat: (10:45AM), (4:00), 6:15 Sun: (10:45AM), (1:00), (3:15), 5:30; Mon - Thu: (4:00), 6:15 THE SQUARE (R) 142m - "A potent satire." - "Wickedly funny." - "An art installation outside the museum." - "Lands its bullseyes, over and over." - "This slapstick tragedy will knock the wind out of you." Fri: 8:30; Sat: (1:00), 8:30; Sun: 7:45; Mon & Tue: 8:30 Wed & Thu: (1:00), 8:30 rearend comix

29 rearend comix Sudoku INSTRUCTIONS: Arrange the digits 1-9 so that each digit occurs once in each row, once in each column, and once in each box Arlington Arts Council presents Legends of the Blues V Curtis Salgado 7:30 p.m. Saturday November 18, 2017 Byrnes Performing Arts Center, Arlington Crown Ridge Blvd Ben Hunter & Joe Seamons Tickets are $15 (plus fee) at brownpapertickets.org at Flowers by George 335 N. Olympic Ave, Arlington $20 at the door as supplies last Kids under 12 free Paid for in part by lodging tax grants from Arlington and Snohomish County CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 29

30 CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD STORY AND PHOTO BY LAUREN KRAMER Camber DOING GOOD THINGS chow RECIPES REVIEWS PROFILES SPEND HALF an hour in a restaurant and you can typically tell if its owners know what they re doing. At Camber, one of the newest additions to Bellingham s food and coffee scene, it s obvious from the get-go that the three partners at its helm are nothing short of brilliant. The food is exceptional, the atmosphere is warm, bright and friendly, the coffee is utterly divine and the space itself is nothing short of wow. David Yake and his partners Andrew Bowman and Todd Elliott took the former location of the Comics Place at the intersection of Holly and Bay streets and transformed the 1927-era space into an airy, open, modern, inviting, light-filled sanctuary where you can eat a healthy breakfast, lunch or dinner while drinking the kind of latte you almost can t bear to put down (yes, it s that delicious). The coffee selection changes daily, but the day we sat down for lunch the menu offered Guatemala Santa Isabel, Congo Kivu decaf, and Ethiopia Borona Korie. Also on offer is a selection of boutique teas, beers you won t find elsewhere, mimosas, a wine list and even a selection of milkshakes. We wanted Camber to be welcoming to different kinds of guests, accommodating business meetings, laptop work, date night or a friendly get-together, Yake says. Ours is a funny model because we re equal parts coffee shop and restaurant. We just want to be known for doing good things and serving delicious food and drink any hour of the day. I m pleased to report that Yake and his team are meeting and exceeding their goal. If the drinks menu doesn t stun you into submission, the food selections certainly will. At lunchtime we placed a special order of one of the breakfast staples, a Breakfast Salad ($14) comprised of greens, salmon, hardboiled eggs, goat cheese, cucumber ribbons, popped quinoa and a delicate almond-milk dressing. It was wholesome, healthy, delicious and enduring as this alone fueled me right through to dinner. We also tried the curried butternut squash soup ($8), a generous bowl of zesty orange decorated with coconut cream, sesame oil and cilantro. It was the kind of soup that warms your soul and offers a perfect solution to days when rain pelts Bellingham relentlessly. We d heard the Veggie Sandwich ($13) was remarkable, and it lived up to its reputation. Served EAT WHAT: Camber WHERE: 221 W. Holly St. WHEN: 7am-10pm Mon.-Fri., 8am- 10pm Sat.-Sun. INFO: coffee.com on a Bread Farm bun, it delivered roasted yam, garlic chard, herbed chevre, crispy onions and sprouts. The combination of veggies works perfectly. Other tempting items on the lunch and dinner menu include the roasted Brussels sprouts ($7) and the half-roasted chicken ($22), which I plan on going back for. The desserts also looked irresistible particularly the Salt and Smoke Vahlrona Cremeux ($8) and the Affogato ($6). Yake explained that while none of the partners originally comes from Bellingham, every member of the trio now resides in the city. Additionally, all three are serious coffee connoisseurs who met while working at Tony s Coffee. Yake recalls how Camber began as a wholesale coffee roaster in We started sending samples of our roasted coffee out to some of the most wellrespected cafes in the country and immediately had a good following on the wholesale side, he says. That following continues, and as it does this talented trio has focused on bringing a new coffee shop and eatery to the city that is filled with ambience, light, friendliness and really good food. Step inside and you ll be smitten. doit WED., NOV. 15 CRAB CLASS: Learn how to prepare seafood the right way at a Dungeness Crab class and demo taking place from 5:30-7:30pm at Blaine's Semiahmoo Resort, 9565 Semiahmoo Pkwy. Entry is $65 and includes food samples and a glass of wine. THANSKGIVING & BEER: Taste three Thanksgiving small plates (appetizers/main/ dessert) with three different Atwood farmhouse ales at a "Thanksgiving Beer Pairing" event from 6-8pm at Elizabeth Station, 1400 W. Holly St. Entry is $25 and includes recipes to take home. Please register in advance, as space is limited. (360) SQUASH CELEBRATION: Enjoy an evening of delicious seasonal dishes prepared by wellness chef Kate MacKenzie at a "Squash Celebration" course from 6:30-9pm at the Cordata Community Food Co-op, 315 Westerly Rd. Entry is $39. THURS., NOV. 16 EAT FOR THE ARTS: Help raise funds for the Sylvia Center for the Arts by heading to participating locales including Goat Mountain Pizza, Aslan Brewing Company, Hundred North, Redlight, Mallard Ice Cream, Pure Bliss Desserts, and more for an "Eat for the Arts" event taking place throughout the day and into the night. Participating locales will donate a portion of today's proceeds to the center's Capital Campaign. STONE SOUP SHARE: Seven chef-crafted soups will be served alongside seven local tales of gratitude at a Stone Soup Share starting at 6pm at BelleWood Acres, 6140 Guide Meridian. Tickets to the fundraiser for the Opportunity Council being hosted by Crave Catering are $25. The kid-friendly event will also feature music and libations. AH, PAREE!: Karina Davidson offers a culinary excursion to the City of Lights at an "Ah, Paree!" course from 6:30-9pm at the Cordata Community Food Co-op, 315 Westerly Rd. Come hungry! Course fee includes choice of wine or non-alcoholic beverage. Entry is $49. FRI., NOV. 17 CLEAN EATING: Certified food and health coach Demetree Robinson introduces a "Clean Eating" program from 2-3pm at the Cordata Community Food Co-op, 315 Westerly Rd. This program is not a diet but a lifestyle change, and can be tailored to address your individual needs food allergies, weight loss, management of chronic diseases, or others. Food samples (free of gluten, dairy and refined sugar) and notes will be provided. Entry is $5. COFFEE TASTING: Attend a weekly coffee tasting from 3-3:30pm at Camber Cafe, 221 W. Holly St. Entry is free, and no RSVP is needed to come in and enjoy a small tasting flight of the venue's single-origin coffees. FOOD NOT BOMBS: All are welcome to partake of nutritious and delicious vegan

31 doit meals when Food Not Bombs offers a community meal from 4-6pm every Friday on the corner of Magnolia Street and Cornwall Avenue (alongside the peace vigil). The event which is dedicated to spreading food, love and nonviolence as an action against war and poverty is free. HAMSTER BALL: Area wineries, breweries and culinary chocolate specialties from local vendors and Haggen Market Street Catering will be part of the third annual "Hamster Ball" from 6:30-10:30pm at the Bellingham Cruise Terminal, 355 Harris Ave. Admission to the event is $55 and entitles you to all of the food, three drink tickets, evening festivities and a chance to win one of five Wine, Beer & Chocolate Cellar prize packages. Guests are asked to bring a bottle of wine, beer, or chocolates with a suggested retail value of $20. Funds raised will benefit Cascade Connections, a nonprofit that has been providing quality services to people with disabilities in Whatcom County for more than 35 years. NOV HOLIDAY GIFTS: Cindy McKinney will demonstrate the creation of a wide array of gifts from the kitchen including tangy honey mustard, bacon jam, scone mix, peanut butter cups and a few quick candies at "Holiday Gifts from the Kitchen" classes from 3-5pm Friday at the Lynden Library (216 4th St.), and 11am-12:30pm Saturday at the Ferndale Library (2125 Main St.). Entry is free. Space is limited, so please register in advance. SAT., NOV. 18 PANCAKE BREAKFAST: Choose from pancakes, French toast or biscuits and gravy at a Pancake Breakfast taking place from 8-11am at the Ferndale Senior Center, 1999 Cherry St. Entry is $2.50 for kids and $6 for adults and includes scrambled eggs, ham or sausage, and beverages. (360) VFW BREAKFAST: Enjoy a breakfast of pancakes, French toast, eggs and sausage at a VFW Breakfast happening from 8-11am at Lynden's VFW Hall, 7011 Hannegan Rd. Entry is $6 (free for kids 5 and under). PANCAKE FEED: Boy Scouts of America Troop 4019 will host an all-you-can-eat Pancake Feed from 8am-12pm at VFW Post 1585, 625 N. State St. Tickets are $5.50 for one and $21 for five, and include eggs, sausage and beverages. There will be a 20 percent discount for veterans at the door. HARVEST MARKET: Stock up on fresh fall produce, works by local artisans and more when the Mount Vernon Farmers Market hosts its fourth annual Harvest Market from 10am-2pm at the city's Carnation Building, 117 N. First St. Entry is free and open to all. BELLINGHAM MARKET: The 25th season of the Bellingham Farmers Market continues from 10am- 3pm every Saturday through December at the Depot Market Square, 1000 Railroad Ave. Every week, a plethora of produce, crafts, ready-to-eat dining options and more are available. WINE & BEER FEST: Enjoy beer and spirits from regions throughout Washington including local Skagit County wineries, microbrews and spirits as well as gourmet appetizers and divine chocolate samples at the sixth annual Skagit Wine & Beer Festival happening from 3-8pm in Mount Vernon at Eaglemont, 4800 Eaglemont Dr. Tickets are $55-$ NOV HOLIDAY FARMERS MARKET: Stock up on holiday produce, your favorite vendors' goods, handmade gifts and much more when the Anacortes Farmers Market hosts it annual Holiday Market from 10am-4pm Saturday and Sunday at the Port of Anacortes Transit Shed Event Center, 100 Commercial Ave. Live music, a wine garden and more will be part of the festivities. CHEESE FEST: Sample exotic internationally and locally sourced sheep, goat and bovine cheeses at the 47th annual "Cheese Fest" taking place from 10am-6pm Saturday and Sunday in Van Zandt at Everybody's Store, 5465 Potter Rd. While you're there, continue your holiday gift-giving while perusing jewelry, clothing, housewares and more. Complimentary gift wrapping will be part of the free festivities. SUN., NOV. 19 COMMUNITY BREAKFAST: Eggs to order, omelets, bacon, sausage, hash browns, pancakes, French toast and more can be had at a monthly Community Breakfast from 8-11am at Sedro- Woolley's American Legion Post #43, 701 Murdock St. Entry is $5 for children, $7 for adults. COMMUNITY MEAL: All are welcome at the monthly Southside Community Meal happening from 5-6:30pm at Our Saviour's Lutheran Church, 1720 Harris Ave. Meals include a main dish, salad and more. Entry is free; guests are asked to bring a potluck dessert. MON., NOV. 20 BEER DINNER: Wander Brewing will team up with Camber to celebrate the shift in seasons at a Wander + Camber Beer Dinner taking place from 6:30-9pm at Camber, 221 W. Holly St. Diners taking part in the autumnal, locally sourced feast will enjoy a five-course meal paired with seven unique beers including some new additions to the Wander lineup. Entry is $80. THURS., NOV. 23 OLD TOWN THANKSGIVING: Dine on a festive feast prepared with food donated by local farmers, churches, unions, businesses and individuals at the 45th annual Thanksgiving Dinner taking place from 10am-3pm at Bellingham's Old Town Cafe, 316 W. Holly St. Per usual, entry is free and open to all. BUFFET DINNER: Classics such as roasted turkey, homemade stuffing and pumpkin pie will be on the menu at an expansive Thanksgiving Buffet Dinner from 12-5pm at the ballroom at Four Points Sheraton, 714 Lakeway Dr. Entry is $14 for kids, $30-$35 for adults. THANKSIVING POTLUCK: Bring a dish and/or drinks to share at a Thanksgiving Dinner Potluck and Party starting at 4pm at the Firehouse Performing Arts Center, 1314 Harris Ave. Turkey, plates, utensils and a family-friendly movie playing on the big screen will be part of the free festivities. Celebrate SHOP. WIN. DISCOVER. PICK UP YOUR LOCAL GIFT G UIDE THIS HOLIDAY S EASON, SHOP LOCAL AND WIN WITH THE Cheermeister Challenge WINNERS DRAWN EVERY FRIDAY IN DECEMBER FOR PRIZE PACKAGES VALUED AT OVER $300! SustainableConnections.org CASCADIA WEEKLY # DO IT 2 MAIL 4 VIEWS 6 CURRENTS 8 WORDS 12 GET OUT 14 STAGE 15 ART 16 MUSIC 18 FILM 22 B-BOARD 24 FOOD 30 31

32 $10 FREE-PLAY New Club Members Receive: Sign Up Today! THE PACIFIC SHOWROOM LEANN RIMES LovE is LovE Tour - Acoustic JAN 19 & 20 Service Charge Free at Casino Box Office C A SINO R E SORT theskagit.com On I-5 at Exit Must be 21 or older with valid ID. Details at Rewards Club. Management reserves all rights Upper Skagit Indian Tribe dba Skagit Valley Casino Resort.

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